first_imgShortest hole at longest US Open course could bring trouble MOST READ “It’s the business of basketball obviously so nothing is for sure, but here I feel like we can work that out and we’ll have a chance to do this again next year,” Durant said. “It’s easier said than done obviously, but that’s the goal. We want to keep this thing together and see how we can continue to keep getting better.”The group that recruited Durant in the Hamptons that day last summer has the same philosophy about winning more championships. Along with Curry that day were Iguodala, Draymond Green and Klay Thompson.“I do know me and KD had a conversation along with Draymond and Klay and Andre last year before he even showed up that that was kind of the identity of who we are as a team that we understand how important it is, the guys that are here,” Curry said. “You don’t want anybody to have to sacrifice in that sense, you don’t want to force anybody to take that approach but at the end of the day we know what’s best for us as a group going forward. We’re going to do everything we can to keep this team together. I’ll have that mindset, KD’s going to have that mindset, I know Dre, Shaun, all the guys that are up for negotiating a new contract. We’ll see what happens. The beauty of what I know of this team, we all want to provide for our families, we want to get all that we can out of this game while we still have the legs to do it, but there are no egos when it comes to that side of the equation when it comes to us as professional athletes.”Curry and Durant also heard from former President Barack Obama with congratulations, though Durant said he was most excited that among 200 messages was a text from a high school girlfriend he didn’t realize still had his number.While the Warriors haven’t formally met to discuss whether they will visit President Donald Trump’s White House as is customary for championship teams, Curry said his mind hasn’t changed from when he was asked earlier this year about the possibility. Coach Steve Kerr also has been outspoken about issues with Trump.ADVERTISEMENT Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Heart Evangelista admits she’s pregnant… with chicken Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss PLAY LIST 02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games Golden State Warriors’ Kevin Durant smiles during an NBA basketball news conference on Wednesday in Oakland, California. APOAKLAND, California — Stephen Curry will likely go from being the NBA’s biggest bargain to signing the richest contract in the league at more than $200 million. And he looks forward to the nice payday.Yet the two-time reigning MVP and new NBA Finals MVP Kevin Durant said Wednesday (Thursday Manila time) they would consider taking less money to keep the core of the champion Golden State Warriors intact.ADVERTISEMENT Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next WATCH: Firefighters rescue baby seal found in parking garage Ethel Booba on hotel’s clarification that ‘kikiam’ is ‘chicken sausage’: ‘Kung di pa pansinin, baka isipin nila ok lang’ Heart Evangelista admits she’s pregnant… with chicken World’s 50 Best Restaurants launches new drinking and dining guide “Somebody asked me about it a couple months ago like the hypothetical if a championship were to happen what would I do and I think I answered I wouldn’t go. Still feel like that today,” Curry said. “But obviously as a team we’re going to have a conversation. This is a moment that we all need to enjoy together. Nothing should distract from what we were able to accomplish together and the different kind of ceremonies that have happened around championship-winning teams. We don’t want that to taint what we’ve accomplished this year so we’ll handle that accordingly and responsibly and do the right thing for us individually and as a group.” “It would mean everything. What we’ve built here is truly special, it’s unique, it’s something that you don’t want to see end at all,” Curry said. “All the pieces that we have are important to the equation of winning a championship and competing for a championship every single year. It is a business. There are decisions that need to be made every single year and you’ve got to assess the situation as it is.“… As we go into the talks and this whole process, which is obviously new for me, I will approach it to get the most out of it I can as an individual, as a player, and something that I’ve been working for for a very long time. In the context of keeping the team together, if there are decisions that need to be made, we’ll talk about it for sure.”FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutTwo days after capturing the franchise’s second title in three years against LeBron James and the Cleveland Cavaliers, the Warriors prepared to part ways for what will be a busy offseason for general manager Bob Myers and the front office.Durant said he has “no question” in his mind he will be back with the Warriors. He hinted he would opt out of a deal that pays him the maximum he can get in order to help Golden State’s chances of re-signing players such as Andre Iguodala or Shaun Livingston — two key reserves on both title teams. 1 dead in Cavite blast, fire LATEST STORIES What ‘missteps’? Lacson: SEA Games fund put in foundation like ‘Napoles case’ View commentslast_img read more

