first_imgJeff Horn. INQUIRER PHOTO/ROY LUARCABRISBANE, Australia—If trainer Glenn Rushton’s grand description of  Jeff Horn turns out to be true, then Manny Pacquiao is in for a brutal tussle on July 2.A punishing 10-week training camp, according to Rushton, has turned Horn into a fighting machine. Somebody with “hands like steel, body like granite,” and with “the strength of an ox.”ADVERTISEMENT With both Pacquiao and Horn wielding a heavy hand, said there’s a good chance of a stoppage late in the fight.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Rushton said he’s hoping that Pacquiao will bring his A-game into the “Battle of Brisbane” at the 52,500-seat Suncorp Stadium because Horn will definitely be at his best form ever.After studying hundreds of tapes of Pacquiao’s previous fights, especially against the likes of Ricky Hatton, Oscar dela Hoya and Juan Manuel Marquez, Rushton has meticulously crafted a secret 10-point plan against Pacquiao.Rushton said if Horn will be able to follow the plan to the letter, and be on his toes every second of the 12-round bout, the former school teacher will be able to hurdle Pacquiao and shock the world.Rushton liked Pacquiao-Horn to a collision between an unstoppable force (Pacquiao) and an immovable object (Horn).And with Horn in terrific shape, Horn promises a much better fight than Pacquiao versus Jessie Vargas, Pacquiao against Timothy Bradley and Pacquiao against Juan Manuel Marquez.ADVERTISEMENT Cayetano to unmask people behind ‘smear campaign’ vs him, SEA Games LATEST STORIES Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss PLAY LIST 02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games Horn to take leaf out of Marquez book vs Pacquiao WATCH: Firefighters rescue baby seal found in parking garage Heart Evangelista admits she’s pregnant… with chicken MOST READcenter_img What ‘missteps’? Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Rushton, a self-made millionaire and mixed martial arts expert, also said during Horn’s media workout at the gym inside his mansion, that he hasn’t seen anybody really hurt Horn in the ring.Not even during his amateur days where Horn represented Australia in both the World Championships and the 2012 Olympics.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutAnd not in the pro ranks, where Horn holds a 16-0-1 record with 11 knockouts.In addition, Rushton swears that Horn has the will and the heart to give trouble to anybody, including Pacquiao. Ethel Booba on hotel’s clarification that ‘kikiam’ is ‘chicken sausage’: ‘Kung di pa pansinin, baka isipin nila ok lang’ 1 dead in Cavite blast, fire World’s 50 Best Restaurants launches new drinking and dining guide Lacson: SEA Games fund put in foundation like ‘Napoles case’ View commentslast_img read more

first_imgThe United Nations campaign highlighting the work of the world’s humanitarian workers has reached 100 million people through social media so far, the world body announced today, describing it as its “first milestone” that gets it closer to the one billion mark, which it aims to reach by World Humanitarian Day on 19 August.The campaign, ‘I Was Here,’ allows transmission of messages of support from people who have registered online across the world pledging humanitarian action, however big or small. Members of the public can then share their individual acts of good through the interactive website www.whd-iwashere.org.Organized by the UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA), the campaign has gained momentum in the past few days following the video recording – in front of more than 1,200 fans, celebrities, humanitarian workers and dignitaries – on Friday night, at the General Assembly Hall at UN Headquarters in New York, of US performing artist Beyoncé singing the song “I Was Here.’The video of the song, which Beyoncé and songwriter Diane Warren donated to the campaign, will premiere globally on 19 August, with displays on big screens in the cities of Dubai, Geneva, Addis Ababa, as well as in New York City’s Times Square, among other locales.“Everyone can be a humanitarian. All it takes is one act to help someone else,” the UN Under-Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs, Valerie Amos, said during the Friday night event, which was hosted by television journalist Anderson Cooper. “That’s the spirit of people helping people.”During the event, Mr. Cooper interviewing former child soldier Ishmael Beah, who fought in Sierra Leone’s civil war; Pernille Ironside, a UN Children’s Fund (UNICEF) child protection officer; New York photographer Erin Dinan, whose non-profit organization One Sandwich at a Time feeds people living on the streets; and Laurent Vieira de Mello, whose father – a senior UN official, Sergio Vieira de Mello – died along with 21 other humanitarians in an attack in Iraq.The General Assembly proclaimed 19 August as World Humanitarian Day in 2008 to commemorate that attack, which took place at the UN’s offices in Baghdad’s Canal Hotel in 2003. In addition to killing 22 people, another150 people were injured.The Day aims to honor those who have lost their lives in humanitarian service and those who continue to bring assistance and relief to millions, in addition to drawing attention to humanitarian needs worldwide and the importance of international cooperation in meeting those needs.last_img read more

