first_imgDonegal County Council has been urged to improve signs and road markings at the Claremans Junction outside Letterkenny in the aftermath of a crash.The call was made after a serious collision occurred in the area at the beginning of summer.Cllr Michael McBride, who was at the scene of the crash, told the council this week that two young people were ‘very lucky’ to escape serious injury after the t-bone collision. Cllr McBride said that there was a lack of visible signs warning motorists of the junction ahead and that one side became covered by growth during the summer.The back road has been used more often this year as motorists took the route to avoid the Blue Banks roadworks between Letterkenny and Kilmacrennan.Cllr McBride added that many cars get stuck in the area during times of snow and ice and that improved signs would alert people as they approach the junction.The Council Roads Department is due to assess the area and carry out lining works or signage if required. Serious accident sparks call for warning signs at junction outside Letterkenny was last modified: September 12th, 2019 by Rachel McLaughlinShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:claremans junctionCllr Michael McBrideletterkenny-milford municipal districtlast_img read more

first_imgScience is messy, but it doesn’t have to be dirty.On June 19, a group of respected energy researchers released a paper in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) that critiqued a widely cited study on how to power the U.S. using only renewable energy sources. This new paper, authored by former NOAA researcher Christopher Clack and a small army of academics, said that the initial 2015 study had “errors, inappropriate methods and implausible assumptions,” about using only the sun, wind, and water to fuel the U.S.What followed was a storm of debate as energy wonks of all stripes weighed in on the merits of the PNAS analysis. Mark Z. Jacobson, a Stanford University professor who was the lead author of the 2015 study, shot back with detailed rebuttals, in one calling his fellow researchers “fossil fuel and nuclear supporters.”Why the big kerfuffle? As an energy researcher who studies the technologies and policies for modernizing our energy system, I will try to explain.In general, getting to a clean energy system — even if it’s 80% renewable — is a well agreed-upon goal and one that can be achieved; it’s that last 20% —and how to get there — that forms the main point of contention here. The nitty-grittyTo make projections around how the future energy system will work, researchers create computer-based models, input assumptions, and then run simulations.The rebuttal from Clack and his co-authors focused on four major issues they saw with the WWS paper: 1) modeling errors, 2) implausible assumptions, 3) insufficient power system modeling, and 4) inadequate scrutiny of the input climate model, which informs how much solar and wind power are available for power generation. Here are some highlights with my own thoughts sprinkled in.Clack takes issue with the amount of hydroelectric power that Jacobson assumes is available. In their rebuttals, they spar over the exact numbers, but Jacobson assumes there will be about the same amount of total energy produced from hydropower in 2050 as today, although when, and at what rate, that energy is produced is a crucial question.In Jacobson’s model, there is a significant increase in hydropower capacity — up to 1,300 gigawatts (or about 10 times current capacity), which appears to run for at least 12 hours straight in some days of the model output. Jacobson says this is possible by installing more turbines and generators at existing dams, just not using them very often.But dams are built with specific maximum flow rates because if you let too much water flow through a dam, you can flood areas downriver. Jacobson has since admitted that providing this much extra power from existing dams would be hard.I recently took a tour of Hoover Dam. One of the first things the tour guides tell you is that the dam was built for irrigation and flood control, and that electricity production is a nice side product. So expecting that dams in the country could boost their output might be harder than the analysis implies. Joshua Rhodes is a post-doctoral researcher of energy at the University of Texas at Austin. This post originally appeared at The Conversation. ‘Energy Twitter’ on fireJacobson’s seminal paper, which was also published in PNAS, tied together a significant amount of work of his own and others showing that all energy used for all purposes in the U.S. could come from with wind, water, and solar (WWS) by 2050.What about when the sun doesn’t shine, the wind doesn’t blow, or water is unavailable? His findings postulated that significant amounts of energy storage would be needed, mostly in the form of heat and hydrogen, to meet energy demand when there isn’t enough renewable energy and to store it when there’s too much. Jacobson and his co-authors also concluded that this scenario would be cheaper than a world that relies on other technologies such as nuclear, carbon capture, and other methods of reducing carbon emissions.The Clack rebuttal was blunt and cut deep at the assumptions that underlie the work of Jacobson and colleagues. The same PNAS issue also included a counter-rebuttal to Clack from Jacobson.Energy Twitter — that is, energy wonks like me on Twitter — exploded.So why all the fuss?Much of the heat from this debate seems to stem from Jacobson making some pretty bold claims in and about his paper, going so far as to tell MIT Technology Review that “there is not a single error in our paper.” That is a very, very bold claim and, depending on how it is interpreted, could be read to say that the study authors’ model is perfect, which of course it is not, as none are.This debate may seem arcane, but it has significant political and societal implications.Some celebrities have signed on to Jacobson’s vision and have