first_imgPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hosting UST, which had its three-game winning streak snapped, dropped to a 5-3 record for the fourth spot.Like two heavy-handed sluggers in the 12th, Ateneo and UST continued to trade blows well into the latter stages of the fifth set.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSPalace wants Cayetano’s PHISGOC Foundation probed over corruption chargesSPORTSSingapore latest to raise issue on SEA Games food, logisticsThe two teams exchanged leads several times until Ateneo took advantage of Eya Laure’s service error at the 10-10 score line and took it up a notch for the 13-10 advantage after Kat Tolentino’s ace.Cherry Rondina salvaged a point for UST, 13-11, but it was her own doing that doomed UST when her final attempt hit the antenna giving Ateneo the victory. Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. LATEST STORIES Eya Laure was UST’s second fiddle with 21 points.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next SEA Games hosting troubles anger Duterte “UST really came prepared that’s all I can say but my players really fought well and the resiliency was there,” said Ateneo head coach Oliver Almadro. “I really admire the players because of the trust they gave me and I just told them to never give up and just be patient and have fun.”“I really give this game to UST also, it just so happens that the breaks of the game went into our favor.”The game didn’t just see streaks get extended and broken, it also saw a couple of historic performance from Ateneo’s Maddie Madayag and UST’s Rondina.Maadayag’s 11 blocks that broke the record for most blocks in a game in the Final Four era while Rondina’s 35 points became the single-game scoring record for a Golden Tigress also in the Final Four era.Madayag would finish with 23 points to lead Ateneo while Kat Tolentino added 20.ADVERTISEMENT Wintry storm delivers US travel woes before Thanksgiving Google Philippines names new country director MOST READcenter_img Trump tells impeachment jokes at annual turkey pardon event PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games PLAY LIST 02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games02:11Trump awards medals to Jon Voight, Alison Krauss FILE – Ateneo Lady Eagles. Photo by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netMANILA, Philippines—Ateneo kept the streak alive as it survived University of Santo Tomas in a thriller, 19-25, 22-25, 27-25, 25-22, 15-11, in the UAAP Season 81 women’s volleyball tournament Wednesday at Filoil Flying V Center.Not only did the Lady Eagles improve to 7-1 after their seventh straight win, they also extended their dominance over the Golden Tigresses to 15 games dating back to Season 74.ADVERTISEMENT Colombia protesters vow new strike after talks hit snag View comments Miguel Romero Polo: Bamboo technology like no other Bloomberg: US would benefit from more, not fewer, immigrants Jalen Green posterizes 7-foot-2 Kai Sotto againlast_img read more

first_imgEverton, Crystal Palace move for Valencia striker Michy Batshuayiby Carlos Volcano10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveValencia striker Michy Batshuayi is being offered a return to England.On-loan at Valencia from Chelsea for the season, Batshuayi has been told coach Marcelino wants him to cut short his loan this month.The Belgium international would prefer to stay, though the Guardian says two Premier League clubs are now in contact about bringing him back to England.Everton and Crystal Palace are both keen, while Olympique Marseille are also watching developments.For their part, Valencia want to move on Batshuayi to free up a loan slot for Marcelino’s squad. TagsTransfersLoan MarketAbout the authorCarlos VolcanoShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

first_imgArt Briles is no longer the head coach at Baylor, and if the latest report by Joe Schad is true, it looks like some of his assistants may be out soon too. Schad, formerly of ESPN, posted a long note to Facebook Tuesday afternoon, reporting that a former Baylor student named Dolores Lozano claims she was assaulted by former football player Devin Chafin and that both Briles and assistant Jeff Lebby knew about it. She even alleges that she and Lebby exchanged texts about the situation. She says that she brought allegations to the Waco Police, but Chafin was allowed to continue playing. She says the school never had a formal hearing either.Schad also reports details of the alleged assault and includes photos of the injuries Lozano reportedly suffered from the incident. dolores lozano facebookHere is a photo provided to me by former Baylor student Dolores Lozano pic.twitter.com/lHAwUnI0g3— Joe Schad (@schadjoe) June 7, 2016Jeff Lebby, currently the Baylor passing game/RBs coach, did not have immediate comment about Lozano’s claims— Joe Schad (@schadjoe) June 7, 2016The fallout at Baylor does not appear to be over just yet. Obviously, this is awful. Expect more repercussions here.last_img read more

first_imgRosie & the Riveters premiered their video for I Believe You on billboard.com last week. (Rosie & the Riveters) Twitter Saskatoon-based singing trio Rosie & the Riveters is gaining international attention for a new song and video in support of the #Metoo movement.The song I Believe You was written by band members Alexis Normand, Allyson Reigh and Farideh Olsen. Login/Register With: Advertisement Advertisementcenter_img LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Facebook The video for it premiered on billboard.com on Thursday. The song also appeared on Spotify Canada’s new music Friday playlist.“I think it just really speaks to the gravity of the situation and the importance of the message we’re sending,” said Reigh. “This message is so much bigger than our band and it’s a message that we hope is healing for survivors and we hope that people who need to hear it are the ones who hear it especially.” Advertisementlast_img read more

