first_img5 March 2013South African company First Distribution has signed an African distribution deal with US firm Innovolt, whose technology platform protects electronic equipment from power supply problems.“While power outages not only impact productivity for businesses in the region, they limit growth in a nation that accounts for a third of sub-Saharan Africa’s economic output and ranks among the world’s top 25 countries in gross domestic product,” First Distribution said in a statement on Monday.“In today’s ‘always-on’ business society, the need to have a constant and uninterrupted power supply has grown to the point where protecting your electronic equipment is vital,” said First Distribution’s networking general manager, Charlie Murray.Innovolt’s technology platform enables electronic equipment to last longer by protecting the devices from 99.5% of common power disturbances.“Innovolt continues to grow its global footprint to protect from power-related issues on an international scale,” said Innovolt chief operating officer Jeff Spence.“It’s our goal to make companies in South Africa more efficient and to help them cut down costs related to bad power.”First Distribution has grown its networking portfolio over the past year and is looking to leverage Innovolt’s technology to expand its presence in South Africa and move further into the rest of Africa.“First Distribution’s networking division upholds a certain standard when it comes to selecting vendors with whom to conduct business, and Innovolt meets our criteria for quality and innovation,” Murray said.SAinfo reporterlast_img read more

first_img26 August 2013 Farming the Wild, a community-driven project backed to the tune of R22-million by the government’s Green Fund, aims to transform lives in rural Somkhanda in KwaZulu-Natal through the establishment of a community game reserve. Environmental Affairs Minister Edna Molewa launched the project in uPhongolo local municipality in KwaZulu-Natal on Friday. Managed by the Development Bank of Southern Africa, the Green Fund provides finance to facilitate investment in greening initiatives. The Department of Environmental Affairs said the Somkhanda Community Game Reserve represented a green economy solution suitable for the rural areas across the country.Transforming rural communities “The sustainable use and conservation of wild animal and indigenous vegetation resources have the ability to … transform the poor rural economy of South Africa.” The land on which the game reserve was founded was restored to the community of Somkhanda through the land reform process in 2005. The community decided to place the majority of the land under conservation and create a game reserve to drive development in the area. The Somkhanda community has formed partnerships with the Wildlands Conservation Trust and the World Wildlife Fund to guide them in establishing the reserve. Through this partnership, various skills development projects have been introduced to members of the community.Introducing endangered black rhino The Somkhanda game reserve is a participant in the Black Rhino Range Expansion Programme, which is introducing endangered black rhino to the reserve. Some of the game already purchased includes buffalo, impala and zebra. “Revenue can be generated from hunting, live game sales, game products and ecotourism,” the department said. “The project will create approximately 80 jobs. Thus far, 28 permanent and 15 temporary jobs have been created.” The project will be implemented by the Wildlands Conservation Trust, who will coordinate all financial expenditure of the project.‘Sustainable development path’ On Friday, Molewa also launched the South African Green Economy Modelling (SAGEM) Report, which explores the question of whether equal or higher growth could be achieved with a more sustainable, equitable and resilient economy. “South Africa views a green economy as a sustainable development path that is based on addressing the interdependence between economic growth, social protection and natural ecosystems,” the department said. “The SAGEM was therefore developed to explore the transition to a green economy for South Africa, with special attention for its ability to meet low carbon growth, resource efficiency and pro-job development targets.” The transition to a green economy in South Africa is linked to many policies, strategies and plans, including the National Development Plan, the New Growth Path, the National Climate Change Response Policy and the Industrial Policy Action Plan. The SAGEM report is closely aligned to these policies and plans. It seeks to present a modelling process and test the national targets and the effects of investing in a green economy in South Africa. The department and its stakeholders have committed to continuing initiatives that will simulate green economy investments. The department said it will regularly update the SAGEM report, as and when new relevant policies and scenarios arose. Source: SANews.gov.zalast_img read more