first_img KUSI Newsroom KUSI Newsroom, Posted: August 7, 2019 SAN DIEGO (KUSI) – County Supervisors Nathan Fletcher and Greg Cox will launch a program Wednesday to help mitigate the use of high-polluting vehicles around the county.Fletcher and Cox will hold a news conference to launch the County Air Pollution Control District’s “Clean Air for All” campaign, which will allow businesses, nonprofits and government organizations to replace their high- emission vehicles with more climate friendly options.Officials with the California Air Resources Board will also present the county with roughly $28.5 million in state grants to fund the program. Earlier this year, the CARB also awarded $2.5 million to the Air Pollution Control District to monitor air quality in Barrio Logan, Logan Heights, Sherman Heights and parts of National City.The news conference and check presentation will be held at the County Administration Center at 1600 Pacific Highway. The launch event is scheduled to begin at 1 p.m. Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwitter County to Launch High-Emission Vehicle Replacement Campaign August 7, 2019last_img read more

first_img Plus, audiences seem to be catching on. Also in September, The New York Times Magazine will release a VR series in conjunction with their twice-yearly, travel-themed issue. The September issue, “Voyages,” will be image-heavy and showcase multiple destinations chosen by photographers. The associated VR content will show these destinations from the photographers’ point-of-view. While VR is not necessarily new, the recent explosion can be linked to improvements in technology. Wright says on the production side, efficiency has increased for The New York Times since it started working with VR. Just last year, editors had to manually stitch together video footage, often leaving an obvious seam in the video. Today, this process is automated, which means it takes less time to create each new piece. “I really believe that weekend was a moment. Socially it trended all weekend long… There was a ton of press. So it really was a watershed moment that made it a much broader focal point for a lot of publishers,” Wright tells Folio:. Despite the growth in content, there is no true virtual reality team. Jenna Pirog, producer of “The Displaced,” joined the magazine as The New York Times’ first ever virtual reality editor, and works on editorial content across publications. Everyone else, Wright says, has just incorporated VR into their job duties. The future of VR The New York Times now develops VR content across the magazine, newspaper, and T Brand Studio. An additional 300,000 Google Cardboard headsets were sent to select digital subscribers in spring. The app now has over 850,000 downloads and over 10 million views. New content is uploaded a few times a month, but Wright says that will increase exponentially into next year. The business model for Time Inc.’s VR seems to be under renovation. The Sports Illustrated Swimsuit app, which promises “exclusive virtual reality content that will put you on set with Swimsuit’s hottest models,” is presented by Lexus, with the brand’s logo on key pages of the app. In-app purchases from $1.99–$4.99 open more content, though magazine subscribers can access premium content for free. On Nov. 7 and 8, in conjunction with Google Cardboard, 1 million home subscribers received VR headsets with their daily newspaper. With an invitation to download the app, and The New York Times Magazine cover story to match, readers were engulfed in a multimedia journalistic experience called “The Displaced,” which follows three child refugees from around the world. Content for Sports Illustrated was in partnership with Wevr and InStyle produced their two 360 videos with River Studios. While Time Inc. wouldn’t comment on the projects, the company announced in May that it partnered with the California-based firm NextVR to develop content for the LIFE VR app. Creative partners In September, Condé Nast will release a six-episode scripted series in VR. The Doug Liman directed