first_imgAPTN National NewsNiagara Falls may be the honeymoon capital of Canada, but for this week, the Assembly of First Nations is turning it into an arena to discuss natural resources.More than 800 Indigenous leaders and business people sat down to talk business.APTN National News reporter Donna Smith was there.last_img

first_imgWASHINGTON – A Canada-U.S. women-in-business group created by Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and U.S. President Donald Trump released its first set of recommendations Wednesday, proposing more affordable child care and a new binational procurement initiative.It’s the first of five anticipated reports from the Canada-U.S. Council for Advancement of Women Entrepreneurs and Business Leaders, created during Trudeau’s first meeting with Trump last February.It is delivering its findings to the two leaders. This first report is on supporting women-owned businesses, and subsequent ones due through July will look at science education, attracting entrepreneurs, and improving access to capital.This first report makes four recommendations: affordable child care, getting startup-funding groups to measure and encourage women’s access to investment, diversity programs in private-sector supply chains and a new public-sector procurement initiative.The procurement idea calls on Canada to create a program like one in the U.S. where five per cent of public contracts are set aside for women-owned businesses in sectors where women are under-represented.It says the countries’ programs should be linked, with women able to qualify for the contracts in either country.The report notes the differences between existing child-care policies in Canada and the U.S.: Canada has a national system allowing paid parental leave, unlike the U.S. But the report says access to day care remains a challenge in both countries.”We recognize that Canada and the United States have taken different approaches to family policy and unpaid care work and do not suggest there is a ‘one-size-fits-all’ solution,” said the report.”In the United States, we heard women say that the high cost of childcare or in-home support prevented them from scaling their companies to their full potential. In Canada, we heard the need for more affordable quality child care programs… (Solutions) could include things such as maternity leave policies and tax incentives. It could also include measures to level the playing field between caregivers — for example, paternity leave policies.”The 20-page report lays out numerous gender disparities in the business world.It points to the minuscule percentage of major companies owned by women. The percentage is even smaller in Canada than the U.S. Citing federal data from both countries, it notes that a mere 14 per cent of companies in the U.S. with 100-500 employees are female-owned, and just seven per cent in Canada. The numbers for smaller businesses are only slightly higher.There’s a similar disparity in startup funding: 19 per cent of startups that get seed funding have a female founder, according to figures it cites from CrunchBase. The ratio drops for companies getting subsequent funding — for later-stage funding, 13 per cent or less of it goes to companies with a female founder.The paper urges funding groups to keep these statistics, and track them, quoting one CEO: ”You cannot improve what you don’t measure.” It also encourages companies to establish more networking opportunities.The challenge of networking is laid out in another part of the paper that cites survey stats showing there’s no clear consensus among men and women when asked whether it’s appropriate to have dinner, have lunch, drive in a car, or have a drink with a women who’s not their spouse.”It is worth noting that business relations between men and women are receiving greater scrutiny in the wake of recent sexual harassment scandals,” says the paper.”It is critical that women be encouraged and supported as they come forward about these instances. At the same time, some men have described heightened caution when interacting with women, especially in professional settings. A big takeaway is the need to challenge harmful social attitudes and biases, but also to be mindful of overcompensating behaviours that can further isolate women in business.”The paper released Wednesday was part of the project led by GE Canada President Elyse Allan, and NRStor Inc. CEO Annette Verschuren.The U.S. president’s daughter Ivanka, who participated in the launch of the project, saluted the arrival of the first report: ”Thanks … for your recommendations on growing women-owned businesses,” she tweeted.”We value private sector input in advancing the success of women entrepreneurs in US & Canada.”Note to readers: This is a corrected story. An earlier version said the council was created by Trudeau and Ivanka Trump and that it was expected to produce just four reports.last_img read more

first_imgFORT NELSON, B.C. – The Government of Canada has announced that it will be investing in safety at the Northern Rockies Regional Airport.According to the Government, the $356,680 in funding will go towards the purchasing of a new grader which will be used to maintain the runways, taxiways, and aprons.Minister of Transport, Marc Garneau, says it is important to invest in airports in order to support economic growth and to maintain the safety for all users. “Our Government recognizes that local airports are major contributors to the economic growth and social well-being of smaller communities. In addition to supporting travel and tourism, local airports are key connectors for business, health care, social services, and emerging resource development sectors. These investments will improve access to safe, efficient and accessible air transportation options, and will help us deliver on our promise to build safer, healthier and stronger communities across Canada.”Funding for the Airport comes from Transport Canada’s Airports Capital Assistance Program.To date, the Federal Government has invested more than $11.7 million in ACAP funding for 15 safety projects at the Northern Rockies Regional Airport.To learn more about ACAP funding, you can visit the Government of Canada’s website.last_img read more