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest The small business sector in Ohio is vital to many stakeholders. The Center for Innovative Food Technology (CIFT) and the Ohio Farm Bureau Federation sponsored the Ohio Signature Food Contest which showcases many new, innovative products ready to take that next step — actual product development.CIFT President & CEO, Rebecca Singer announced the winners selected in recognition of their product concepts: Sarah Steinbrunner and Taylor Crooks of Sandusky, Ohio with their Bean Nut Butter: A delicious non-GMO and vegan nut butter that is free of the top eight allergens. Uniquely incorporates garbanzo beans which are high in protein and fiber, but lack high calorie and fat content association with regular nuts. Tina Smith and Nate Bissell of Jefferson, Ohio with their Sweet and Spicy Maple BBQ Sauce: A unique, all-natural barbecue sauce made with a kick of hot peppers but offering a special ingredient – the sweetness of pure Ohio maple syrup. Following a review of written applications and presentations by food entrepreneurs and chefs to a panel of judges, the highest scoring concepts were selected based on the viability of the product, commercialization potential, business strategy, and overall appeal to the marketplace.As a result of the award, technical assistance from CIFT will be provided to the startup businesses ranging from business planning, product/process development, shelf stability testing, labeling review, regulatory assistance, and batch product preparations for sampling. Later, production will take place at the Northwest Ohio Cooperative Kitchen (NOCK) in Bowling Green, Ohio. The NOCK is a commercially-licensed kitchen that educates and provides technical assistance to new and growing food businesses.last_img read more

first_imgMonday is Ada Lovelace’s 197th birthday. You can thank her for the idea of reprogrammable computers and for publishing the first algorithm. Two centuries later, there are massive, world-changing companies whose beating hearts are algorithms like the ones Lovelace described.The computer algorithm as we know it was invented by a woman. But due to a confluence of political, economic, social and religious forces, today’s algorithm companies are staffed disproportionately by men. So are the media outlets that cover them. That inevitably leads to a skewed history.“Diversity in the workforce is important for building a product that caters to the needs of everyone,” says Tamar Yehoshua, director of product management for search at Google. “That’s really important for building a product that everybody can use.” Suffice it to say, tech is not there yet. “When I was in college, I was one of two math majors in the whole school who are female, and I was very cognizant of it,” Yehoshua says. “But it didn’t deter me in any way because I loved what I was doing.”That’s the rub with institutionalized discrimination, though: It’s an extra cognitive load on people.As part of pondering this problem, I visited Google, arguably today’s most influential algorithm company, to ask three women, all engineers and managers, about their careers. I learned that Googlers are very lucky. Not everyone who works in technology has a support systems as robust as Google offers.Here are some lessons they shared about how to preserve social power for any outnumbered group in a tech company.Formal Support SystemsGoogle’s biggest asset is its ability to understand huge amounts of data. This is as important to Google’s human technologies as it is to its computer technologies.When Google looked at the data this year and realized that it could retain 50% more women employees by extending the length of maternity leave to five months, it did so. It wasn’t just a human decision that this was the right thing to do. Google looked objectively at the situation and decided it was good for the company. As I joked with the Googlers, it’s as though reality has a pro-motherhood bias.That doesn’t mean Google always knows how to apply its big data skills intelligently. When Susan Wojcicki, in whose garage Larry Page and Sergey Brin created Google itself, returned from maternity leave, the founders built a day care center on campus in order to help Googler parents. But later, Google ran the numbers on its day care program and its (male-dominated) leadership decided it had to raise rates by 75%. By treating this human resource as an economic experiment, Google freaked out many of its parent-employees.So data-driven programs are important, but they’re no substitute for human-driven ones. Fortunately for Googlers, Google pays attention to both sides of the equation.Groups Are Key For Payal Patel, a product manager at Google, organized groups for support and problem-solving are the key. Underrepresented people in a big-company culture need backup.