series, entitled “Invisible,” tells the story of a New York family with secret powers. The project is produced in partnership with Jaunt and Samsung, and is sponsored exclusively by Lexus.center_img There are a few major VR projects on the docket in the upcoming months. LIFE VR, however, will be operated in part by The Foundry, Time Inc.’s own branded content studio. While spokespeople wouldn’t comment on the topic, it seems possible that Time Inc. will also unveil branded VR content. If you want to know why magazine brands are investing in virtual reality, just look at the numbers. NYTVR, the virtual reality app launched by The New York Times Magazine last November, has an average of 6.5 minutes of audience engagement per session. “When you have 57 percent coming back for more, month after month, that shows that they’re seeing this as a whole new way to experience and be present in a story,” Wright says. “So we think this is something that will continue to build and be a big way in which The New York Times tells stories.” Outside of The New York Times, it’s not uncommon for publishers to team up with external VR producers. Time Inc. published 360 video under the Sports Illustrated and InStyle brands, and in May it announced an impending project called LIFE VR in conjunction with the existing LIFE brand. “In the initial several months, what was amazing about it is that we took existing staff who treated this almost as a passion project, and people were able to mobilize around it,” Wright says. “They were excited about it, and we acted almost like a startup.” Google Cardboard was distributed to 1.3 million of The New York Times’ print and digital subscribers. “That’s 6.5 minutes of people putting cardboard up to their heads,” Andy Wright, SVP, advertising and publisher of The New York Times Magazine, tells Folio:. “In digital media terms, that’s mind-blowing.” Though smaller in scale, Hearst too will dip their toes in VR. The publisher announced a partnership between Cosmopolitan and “Magic Mike Live,” a male-stripper centered performance launching at the Hard Rock Hotel in Las Vegas in March 2017. The partnership includes articles, galleries, videos and quizzes, as well as some virtual reality, according to WWD. “The Displaced” launched on the app along with films for two sponsors, GE and Mini. GE worked with the in-house branded content workshop T Brand Studio to create a custom 360 animated film. Mini joined the project with two existing films that were looking for distribution. last_img read more

first_imgRoad accident LogoTwo people were killed following after a car and a microbus collided with a parked CNG-run auto-rickshaw at Panchlaish in the port city of Chattogram early Sunday, reports UNB.The deceased are auto rickshaw driver Md Hanif, 40, son of Md Mostafa of Halishahar Brick Field area and car passenger Md Fardin, 18, son of Abul Bashar Milon of Nasirabad Batagoli area in the city.The collision took place when a microbus coming down from ‘King of Chittagong’ club hit a car which was going towards the club and the auto-rickshaw was standing on the road, leaving the duo critically injured, said sub-inspector Jahirul Haque, in-charge of Chittagong Medical College Hospital (CMCH) outpost.Later, the injured were rushed to the hospital where physicians declared them dead, he added.last_img read more

first_imgLA Johnson/NPRCollege in the US.If you’re like most Americans, you don’t have a 529 college savings plan.If you’re like most Americans, you don’t even know what it is.All the more reason to keep reading.That’s because, with the new tax law, Republicans have made important changes to 529 plans that will affect millions of taxpayers, not just the ones saving for college. Before that news, though, a quick primer.A 529 plan lets families save money for college. Think of it as a love child, born in the mid ’90s to your federal and state governments. And they named it, in a flash of creativity, after its relevant section in the Internal Revenue Code.States generally manage the plans, while the Feds let the money grow long-term, tax-free. Thirty-three states also try to encourage savers with a little short-term reward (or not so little, in some cases): When families in those states make a contribution, they get a deduction or credit on their state income taxes, too.