first_imgBajipura (Guj): Congress president Rahul Gandhi on Friday said his party’s `Nyay’ scheme will help in revival of the economy and create jobs in the country which has been badly affected by demonetisation and GST decisions of the Narendra Modi government.Addressing a poll rally here, Gandhi repeated his “chowkidar chor hai” (the watchman if thief) jibe to target Prime Minister Narendra Modi and alleged he has given Rs 30,000 crore to businessman Anil Ambaniin the Rafale fighter jet deal. Also Read – Uddhav bats for ‘Sena CM'”We have promised to give Rs 72,000 crore (a year) to poor people under the Nyay scheme which will change the economic condition of the poor in the country,” he said. Gandhi said the scheme, Nyuntam Aay Yojana (Nyay) – a key feature of the Congress manifesto for the Lok Sabha polls – was devised after consultations within the party. “I had called all the economists of the Congress party and asked them what is the amount that we can give to the poor people of the country. Also Read – Farooq demands unconditional release of all detainees in J&K”They came up with the figure of Rs 72,000,” he said, adding Modi had in 2014 made a false promise of giving Rs 15 lakh to people, but the Congress will definitely give Rs 3.60 lakh (estimated cost of `Nyay’). The Congress chief attacked the Modi government over its 2016 note-ban exercise. “One fine day, Narendra Modi announced that notes of Rs 1,000 and Rs 500 have been scrapped as they do not help me create more black money. So I will introduce a new note of Rs 2,000 as through it we can make more black money,” Gandhi said, mocking the demonetisation move. “They introduced Gabbar Singh Tax. Both the steps were big blows to our economy,” he said, criticising the BJP- led government over its implementation of the Good and Services Tax (GST). “Common people had stopped purchasing goods after demonetisation due to cash crunch, so Indian companies producing goods were closed down. Hence, unemployment rate is highest at 45 per cent in the country now,” Gandhi said. “However, our Nyay scheme will revive economy and create more jobs. Money that will go to people under the Nyay scheme will help people purchase things, our companies will be revived and people will get job,” he said. Gandhi said the Modi government is working for a few rich industrialists. “This government works for rich industrialists only. Do common people require chowkidar? Chowkidar is not required in front of house of farmers. This is Anil Ambanis chowkidar,” Gandhi, said targeting Modi. “The chowkidar gave Rs 30,000 crore to Ambani. Chowkidar chor hai,” the Congress said, alleging corruption in the Rafale deal with France. Anil Ambani has rejected Gandhi’s allegations and emphasised that the government had no role in the Rafale- manufacturer French company Dassault picking up his company as a local partner. “Under the new crop insurance scheme, the government has given districts and states to a few rich industrialists. Modi has given the entire Kashmir to Anil Ambani,” he said. Gandhi said if his party comes to power, it will bring a law to ensure farmers do not go to jail if they default on payment of loans.last_img

first_imgNadi (Fiji): Asserting that Asia continues to be the growth engine of the world, Economic Affairs Secretary Subhash Chandra Garg Saturday said the ADB must expand its private sector operations to boost economic development.Addressing the Board of Governors of the Asian Development Bank (ADB) here, he said there is a rising need for the agency to focus on strengthening human capital and develop social safety nets. “Therefore, we urge the ADB management to expand it social sector engagements in countries like India, while at the same time, continuing with the focus on making cities smart, providing 24×7 water and power supply, enhancing connectivity, and mitigating the risk of climate change. Our regional cooperation initiatives must aim to integrate the countries of the region with the global value chains,” he said. Also Read – Commercial vehicle sales to remain subdued in current fiscal: Icra”While ADB should continue helping the member countries harness their growth potential by providing larger financial resources, it must expand its private sector operations across the region. By investing more through equity and infrastructure trusts, ADB can play a meaningful role in development of private sector initiatives,” Garg, India’s Alternate Governor on ADB’s Board of Governors, said. ADB’s private sector operations reached USD 3.14 billion in 2018, a 37 per cent increase from the previous fiscal, and stood at 14.5 per cent of its overall commitment. Also Read – Ashok Leyland stock tanks over 5 pc as co plans to suspend production for up to 15 daysEmphasising that ADB has helped the developing countries in building infrastructure and reducing extreme poverty for the past 52 years, Garg said innovation in financing will be the key to success of long-term growth strategy. “This will require careful fine-tuning of both public and private sector financing. Private financing has to be carefully shepherded to the right sectors like manufacturing, services and new digital economy industries with active support of equity financing from ADB and other multilateral agencies,” he said. Private investment in more difficult sectors like infrastructure and human capital improvement, however, will not flow unless these projects are sufficiently de-risked for the private sector with both direct investment as well as provision of guarantees and other structured support, he said.last_img read more

