first_imgThe new — and currently hard to get — Echo Dot. Ry Crist/CNET Good luck trying to get the new Echo Dot with two-day shipping.Amazon’s most popular smart speaker is out of stock until early March, according to the company’s website. Target is also out of stock on its site and Best Buy’s stock was limited to two of the three available colors.”Customer response to the all-new Echo Dot has been incredibly positive,” an Amazon spokesperson said in a statement Tuesday. “We’re working hard to get it back in stock.”The Echo Dot, which costs $50 and first became available in October, was out of stock at times during the holidays, when customer interest for new gadgets was at its highest all year. The Dot, which competes directly against the Google Home Mini speaker, became the best-selling item on Amazon worldwide during the holidays.It’s less typical for an Echo device to run out during a quieter part of the shopping year. The company had promoted the Alexa-powered gadget during a Super Bowl ad on Sunday, which may have sparked interest.Amazon said customers can check the Echo Dot page online for inventory updates. The company will continue accepting new orders, but Amazon won’t replenish its virtual shelves until March 5 for its charcoal Dot and March 11 for heather gray and sandstone, its website stated Tuesday.Availability for some colors of the Echo Spot, Echo and Echo Plus are delayed until Feb. 10; other colors for those models are in stock. See it Amazon Echo Dot $29 Preview • Amazon’s third Echo Dot takes a few cues from the Google Home Mini Adorama See It Smart Home Smart Speakers & Displays Review • Amazon Echo Dot 3 review: Alexa’s best Dot yet plays defense 2 $49 News • Amazon Echo Dot deal: 3 for $70 See Itcenter_img $29 CNET may get a commission from retail offers. See It Best Buy Crutchfield $49 Mentioned Above Amazon Echo Dot (third-generation, Charcoal) Alexa Amazon Best Buy Google Tags Share your voice Commentslast_img read more

first_imgJohn HarveyRegister to voteTexas will host the first statewide primaries of 2018 on March 6 and, with the Feb. 5 registration deadline fast approaching, Texans don’t have much time left to become eligible to vote. For both Democrats and Republicans, the race for U.S. Senate will be at the top of the ballot. U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz is vying against four other Republicans in his bid for re-election and U.S. Rep. Beto O’Rourke, D-El Paso, is the most well-known of three Democrats aiming to unseat him.Eight Texans in the U.S. House aren’t running for re-election, which has led to some packed races to replace them, including 18 Republicans and four Democrats running for the seat U.S. Rep. Lamar Smith, R-San Antonio, has held for more than 30 years. And three Republicans running for re-election — U.S. Reps. John Culberson of Houston, Pete Sessions of Dallas, and Will Hurd of Helotes — have emerged as top targets for Democrats as potential pick-ups in November, creating higher stakes in the Democratic primaries there.At the state level, nine candidates are crowding the Democratic gubernatorial primary, with the highest-profile being former Dallas County Sheriff Lupe Valdez and Houston entrepreneur Andrew White, son of late Texas Gov. Mark White. And Republican Land Commissioner George P. Bush is facing three primary challengers including Jerry Patterson, who previously held the job.  Share Lower on the ballot, all of the seats in the Texas House of Representatives and half of those in the Texas Senate are up for re-election.Here’s how Texans who aren’t yet registered to vote can do so in time for the March 6 primary:Voters need to submit their applications at least 30 days in advance of an election. Registering online isn’t an option in Texas.To register, Texans can fill out an application in person at their county voter registrar’s office or pick up a copy at other locations including local libraries and most post offices and high schools. They can also print out the application online or request it through the mail. Voters must submit their registration to the county where they are a resident, according to the Texas Secretary of State’s website. Mailed applications must be postmarked before or on the Feb. 5 deadline.You can look up if you’re already registered to vote at the Texas Secretary of State’s website.Early voting starts on Feb. 20.last_img read more

first_imgGender stereotyping in baby boys and girls may start as young as three months and men recognise gender of the new-born babies based on the pitch of their cries, researchers reveal. Adults often wrongly assume babies with higher-pitched cries as females and lower-pitched cries as males.The findings revealed that inspite of no actual difference in pitch between the voices of girls and boys before puberty, the study found that adults make assumptions about the gender of babies based on their cries. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’“It is intriguing that gender stereotyping can start as young as three months, with adults attributing degrees of femininity and masculinity to babies solely based on the pitch of their cries,” said David Reby from the University of Sussex in Britain. The team recorded the spontaneous cries of 15 boys and 13 girls who were on average four months old and the participating adults were a mixture of parents and non-parents.They synthetically altered the pitch of the cries while leaving all other features of the cries unchanged to ensure they could isolate the impact of the pitch alone.  Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixThe results also indicate that men assume that boy babies are in more discomfort than girl babies with the same pitched cry which may indicate that this sort of gender stereotyping is more ingrained in men. “The research shows that we tend to wrongly attribute what we know about adults —that men have lower pitched voices than women — to babies, when, in fact, the pitch of children’s voices does not differ between sexes until puberty,” added Nicolas Mathevon from Hunter College in the US in the paper published in the journal BMC Psychology.last_img read more