“That lets people know, ‘Look, this is a tax advantage that you can unwrap for yourself right now and be a gateway to additional tax advantages later on,’ ” says Troy Montigney, who oversees Indiana’s 529 program. His state offers families a $1,000 tax credit for contributions.But that credit means less tax revenue coming in. It’s a trade-off for states; they figure it’s worth the lost revenue if a tax break gets more people saving for college.Now, it’s these state-based tax breaks that are driving real concern among state leaders about Washington’s recent tax overhaul.What has changedAfter Congress’ rewrite of the tax code, parents can now use 529 plans to cover tuition not only at colleges and universities, but also at private elementary and high schools. That’s a big, sudden expansion, and it has some experts worried.“This change allows private school families to put their money through 529 accounts and avoid state income taxes,” says Nat Malkus, who studies education policy at the American Enterprise Institute, a conservative-leaning think tank. “It is a mess, no matter how you slice it. It’s a change from the federal level that puts a number of states in a pretty tough position moving forward.”That’s because, Malkus says, if this move entices lots of new families to sign up and many current families to contribute more, then states could end up losing a lot more money to tax breaks.“I think it would immediately create an unintended hit to the state’s budget,” agrees Greg Berck of the New York State Council of School Superintendents. “States plan ahead, sometimes multiple years ahead, and New York state will be required to provide a state tax deduction [to parents of students in K-12 private schools] unless the legislature acts to amend our state law.”NPR spoke with representatives from half-a-dozen states that offer a tax credit or deduction for 529 contributions. While some were more worried than others about the potential budgetary hit, all expressed frustration that the expansion came top-down from Washington, giving them no time to plan or budget for it.“This will have a huge impact on state-run 529 plans. And for states that offer a tax deduction, a major impact on state tax receipts,” says Michael Frerichs, who is Illinois’ state treasurer.Frerichs says 529s were built on the idea of patience — of parents slowly saving for college — and that using them to pay for kindergarten is a significant change.“If [families are] putting money in one month and taking it out the next, they don’t really have that advantage of long-term investing,” Frerichs says. “And it’s really just using them to get around state taxes.”To get around state taxes. That raises a natural question…Whom does this help?Most Americans send their kids to public schools. And there’s little concern that this change will drive many of them into private schools, since using a 529 to save for the early grades just doesn’t make a lot of sense. For early grades, the funds simply don’t have enough time to grow — except for high-income savers who can afford to set aside a lot of money from the get-go.The real benefit, according to the state experts and independent economists NPR interviewed for this story, is for affluent families — many of whom already have kids in private K-12 schools. They can now use their old 529, or open a new one, to help pay that tuition, all while getting a nice state tax break.Troy Montigney of Indiana says he’s hearing from a lot of curious parents.“We’re already fielding — I’ll just be honest — a tremendous amount of calls on a daily basis,” Montigney says. “About, ‘Can I, you know, take a withdrawal right now to pay for a K-12 tuition expense?’ “The challenge for state 529 managers, treasurers and lawmakers is they’ve had just days to come up with answers. And it’s difficult to know how much this expansion of 529s’ uses will actually expand the pool of people who use them.Nat Malkus, at AEI, believes states will take a financial hit and will have to make some tough choices.“They’re either going to have to accept a loss in their income tax base or do something unpopular to repair the hole,” Malkus says.Lots of states, from Colorado to South Carolina, Michigan to Mississippi, could end up feeling the pinch. One of the few states that won’t, though, is Texas, where the idea began with Republican Sen. Ted Cruz.Texas doesn’t give families an extra break on their income taxes when they contribute to a 529 because Texas doesn’t have an income tax.Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Sharelast_img read more