first_imgNew Delhi: The Election Commission has directed disciplinary action against the presiding officer of a polling station in the Chandni Chowk parliamentary constituency who forgot to delete test votes, necessitating the need for a repoll, officials said Sunday. The polling station 32 in the constituency saw a repoll on Sunday and recorded a voter turnout of 42.14 per cent. According to an official, the EC directed disciplinary action against the presiding officer after a report was sent about the error to it by the Chief Electoral Officer, Delhi. Tanvi Garg, district election officer of the Chandni Chowk parliamentary constituency, said a show cause notice has been to the polling party seeking a reply in the matter.last_img read more

first_imgTRIPOLI- Leaders from the Libyan port of Misrata have urged militias from the city to leave Tripoli within 72 hours, after they were involved in deadly weekend clashes in the capital.A militia of former rebels from Misrata who fought the regime of dictator Moamer Kadhafi in 2011 opened fire on protesters in Tripoli, sparking unrest that killed at least 43 people.Community leaders, officials and ex-rebel commanders from the coastal city urged the “withdrawal of all ex-rebels from the city of Misrata who are in Tripoli, whatever their group is… in under 72 hours,” in a statement issued late on Sunday. The statement suggested the clashes resulted from a plan to “undermine (Misrata’s) image and show it as if it were the only obstacle to the construction of the state”.Demonstrators protesting against militias on Friday in Tripoli’s Gharghour neighbourhood were fired upon from villas occupied by fighters from Misrata, who killed several protesters before rival militias swept in.At least 43 people were killed and another 450 were wounded in the deadliest unrest to hit the capital since the fall of Kadhafi in October 2011.The defence ministry had ordered the demolition of the villas, previously home to supporters of the Kadhafi regime before they were seized by rebels in2011, before cancelling the decision later.Rebels who fought in the 2011 uprising were initially hailed as heroes for their role in toppling the Kadhafi regime.But many of these groups have since carved out their own fiefdoms in the vast country, refusing to hand over their arms to Libya’s weak central government and paying little heed to its authority.last_img read more

The Ohio State men’s and women’s cross-country teams look to redeem themselves at a championship meet this weekend and qualify for the NCAA Championships. The Buckeyes will run at the Great Lakes Regionals on Saturday in Toledo. The men and women are looking to rebound from their fifth- and ninth-place finishes, respectively, at the Big Ten Championships on Oct. 30. Finishing close to the top of the field is the goal for both teams. A top-two finish results in an automatic bid to the NCAA Championships, but with highly ranked teams on both sides, OSU is aiming just outside second place. The No.1-ranked Wisconsin Badgers and No. 7 Indiana Hoosiers highlight the men’s field, with Big Ten Champion Michigan State as the leader on the women’s side. “I think we need to be third to make it to nationals,” OSU men’s head coach Robert Gary said. “That’s certainly the No. 1 goal for the season, so we’ll see.” Redshirt senior Taylor Williams agreed with his coach. “The goal is always to get one of those top-two automatic spots. Realistically, those spots will go to Wisconsin and Indiana,” he said. “I think third would definitely put us in a good position.” Women’s assistant coach Chris Neal said the women want to repeat their regional-meet success from years past. “We’ve been top five (at the Great Lakes Regional) two years in a row and we’re looking to extend that streak to three years,” he said. Tightening up the spread from their No. 1 to No. 5 runner will be the key to success for OSU this weekend, according to the coaches. “I’d like to see us get five to six guys on a 20-second spread,” Gary said. Neal echoed similar thoughts for the women. “We’ll need to run the first half of the race like we did (at the Big Ten Championships) and clean up the back half of our pack,” Neal said. Tori Brink, a junior on the women’s team, is confident her team’s spread will tighten. “We all train together and run together and we are always right there with each other, it shouldn’t be any different in a race,” she said. The men will not be at full strength for the third meet in a row. Jake Edwards, a former Big Ten Runner of the Week, injured his hamstring at the Notre Dame Invitational on Sept. 30 and hasn’t run competitively since. With Edwards out, junior Donny Roys and Williams will lead the way for the men. Roys was the Buckeyes top runner at the Big Ten Championships, finishing 19th in 24:21. Williams covered the 8K-course in 24:24 on way to a 21st place. Junior Tori Brink and redshirt senior Jordan Jennewine finished 23rd and 32nd, respectively, at the Big Ten Championships and should lead the way for the women on Saturday. Based on how they perform on Saturday, the Buckeyes cross-country seasons will either come to an end, or will continue with a berth in the NCAA Championships in Terre Haute, Ind. on Nov. 21. read more