“I grew up in small-town Iowa,” says Patel, who saw few options for getting out beyond studying math and physics. When she got to the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign to get her bachelor’s degree in computer engineering, she noticed the gender imbalance for the first time. “Less than 20% of the students were female.”She counteracted that force by joining mentorship groups and larger organizations like the Society of Women Engineers. “It is true that people tend to connect easier to people who are similar,” she says. “Creating a strong peer network through [college] with upperclassmen, as well as out in the industry, helped me a lot,” Patel says.After school, Patel went to work as an engineer at John Deere and Northrop Grumman “That was very different from Google,” she says today. “I was a software engineer for a little over four years. I did have the strong technical background, but I wanted to get into product management, more of the business side.” So she went to MIT’s Sloan School of Management in 2011, then started at Google as a product manager.Her friends in the business and finance world “know for a fact that they won’t last two or three years because of the lifestyle, but yet they want to have that challenge. What really attracted me to Google was, I love the technology, I love a challenge, I want to have an impact, yada yada yada. But when I’m a mother, I can dial in from my meeting, and it’s very normal.”Google offers and supports employee resource groups (ERGs) for women, Gayglers, Greyglers, different ability levels, and geographic, cultural and ethnic groups of all kinds. Patel has participated in the ERG for women, and she’s on an internal Google Group for expectant moms, a status she has recently attained for the first time. “My experience as an expectant mom is amazing at work,” she says. “I think this support network helps Google retain women a lot better. Both my husband and I love Google for that.”But what about people who don’t work at a place as supportive as Google? The strategy for finding support is similar, but it can take more effort to build informal groups yourself.Informal Support Systems “From a numbers perspective, I don’t think there’s any question” that men dominate tech, says Pavni Diwanji, an engineering director at Google running spam-fighting efforts as well as Profiles and Pages on Google+. “It’s just there. I don’t think it’s very interesting to keep thinking about the problem. I think what’s more interesting is to think about what I can do about it.”“I’m not part of a formal mentor program, though one does exist at Google,” Diwanji says. “I do what I call informal, need-be mentoring. I try to have at least a few women to help when they need help.”Diwanji was the only woman in computer science at her university in Western India, “which didn’t really surprise me,” she says. She didn’t have any preconceived notions about tech, so she attributed the imbalance to issues in Indian society.Then she went to Stanford for her master’s degree, “and now we’re talking about a few women.” It wasn’t much different. She started her career as a software engineer at Sun Microsystems, which was “slightly better again.” How did she climb through all that to get to such a great position at Google? Beyond her own talents and ambitions, she adds, “I’ve always been very lucky. I’ve had good mentors.”Her father was her first tech mentor, taking her to work with him at IBM twice a week and letting her play with the punch cards. While she was at Sun, she volunteered outside of work for legendary computer scientist Anita Borg, a huge role model. Groups can be a great help, says Diwanji, but “I think the large impact is one-on-one.”By sharing experiences with trusted figures, women (like any other minority group in tech) can compare notes on the way they handle challenging experiences day to day. “The place where women sometimes fall through is they’re not proactive about their problems,” Diwanji says. Having the support of a mentor helped her through crises, so now she helps others in turn.“You have to find someone who’s going to put a little bit of time into you,” she says. “If you can’t, then go outside of your workplace.”Yehoshua agrees. “Sometimes you need someone who is objective.” She participates in a mentorship program for younger project managers, and she also provides mentorship informally. “I’ve always, at every step of the way, had a mentor. They’re going to give you feedback, and they’re going to help you pursue your career goals.”Is Google A Utopia? HardlyEven Google has not been known as a friendly environment for women at its highest levels. In the CEO transition from Eric Schmidt to Larry Page, Google took heat for pushing women out of the inner circle, most famously employee number 20, Marissa Mayer, who left this year to become CEO of Yahoo.Google spokespeople explained that change as a coincidence. Schmidt’s operating committee was organized around functions: legal, HR, engineering, marketing and so