pressed for policies formed around his analyses of the feasibility of an entire energy system that runs 100% on wind, water, and solar. If policymakers buy into the technical and economic assumptions in the paper, those assumptions will have big implications for the direction of state, local, and national policies.Detractors, meanwhile, have raised a number of concerns. In particular, they argue that decisions made based on Jacobson’s analyses alone could lead to serious over-investment in only the technologies considered, which could possibly backfire if the costs turn out to be higher than expected. The Cheapest Way to Scale Up Renewable Energy?Transforming the Electric SystemSolar Potential Is Far Greater Than Earlier EstimatesRethinking the GridTo Improve Wind and Solar Power, Bring Them Together How Renewable Energy Advocates Are Hurting the Climate CauseOur All-Renewable Energy FutureAccounting for Renewable Electricity SavingsWind Overtakes Hydro as Top Renewable in U.S.Government Estimates on Renewables Are Way Offcenter_img Insufficient power system modelingClack attacks LOADMATCH, the power system model in Jacobson’s analysis, as being too simplistic. The main criticism of LOADMATCH is that it does not consider frequency regulation — the need to keep the frequency of the power grid steady at 60 Hz, which is a very important aspect of keeping the power supply reliable.One piece of anecdotal information: Jacobson states in the paper Supplementary Information that it takes LOADMATCH about three to four minutes to simulate an entire year. Our simulations of just the Texas electricity market can take hours to run, and can take significantly longer for simulations of high levels of renewables.After reading both papers, both supplementary information sections, the counter-rebuttal, a lot of news articles and tweet-storms (from other energy folks I trust), I find myself thinking that the burden of proof is still in Jacobson’s court. There are many lessons to learn here.But, in the end, my view is that the body of scientific understanding will be stronger for it. The peer review process is slow, uses imperfect human volunteers, and doesn’t always get it exactly right the first time. The list of authors on the Clack rebuttal is impressive, and should be paid attention to. However, if Jacobson’s work can survive this challenge, I figure it will stand the test of time. Implausible assumptionsClack questions a long list of input assumptions of Jacobson’s model. A number are related to how quickly technologies can mature and be used at large scale, including underground thermal energy storage, phase change materials to store solar thermal energy, and hydrogen as a usable fuel. Other critiques focus on assumptions around how flexible the demand for energy can be — a key consideration when dealing with variable sun and wind power. Then there’s the amount of electric transmission power infrastructure needed, the costs of all the capital required, the pace of investment needed, and land use issues.Some criticisms are probably fair. I tend to be bullish on the potential of technology to advance rapidly, but having worked in residential energy use, and energy retrofits in particular, I find that Jacobson’s assumptions about the amount of geothermal energy storage retrofits for heating and air-conditioning in buildings are hard to fathom.I have some reservations on the ability of 67% of demand to be flexible. I also have some questions on the pace of investment required in Jacobson’s scenario. RELATED ARTICLES last_img read more

first_imgMaster Blaster Sachin Tendulkar set new records on Tuesday when he scored his 51st Test century against South Africa in Cape Town.A look at his recordsThis is Tendulkar’s second ton in Cape Town.He is the first non-South African to score two Test centuries in Cape Town. His first century came during the 1996-97 tour when he scored 169.This is Tendulkar’s 5th ton on South African soil – the maximum by any overseas batsman. Englishman Wally Hammond and Aussie Neil Harvey had scored four apiece.This is Tendulkar’s 7th century against South Africa. Only Neil Harvey and Ricky Ponting have scored 1 more.Amazingly, this is his 12th Test ton after turning 35. England’s Graham Gooch is the only other batsman to hit as many Test centuries after the age of 35.An indication of his spectacular overseas performance is that he has scored 29 Test centuries away from home – the highest by any batsman.last_img read more

first_imgWith the Twenty20 title already in his kitty, India skipper Mahendra Singh Dhoni on Saturday said he wants to lift the upcoming ICC World Cup in the sub-continent as the coveted trophy is the ultimate dream of every cricketer.India captain Mahendra Singh Dhoni. APDhoni, under whose leadership India won the inaugural Twenty20 World Cup in 2008, said his burning desire is to see India capture the trophy for its fans.”Every one of us in the India dressing room wants to lift that cup, not only for ourselves, but also for the billions of fans we have around the globe. It is not a surprise to me as it doesn’t get any bigger than the World Cup.”It is the ultimate dream of every cricketer to represent his country in this competition and win the trophy at least once in his career. It will require a lot of hard work, self belief and also a positive approach which Team India is capable of displaying at the highest level,” Dhoni said during a promotional ICC event in Cape Town to mark the 50-day countdown celebrations of the mega-event starting next month.With little more than a month to go for the tournament, Dhoni said he can feel the buzz around him.”With just 50 days remaining before we launch our campaign to win the ICC Cricket World Cup 2011, I can clearly feel and sense the tremendous excitement which is gripping the cricket fraternity,” he said.Commenting on his side’s preparations for the World Cup, the wicket-keeper batsman said: “I’m happy with our preparations so far as we have gelled well, we