first_imgRoad accident LogoTwo people were killed following after a car and a microbus collided with a parked CNG-run auto-rickshaw at Panchlaish in the port city of Chattogram early Sunday, reports UNB.The deceased are auto rickshaw driver Md Hanif, 40, son of Md Mostafa of Halishahar Brick Field area and car passenger Md Fardin, 18, son of Abul Bashar Milon of Nasirabad Batagoli area in the city.The collision took place when a microbus coming down from ‘King of Chittagong’ club hit a car which was going towards the club and the auto-rickshaw was standing on the road, leaving the duo critically injured, said sub-inspector Jahirul Haque, in-charge of Chittagong Medical College Hospital (CMCH) outpost.Later, the injured were rushed to the hospital where physicians declared them dead, he added.last_img read more

first_imgMichael Thomsen, the Project Manager for Dart announced the stable release of the general purpose programming language, Dart 2.2. This version, which is an incremental update to v2, offers improved performance of ahead-of-time (AOT) compiled native code and a new set literal language feature. Improvements in Dart 2.2 Improved AOT performance Developers have worked on improving the AOT performance by 11–16% on microbenchmarks (at the cost of a ~1% increase in code size). Prior to this optimization, developers had to make several lookups to an object pool to determine the destination address. However, the optimized AOT code is now able to call the destination directly using a PC-relative call. Extended Literals to support sets Dart supported the literal syntax only for Lists and Maps, which caused difficulties in initializing Sets as it had to be initialized via a list as follows: Set currencies = Set.of([‘EUR’, ‘USD’, ‘JPY’]); This code proved to be inefficient due to the lack of literal support and also made currencies a compile-time constant. With Dart 2.2’s extension of literals to support sets, users can initialize a set and make it const using a convenient new syntax: const Set currencies = {‘EUR’, ‘USD’, ‘JPY’}; Updated Dart language Specification Dart 2.2 includes the up-to-date ‘Dart language specification’ with the spec source moved to a new language repository. Developers have also added continuous integration to ensure a rolling draft specification is generated in PDF format as and when the specification for future versions of the Dart language evolves. Both the 2.2 version and rolling Dart 2.x specifications are available on the Dart specification page. To know more about this announcement in detail, visit Michael Thomsen’s blog on Medium. Read Next Google Dart 2.1 released with improved performance and usability Google’s Dart hits version 2.0 with major changes for developers Is Dart programming dead already?last_img read more

first_img State Rep. Mike McCready today announced he will host office hours this month in Bloomfield Township and Birmingham.McCready invites residents to meet with him to share their perspectives and ask questions at the following locations and times:Bloomfield Township: Monday, May 13, 6:30-8:30 p.m. at Bagger Dave’s, 6608 Telegraph Road.Birmingham: Tuesday, May 28, 6:30-8:30 p.m. at the Baldwin Public Library in the board room, 300 W. Merrill St.Appointments are not necessary for office hours. Residents who are unable to meet can contact McCready’s office to schedule an appointment.#### Categories: McCready News 02May McCready announces May office hourslast_img read more

first_imgMotorola Mobility shipped 6% more set-tops in 2011 than the previous year.Announcing fourth quarter and full-year results, the company said it saw a decline in set-top shipments during the fourth quarter, with figures down 3% year-on-year.Motorola’s set-top business falls within its Home segment, which reported fourth quarter revenues down 11% to US$897 million (€684 million). Full year revenues were down slightly to US$3.5 billion from US$3.6 billion.Motorola Mobility’s full year revenues for its entire business, which includes mobile devices, were up 14% to US$13.1 billion.Motorola Mobility is in the process of being acquired by Google. It said it expects the deal to close in early 2012.last_img read more