forth. Page’s is organized around products. Mayer and others got caught outside of the product columns. There are other powerful female Googlers who don’t buy the simple gender explanation. “I think all tech companies are a meritocracy,” says Yehoshua, who is a product management director on Search, arguably Google’s most important product. Speaking specifically about Google, “I have never seen an issue bringing up in any way the fact that I’m a female, or that I’m a mother, or anything like that.”Patel thinks there are some cultural factors that make Google special in this regard. “It has to do with the company and their recruiting standards,” she says. “I feel like Google has a high standard from the beginning. I definitely think there’s less bias” among Google-caliber people. She believes a place with high standards will attract more women compared to “more traditional” companies.Diwanji says “Sun had a very different culture to it. It was a very aggressive culture. I wouldn’t call it a male-dominated culture, but you had to eat or be eaten, so to speak. Google doesn’t have that.”Cultures preserve and enforce biases. In a more hostile company culture, it’s critical for disempowered people to create informal networks to support each other. Even in the Googles of the world, formal structures are necessary to make sure that an idyllic perception of the place doesn’t give way to complacency.We’ll need these support systems until our whole society can get to the root of the problem: a formal and informal educational system that teaches children that their gender (or sexual orientation, or race, or religion) determines in any way the kinds of careers they can have.Lead image – of Madeleine Albright with women at Google – courtesy of Google. Related Posts IT + Project Management: A Love Affair Massive Non-Desk Workforce is an Opportunity fo… Tags:#Google#women in tech center_img 3 Areas of Your Business that Need Tech Now jon mitchell Cognitive Automation is the Immediate Future of…last_img read more

first_imgBy: Bari Sobelson and Hannah Hyde Are you trying to build capacity so that your organization can improve the lives of service members and their families?Perhaps you work on an installation trying to establish better collaboration with a local municipality, or are focusing on the geographically dispersed members of our armed services in the guard and reserve?  Perhaps you want to better understand how your installation operates so you can connect your resources to the larger community and share what you have to offer? If this is the case then you are already taking your first steps to build capacity in your community, but doing so will require you to constantly adapt to CHANGE! Once your mission is aligned with those that need you the most, your impact will be much greater! Sounds good, right? But are you wondering what this has to do with you?If you are interested in learning how to adapt and grow with all of this change you may be experiencing with your efforts, you won’t want to miss this amazing opportunity!  Join the Military Families Learning Network for a FREE four-day virtual conference all about managing change!  This virtual learning and networking experience is designed for professionals working with military service members and their families. Throughout the conference, keynotes, interactive sessions, and activities will explore professional and organizational change, which relates to community capacity building from multiple angles. LEARN strategies for managing change, GROW your understanding of your capacity for change, and begin to THRIVE as you connect with colleagues facing similar challenges.  To learn more information about this exciting opportunity, click here.This blog was written by Social Media Specialists Bari Sobelson of the MFLN Family Development Team and Hannah Hyde of the MFLN Military Caregiving Team.  Find out more about the Military Families Learning Network on our website, Facebook, and Twitter.last_img read more

first_imgPagasa: Kammuri now a typhoon, may enter PAR by weekend Security was tight at the arena as a SWAT team stood guard outside.“We’ve already undertaken a lot of preparation, and with the way the world looks today this type of incident (Monday’s attack) is the kind of thing we have to prepare for. So it has been part of our planning all along,” Stockholm police spokesman Kjell Lindgren said.United manager Jose Mourinho said Tuesday he and his players were finding it hard not to think about the attack, which targeted fans leaving a pop concert by the American singer Ariana Grande and left 59 people injured.