first_imgSecretary of the Senate, Nanbolor SingbehWhile awaiting the Commercial Court’s judgment to establish if J. Nanborlor Singbeh, secretary of the Liberian Senate, misappropriated over a million dollars in equipment and materials belonging to a Czech Republic-based company, MHM Eko-Liberia, another lawsuit has been filed against Singbeh.The latest lawsuit filed before the Magisterial Court in Kakata, Margibi County, was brought by Mrs. Gartee Lorwoe, the widow of the late James Lorwoe, in which she claimed that Singbeh owed her and her five children US$20,000, equivalent to four years unpaid rental fees for fifty acres of undeveloped forest land that contained two large deposits of rocks around the Leiyea Mountain, situated at Seeke Town, District#4, Margibi County.Singbeh, according to the suit, entered into the agreement for a period of five years with an annual rental fee of US$5,000. In addition, the company was to pay Lorwoe a fee of US$1.00 for every ton of rocks sold.Singbeh is expected to appear before the court on Monday, March 11, 2019, at the precise hour of 2:00 p.m.MHM Eko Liberia and James Lorwoe entered into the five-year lease agreement that commenced on July 1, 2013 and was expected to have expired on June 30, 2018.Singbeh is the president and chairman of the board of directors of MHM Eko-Liberia, a company established in 2013 to engage in the production of crushed rocks.He also holds 30 percent of a total of 100 shares, while two Czech Republic nationals, Pavel Miloschewsky and Martin Miloschewsky, hold 35 percent each.Singbeh, then the chairman of the company, was the liaison between the family and the company.But, Mrs. Lorwoe, in her suit against Singbeh, claimed that before the death of her husband, Singbeh, on November 11, 2013 paid US$5,000 for the first year as lease of their forest land in the county.Few days after the payment of US$5,000 for the first year, James Lorwoe got sick and later was pronounced dead.It was when the Probate Court, in Margibi County issued Mrs. Gartee Lorwoe a letter of administration, giving her the legal power to administer the Intestate Estate of the Late James Lorwoe.A copy of the lease agreement, obtained by the Daily Observer, claimed that in the case of a sublease, the MHM Eko-Liberia shall be required to pay the Lorwoe 25% of the difference between the rent covered by the said lease agreement and the sub-lease agreement with a third party.MHM Eko-Liberia, shall also be solely responsible to pay all taxes levied assessed against the property as provided by law during the period covered by the agreement and any other extension.After the first payment of US$5,000, since the death of Mr. Lorwoe and up to present, the suit claimed, Singbeh has persistently refused to pay the lease rental for the period of four years in the amount of US$20,000, despite the expiration of the lease agreement.Mrs. Lorwoe claims that, not being able to pay her US$20,000, Singbeh has been taking away equipment and materials belonging to the company, ofor which she has asked the court to place a stay order against Singbeh pending the outcome of her suit.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

first_imgROME – Luciano Pavarotti, whose vibrant high C’s and ebullient showmanship made him one of the world’s most beloved tenors, died Thursday, his manager told The Associated Press. He was 71. His manager, Terri Robson, told the AP in an e-mailed statement that Pavarotti died at his home in Modena, Italy, at 5 a.m. local time. Pavarotti had been diagnosed with pancreatic cancer last year and underwent further treatment in August. “The Maestro fought a long, tough battle against the pancreatic cancer which eventually took his life. In fitting with the approach that characterized his life and work, he remained positive until finally succumbing to the last stages of his illness,” the statement said. For serious fans, the unforced beauty and thrilling urgency of Pavarotti’s voice made him the ideal interpreter of the Italian lyric repertory, especially in the 1960s and `70s when he first achieved stardom. For millions more, his charismatic performances of standards like “Nessun dorma” from Puccini’s “Turandot” came to represent what opera is all about. In the annals of that rare and coddled breed, the operatic tenor, it may well be said the 20th century began with Enrico Caruso and ended with Pavarotti. Other tenors – Domingo included – may have drawn more praise from critics for their artistic range and insights, but none could equal the combination of natural talent and personal charm that so endeared him to audiences. “Pavarotti is the biggest superstar of all,” the late New York Times music critic Harold Schonberg once said. “He’s correspondingly more spoiled than anybody else. They think they can get away with anything. Thanks to the glory of his voice, he probably can.” In his heyday, he was known as the “King of the High C’s” for the ease with which he tossed off difficult top notes. In fact it was his ability to hit nine glorious high C’s in quick succession that first turned him into an international superstar singing Tonio’s aria “Ah! Mes amis,” in Donizetti’s “La Fille du Regiment” at New York’s Metropolitan Opera in 1972. His name seemed to show up as much in gossip columns as serious music reviews, particularly after he split with Adua Veroni, his wife of 35 years and mother of their three daughters, and then took up with his 26-year-old secretary in 1996. In late 2003, he married Nicoletta Mantovani in a lavish, star-studded ceremony. Pavarotti said their daughter Alice, nearly a year old at the time of the wedding, was the main reason he and Mantovani finally wed after years together. In the latter part of his career, some music critics cited what they saw as an increasing tendency toward the vulgar and the commercial. In 1990, he appeared with Domingo and Carreras in a concert at the Baths of Caracalla in Rome for the end of soccer’s World Cup. The concert was a huge success, and the record known as “The Three Tenors” was a best-seller and was nominated for two Grammy awards. The video sold over 750,000 copies. The three-tenor extravaganza became a mini-industry. With a follow-up album recorded at Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles in 1994, the three have outsold every other performer of classical music. A 1996 tour earned each tenor an estimated $10 million. Pavarotti was preparing to leave New York in July 2006 to resume a farewell tour when doctors discovered a malignant pancreatic mass, his manager Terri Robson said at the time. He underwent surgery in a New York hospital, and all his remaining 2006 concerts were canceled. Pancreatic cancer is one of the most dangerous forms of the disease, though doctors said the surgery offered improved hopes for survival. “I was a fortunate and happy man,” Pavarotti told Italian daily Corriere della Sera in an interview published about a month after the surgery. “After that, this blow arrived.” “And now I am paying the penalty for this fortune and happiness,” he told the newspaper. Faced with speculation that the tenor was near death, Mantovani, his second wife, told Italian newspaper La Stampa in July 2007: “He’s fighting like a lion and he has never lost his heart.” Pavarotti had three daughters with his first wife, Lorenza, Cristina and Giuliana; and one, Alice, with his second wife.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! Instantly recognizable from his charcoal black beard and tuxedo-busting girth, Pavarotti radiated an intangible magic that helped him win hearts in a way Placido Domingo and Jose Carreras – his partners in the “Three Tenors” concerts – never quite could. “I always admired the God-given glory of his voice – that unmistakable special timbre from the bottom up to the very top of the tenor range,” Domingo said in a statement from Los Angeles. “I also loved his wonderful sense of humor and on several occasions of our concerts with Jose Carreras – the so-called Three Tenors concerts – we had trouble remembering that we were giving a concert before a paying audience, because we had so much fun between ourselves,” he said. The tenor, who seemed equally at ease singing with soprano Joan Sutherland as with the Spice Girls, scoffed at accusations that he was sacrificing his art in favor of commercialism. “The word commercial is exactly what we want,” he said, after appearing in the widely publicized “Three Tenors” concerts. “We’ve reached 1.5 billion people with opera. If you want to use the word commercial, or something more derogatory, we don’t care. Use whatever you want.” last_img