first_img(Interviewed by Louis James, Editor, International Speculator) L: We are speaking today with Casey Research Chief Economist Bud Conrad. Bud, in my mind, the thing that makes your insights so valuable is that you’re not actually a career economist with a Ph.D. in the subject. You are an engineer, and you bring an engineer’s systems analysis perspective to bear on economic questions. So, how does the system of the world’s economy look to you today? Is it really on the mend, as so many economists are saying? Bud: That’s a very broad question. Thanks for mentioning my background. We so often see economists arguing with economists about their points of view. I think it helps to step back and have a fresh look at things, focusing on what the data tell us, rather than focusing on their ideas based on theories… which I don’t think are correct. L: That reminds me of the old joke about a physicist, engineer, and an economist stranded on a deserted island. The only food they have is a can of beans, but they have no can opener. The physicist has an idea to use fire to open the can, but that would ruin the beans. The engineer has an idea to use rocks to open the can, but that would ruin the beans as well. The economist says: “Let’s assume a can opener.” Bud: [Chuckles] I have to say, I really do think that the intellectual bedrock of modern economics is very weak. The reality today is that governments around the world – not just the United States, but also in Europe with the ECB and Japan with Abe’s mandate to the Bank of Japan requiring it to maintain an inflation rate of 2%, and other governments as well – they are all moving in the direction of printing more money. The United States is not the worst offender, but only because we have a rich country that can afford substantial deficits. We have a system in which the government finds it easy to print money in an effort to meet everyone’s needs. Those needs include the baby-boomer generation going into retirement, with $75 trillion in future obligations, and a large and ever-growing military – much larger in proportion to GDP than what any other country in the world is maintaining. Coupled with this, we have a lack of interest in raising taxes among politicians, who see that as unpopular with voters. The politicians have no will to fix our deficits. The deficit has been papered over by the Fed printing money. However, the problem is not a matter of just this last year. Nor is it just this last recessionary period that started in 2008. The bubbles really started forming back in the 1990s when Greenspan turned on the spigots after the 1987 stock market crash. That brought on the first modern big bubble, the one in tech stocks. The dot-com bubble was very large, and its bursting should have been a lesson and a warning about what was to come. In response to the crash that followed the popping of the dot-com bubble, Greenspan lowered interest rates to around 1%. At the time, that was a new record in easy-money policy on the part of the Fed. This led to the housing bubble. The bursting of this bubble was not well predicted, not by most people, but it was by me. L: When and where, Bud? Bud: I predicted the end of the housing bubble back in 2006, when you and I were both working on the International Speculator, before we pulled out the big-picture economics and started publishing that material in The Casey Report. There was an issue in 2006 called The Coming Currency Crisis in which we said the housing bubble was bursting. But in 2007, Bernanke was still saying that the problems in the housing sector were contained. Of course, it is the nature of his job to avoid frightening people with dire comments, but in looking at the minutes of the Fed meetings it’s clear that they really didn’t have a clue as to what was going on. L: Ah, I remember that one. We got a lot of things right – made me laugh to see Bernanke on TV after the crisis hit in 2008, saying that no one could have seen it coming. Bud: Indeed. I knew we were in a bubble, just looking at the subprime lending phenomenon. Many in the mortgage industry knew we were in a bubble. The Fed’s response to the bursting of the housing bubble and everything else that’s gone wrong since 2008 has inflated a third bubble – the bond bubble, which I think is now peaking. It’s harder to predict when a bubble will burst than to identify the fact that we’re in one, which is what I’m saying now. We have the lowest interest rates in 250 years – lower than at any time since the founding of the country – created by the Federal Reserve forcing interest rates to zero in the short term. In addition, we have the Fed encouraging banks to help lower rates through buying Treasuries. On top of this, we also have some $350 trillion of swaps derivatives of interest rates – more than half of all the derivatives out there are interest-rate derivatives. Banks use these swaps to transmit lower rates to other debt instruments based on what can they can get from the Fed. This drives all rates down. L: Sounds pretty questionable… Good thing the government saved us from evil bankers in 2008, cleaned house, and set us all on the path to righteousness. Bud: I don’t think our financial situation is any more solid than before the crisis. We’ve still got many undisclosed, not yet written down, toxic financial items out there. It may be better than the middle of the worst part of the crisis, but that’s not saying much. L: So what happens next? Bud: We’ve seen 30 years of declining interest rates. I think we’ll begin to see them move in the other direction this year. I think rates on everything from high-yield corporate bonds to government bonds – which are considered the safest – are way lower than they should be. Consider the high probability of inflation ahead, the currency exchange rate risk, and the eventual default risk. All three risks are totally undiscounted by the market, because of the distortion created by the Fed. That will hit its limit at some point. Some people say the Fed can keep up its juggling act forever. I don’t agree. L: Doug has been describing the bond market as “a triple threat to your capital” for some time now. I understand that it is difficult to predict exactly when a market bubble will pop, but can you give us some indicators to watch for? What would be conclusive evidence that the popping is actually under way? Bud: That’s a tough