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next MOST READ For Mark, a 19-year-old Manchester fan living in Stockholm, this was no ordinary match. “It was very special because of the events that happened in Manchester and now they qualify for Champions League,” he said. Vijay Patel, a 29-year-old Manchester fan from the UK, said the team came out even stronger in the aftermath of the attack. “It should motivate them… they’re not just winning for the team they’re winning for the city,” he said. Team supporters were celebrating hours earlier at a fan zone in Stockholm’s leafy Kungstradgarden park where they played football and took photos.ADVERTISEMENT Heat’s Big 3 era ends as deal struck for Bosh to go—report ‘Coming Home For Christmas’ is the holiday movie you’ve been waiting for, here’s why More than 5,000 measles deaths in DR Congo this year — WHO LATEST STORIES South Korea to suspend 25% of coal plants to fight pollution SEA Games: PH beats Indonesia, enters gold medal round in polo Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students PLAY LIST 01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes LOOK: Vhong Navarro’s romantic posts spark speculations he’s marrying longtime GF Shaun Payne, a 29-year-old United supporter, said Monday’s attack undoubtedly scarred the team, but he was optimistic that they would win.“They have nothing to lose tonight. They’ll go for it,” he told AFP.“It’ll provide extra motivation to represent the city and to hopefully bring the trophy back with us,” he says. Tight securityRob Coppen, a 28-year-old Ajax fan from Amsterdam donning the team’s kit, said the terror attack took the joy out of the final. “(The attack) has taken the spark off the game. It’s been a while since Ajax has been in a Euro final so it’s a pity.“But what can you do? Nobody asked for this, neither Manchester nor Ajax,” he said. Amy Edwards, a Manchester fan, was worried about safety at the final, but said she refused to let fear control her life. “I’m worried a little bit in case something happens tonight, but I guess it’s always a risk you take anyway and go to high profile games,” she said.“But you can’t stay inside,” she added. “Obviously the events in Manchester has put a dampener on everything but hopefully we can win and bring the trophy back tonight.” Manchester’s Wayne Rooney holds the trophy after winning 2-0 during the soccer Europa League final between Ajax Amsterdam and Manchester United at the Friends Arena in Stockholm, Sweden, Wednesday, May 24, 2017. (AP Photo/Michael Sohn)A crowd of Manchester United fans were cheering outside a Stockholm stadium on Wednesday as their team won the Europa League, a relief for the supporters after the Manchester terror attack 48 hours earlier.“It’s fantastic to see them winning. We were always confident that we would win,” said George Malloy, a 69-year-old from Dublin. ADVERTISEMENT View comments Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Cayetano dares Lacson, Drilon to take lie-detector test: Wala akong kinita sa SEA Games “I think it will be a good lift for the people of Manchester,” he added. Manchester fans were screaming and whistling in joy, while their Ajax counterparts were biting their nails as the English club won 2-0. FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingOutside the entrance of the modernly decorated Friends Arena in the Stockholm suburb of Solna, fans were upbeat and cheerful under sunny summer skies, but nervous about both the outcome of the match and security issues.Ahead of Wednesday’s match, players held a minute’s silence in honour of the victims of Monday’s suicide bombing at the Manchester Arena which left 22 people dead. Lakers win 9th straight, hold off Pelicanslast_img read more

first_img The Government’s revenue target for this fiscal year will not be altered. Tax authorities and the Customs Department are examining the effects of the ban Minister Phillips pointed out that while the objective of the regulations is to reduce smoking overtime Story Highlights Minister of Finance and the Planning, Hon. Dr. Peter Phillips, says the Government’s revenue target for this fiscal year will not be altered.He was responding to a question submitted by Opposition Spokesman, Audley Shaw, in the House of Representatives on July 30, as to whether the ban on smoking in specified spaces would impact sales, and by extension the revenues expected from the tobacco industry.Minister Phillips pointed out that while the objective of the regulations is to reduce smoking overtime, the pace at which this will happen is not yet known.“What has been the general pattern is a sharp dip, which then levels off over time…and it is also the case that there is considerable leakage (of revenues) because of the extent of the contraband trade, which we are seeking to close,” he explained.Dr. Phillips noted that the tax authorities and the Customs Department are examining the effects of the ban, but the two weeks since it was implemented, would not give sufficient information as to a trend.“Therefore, we continue to monitor the situation…but I want to make it absolutely clear that the revenue number of the Government as a whole remains, and that there will be no slippage in relation to our overall targets for revenue,” he asserted.last_img read more