Britain has asked EU to stall Brexit till June 30 PM May

first_imgLondon: Britain has asked EU leaders to delay Brexit until June 30, Prime Minister Theresa May told parliament on Wednesday, on eve of an EU summit in Brussels. May said she had written to EU President Donald Tusk “informing him that the UK seeks an extension to the Article 50 period to June 30”. “I don’t want a long extension,” she said, warning that a longer delay would mean Britain having to hold European Parliament elections at the end of May. Also Read – Saudi Crown Prince ‘snubbed’ Pak PM, recalled jet from US”The idea that three years after voting to leave the EU, the people of this country should be asked to elect a new set of MEPs is, I believe, unacceptable,” she said. “As prime minister, I am not prepared to delay Brexit any further than June 30,” she said. In the letter to Tusk released by Downing Street, May said she intended to bring the Brexit deal she has negotiated with the EU back to parliament even though MPs have rejected it twice by overwhelming margins. Also Read – Record number of 35 candidates in fray for SL Presidential polls”If the motion is passed, I am confident that parliament will proceed to ratify the deal constructively. But this will clearly not be completed before 29 March 2019,” she wrote, adding that the timetable for passing the necessary legislation to allow Brexit was “inevitably uncertain”. “I am therefore writing to inform the European Council that the UK is seeking an extension to the Article 50 period… until 30 June 2019.” Meanwhile, British Prime Minister Theresa May faced a cabinet revolt if she asked the EU for a long delay to Brexit, media reports said Wednesday, even after she had warned MPs of such a possibility. Downing Street confirmed that May would be asking EU leaders meeting in Brussels on Thursday to delay Britain’s March 29 exit day by only a short period, saying voters wanted to get on with Brexit. The decision followed a cabinet meeting on Tuesday, where several Brexit-supporting ministers reportedly indicated they might quit if the delay was long. Any delay can only be decided by EU leaders. One source was reported as saying that the divisions at the top of British government made it feel “like the last days of Rome”. May herself has repeatedly said she does not want to delay Brexit, but has conceded this is highly likely given the parliamentary deadlock over the process. MPs have twice rejected the divorce deal she struck with Brussels, and also ruled out leaving the EU with no deal.last_img

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