have backed each other all the way and have played some excellent cricket lately.advertisement”But we are also aware that we need to peak at the right time and maintain a winning momentum as the competition will be tough and every team will enter the event fancying its chances.””Each team and match will bring a fresh challenge and we will have to play to our potential every time we take the field,” he added.The charismatic India captain urged the spectators to play their part in making the event the most successful ever.”I also take this opportunity to urge the India public and spectators to support the tournament and all the teams taking part in it. I would love to see every stadium packed to capacity even when we are not playing,” Dhoni said.”With billions of eyes following the World Cup on television, this would be another great opportunity for us to showcase our love and passion for this great sport. Let us all unite and make the ICC Cricket World Cup 2011 in the subcontinent the best ever,” he added.The tournament begins in Mirpur, Dhaka, on February 19 with the India taking on co-hosts Bangladesh in the opener.During the event at the picturesque and world famous V&A Waterfront in Cape Town on Saturday evening, the World Cup trophy was put on display and an official promotional film was revealed to celebrate the arrival of the game’s flagship event.Among others present at the occassion were ICC chief executive Haroon Lorgat, South Africa captain Graeme Smith and Western Cape Premier Helen Zille.South Africa captain Graeme Smith, whose side opens its campaign against two-time champions West Indies in New Delhi on February 24, said: “I can’t believe that the World Cup is only 50 days away! The spectacular way that 50 days to the World Cup was marked is a pointer to the magnitude of the event.””As a unit, we are looking to make sure we head into the showpiece with the best preparation possible. The five-match ODI series against India starting on January 12 will be our last chance to make sure we are fully prepared and we hope to bring home the silverware,” Smith said.ICC chief Lorgat said he was delighted to see the interest and excitement amongst the players and followers of the game for the tournament.”With 50 days to go before cricket’s flagship event starts, key players are starting to think and talk a lot more about the World Cup. The players will soon start with their World Cup focus and preparation and the related anticipation across the world will escalate with each passing day,” Lorgat said.Lorgat also urged all the three host countries — India, Sri Lanka Bangladesh — to step up their preparations and complete all the infrastructure work in time to successfully stage a world-class event.”We must do our utmost to complete all the necessary work to deliver another memorable event,” he added.advertisementLorgat also thanked the host countries and ICC’s commercial partners for their excellent work to date.With inputs from PTIlast_img read more

first_imgDon’t miss out on the latest news and information. Private companies step in to help SEA Games hosting The U.S. is ranked No. 1 in the world and will face the Czech Republic, Japan and Turkey during Group E games in Shanghai. The Americans will hold training camps in Las Vegas and Los Angeles in August, then have exhibition games in California and Australia before arriving in China.The U.S. is seeking its third consecutive World Cup gold medal.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Philippine Arena Interchange inaugurated Atlanta Hawks head coach Lloyd Pierce reacts in the first half of an NBA basketball game against the Indiana Pacers Wednesday, April 10, 2019, in Atlanta. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)Atlanta Hawks coach Lloyd Pierce has been added as an assistant coach for USA Basketball this summer, when the Americans will compete in the FIBA World Cup in China and try to qualify for the 2020 Tokyo Olympics.Pierce is replacing Indiana Pacers coach Nate McMillan, who withdrew because of scheduling conflicts. Pierce, the Golden State Warriors’ Steve Kerr and Villanova’s Jay Wright will be the assistants under head coach Gregg Popovich of the San Antonio Spurs.ADVERTISEMENT Duterte wants probe of SEA Games mess Suns fire Igor Igor Kokoskov after 1 losing season PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games PLAY LIST 02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games02:11Trump awards medals to Jon Voight, Alison Krauss View comments MOST READ DA eyes importing ‘galunggong’ anew SEA Games hosting troubles anger Duterte Hontiveros presses for security audit of national power grid LATEST STORIES Panelo: Duterte ‘angry’ with SEA Games hosting hassles Cayetano: Senate, Drilon to be blamed for SEA Games mess The World Cup stretches through Sept. 15. The demands of the schedule and the travel would have likely been too daunting for McMillan — whose Pacers are scheduled to open training camp not long after the World Cup gold-medal game, and will then travel to India for a pair of preseason games on Oct. 4-5.“It’s an honor to receive this opportunity to represent our country and to work with such great coaches and staff,” Pierce said. “My family and I are excited about and committed to enjoying this journey.”FEATURED STORIESSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSPalace wants Cayetano’s PHISGOC Foundation probed over corruption chargesSPORTSSingapore latest to raise issue on SEA Games food, logisticsPierce has history with U.S. men’s national team managing director Jerry Colangelo. When Colangelo was working for Philadelphia, Pierce was an assistant coach there.“He has demonstrated the ability in particular to be an outstanding defensive coach,” Colangelo said. “Also, it was evident during our time together in Philadelphia that he was a strong leader, players respected him a great deal. I think we’re fortunate to have someone of his abilities. I think he’s really a good addition.”last_img read more