first_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. PausePlay% buffered00:0000:00UnmuteMuteDisable captionsEnable captionsSettingsCaptionsDisabledQuality0SpeedNormalCaptionsGo back to previous menuQualityGo back to previous menuSpeedGo back to previous menu0.5×0.75×Normal1.25×1.5×1.75×2×Exit fullscreenEnter fullscreen Other animals (besides humans) such as chimpanzees and dolphins have demonstrated in various ways that they are capable of dreaming up solutions to problems in their head and then carrying them out. Called “aha” moments by researchers, such thinking, a form of insight, is one of the hallmarks of higher intelligence. Most people who have ever worked with elephants will attest to the fact that they are indeed intelligent creatures; though no one (at least in the research community) had ever witnessed an elephant using insight to solve a problem. This has perplexed scientists for several years, and has caused them to study the seeming paradox. It appears now that the team working with Kandula has seen it in action, that previous research had been attacking the problem from the wrong angle.In the new study, the team did what countless others before had done. They set some fruit up out of reach of the test subject elephants then lay some bamboo sticks about hoping one of them would get it in his or her head to use the stick to knock the fruit down so they could eat it. Every attempt at this failed. The next go round fared much better. Explore further Citation: Study shows elephants capable of insight (2011, August 24) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2011-08-elephants-capable-insight.html Elephants in Experimental Conditions. Image: PLoS ONE 6(8): e23251. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0023251 More information: Foerder P, Galloway M, Barthel T, Moore DE III, Reiss D (2011) Insightful Problem Solving in an Asian Elephant. PLoS ONE 6(8): e23251. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0023251AbstractThe “aha” moment or the sudden arrival of the solution to a problem is a common human experience. Spontaneous problem solving without evident trial and error behavior in humans and other animals has been referred to as insight. Surprisingly, elephants, thought to be highly intelligent, have failed to exhibit insightful problem solving in previous cognitive studies. We tested whether three Asian elephants (Elephas maximus) would use sticks or other objects to obtain food items placed out-of-reach and overhead. Without prior trial and error behavior, a 7-year-old male Asian elephant showed spontaneous problem solving by moving a large plastic cube, on which he then stood, to acquire the food. In further testing he showed behavioral flexibility, using this technique to reach other items and retrieving the cube from various locations to use as a tool to acquire food. In the cube’s absence, he generalized this tool utilization technique to other objects and, when given smaller objects, stacked them in an attempt to reach the food. The elephant’s overall behavior was consistent with the definition of insightful problem solving. Previous failures to demonstrate this ability in elephants may have resulted not from a lack of cognitive ability but from the presentation of tasks requiring trunk-held sticks as potential tools, thereby interfering with the trunk’s use as a sensory organ to locate the targeted food. © 2011 PhysOrg.com Study: Elephants might seek revenge (PhysOrg.com) — Kandula, a seven year old Asian elephant living in Washington D.C.’s National Zoo, has proven that elephants are as smart as those that spend a lot of time around them have believed. In an experiment carried out by researchers at the zoo, the little elephant figured out all on his own, without resorting to trial and error, how to go get a cube to use as a footstool to help him reach some food that was just out of reach. The research team, led by Preston Foerder of the City University of New York, has published the results of their study on PLoS ONE. Play This video shows the elephant’s first use of the cube as a tool to acquire food. In the second experiment, the team set the fruit up out of reach as before, but this time, tossed a heavy duty cube into the enclosure. At first nothing happened; in fact, it took eight 20 minute sessions before Kandula, suddenly appeared to get an idea after studying the fruit for a few moments. He immediately ambled on over to where the cube lay, then rolled it over to a position just below the fruit, stepped up with his front feet so as to prop himself up, then very easily grabbed the fruit. It may be that Kandual is exceptionally bright however as the neither of the other two elephants came up with the solution to the problem.The authors note in their posting that now that they have seen an elephant using insight, they themselves have had an “aha” moment of their own. Expecting elephants to use a stick to help get food, they say, is akin to asking a person with eyeballs in his hands to look at something after handing them something to hold. Elephants use the tip of their trunk to both touch and smell while searching for food; filling it with a prop would essentially blind them in their search. Duh.last_img read more