question. I’ve done extensive work on when countries explode. The premier take away from Carmen Reinhart and Ken Rogoff’s best-selling book, This Time Is Different, is that when debt gets to 90% of GDP, that’s when things get risky. Well, we have $15 trillion in GDP and $16.4 trillion of debt. That’s well-publicized now, because of the political wrangling over the debt ceiling, which we’ve actually already exceeded. L: So we’re already in the red zone? Bud: We do have some advantages over other countries. We have a big military, which does cost us, but also tends to make other powers more cooperative. Most of our debt is denominated in our own currency, which gives us a big advantage over a smaller country that has debt denominated in US dollars – if their currencies fall against the dollar, their troubles are compounded. So we can probably push things further than the 90% threshold. That’s not a hard number by the way, just an average within a fairly wide footprint. However, with our level of debt to GDP, most countries would already be looking at something on the order of 10% interest rates, whereas we’ve got something in the neighborhood of 2% for the 10-year Treasury. This is an extreme distortion from what the market would dictate under such circumstances. So, will interest rates start rising now that we’re over 100% debt to GDP? I know rates can’t go much lower, so I expect they will be heading up from here. Look at the trillion dollars a year in new debt we’re accumulating, and consider that in four years we will have more than $20 trillion in government debt. At 5% interest, that would require a trillion dollars a year in interest payments. We only collect $2.5 trillion in federal taxes. I don’t see how we could reach such a number without something breaking. That’s four years away, but since we know it’s coming, we should already be preparing for the problems that can be anticipated. All that’s needed for things to break down is some event that causes a panic. Such an event might be some foreign government with a huge trade surplus with the US that it has invested in US Treasuries deciding that the 2% they’re getting paid to hold them is not worth it in the face of 5% inflation in the things they need to buy, like raw materials. If something like that were to happen, it could spark a race to head for the exits on US bonds. This highlights a real Achilles heel we have, compared to other countries that don’t have as huge a trade deficit as we do. L: So a good sign that the balloon is going up would be that the interest rates start rising despite the government’s efforts to keep them down? Bud: Yes. There will come a time when the Fed announces a new easing program and the market ignores the announcement so that rates rise rather than fall, and stocks fall rather than rise. At that point the game is surely over. Watching interest rates is certainly important in terms of keeping track of the turning tide. If they move from 2% toward 4% – which is not a very large change in historical terms – they could then accelerate and push the whole mess off a cliff very quickly. L: The Keynesians will just answer that all this deficit spending will stimulate the economy, which will then grow at a more rapid rate and enable us to afford the debt. But is that even possible? Wouldn’t we need a double-digit GDP growth rate, such as China used to enjoy, to pull that off? Bud: Well, in the simplest terms, if your debt is growing faster than your GDP, you won’t ever be able to pay it off. It’s simple math. Now if you look at the kind of debt problems governments get into, there comes a critical point at which people recognize that the problem is too big to be solved. The most recent high-profile example of this is what happened to Greece. In such a case, there are only a few things you can do. The first is to find someone bigger to bail you out. Greece found that the ECB was able to bail it out – at least for a time, but they’re still in trouble. The United States is too big for that. The second thing you can do is to hope you can grow out of it, as you just suggested some might argue. The US’s debt growth has been bigger than GDP growth for decades. It’s just not credible to argue that we can grow our way out of our debt. The next alternative is to simply declare default, as Argentina and Russia have done, among others. This is what many countries along the southern fringe of Europe are likely to do, in my opinion. The public in these countries is rebelling against the austerity plans the ECB is requiring. Default of some kind is their only alternative. Default is very destructive in the short term, greatly reducing the ability of governments to borrow and spend in the future. It’s also politically very unpalatable, especially in places like the US, where most people can’t even conceive of their government defaulting on its obligations. This leaves only one alternative: printing money to try to kick the can down the road. This is the path we are on. It too is highly destructive, but that destruction is hidden and delayed. It is not, however, sustainable, and I think we will see a breakdown in the not-too-distant future. L: How “not-too-distant?” Bud: My current intuition is that we will begin to see this happening in the near term, meaning this year. As that gets going, it will build momentum and accelerate. That’s my current prediction: the third bubble created by the many years of easy money policy by the Fed, the bond bubble, will pop soon. L: In discussing this last week, Doug and I likened this to a house of cards. Everyone knows it’s shaky, and nobody wants to get caught when it comes down. That means that when it starts, the collapse should come very quickly. Do you think we could see a 2008 level of crisis arising from the bursting of this bubble as early as this year? Bud: I don’t want to predict exactly what will happen when, but I am willing to say that we have seen the lows in interest rates and they will start rising this year. L: That’s still a bold statement. Do you have a theory as to why European countries – most of which are far more overtly socialist than the United States – are struggling to embrace austerity measures, while in the US, aside from some small budget cuts generating big headlines, there’s no real consideration being given to actually trying to live within our means? Bud: I would simply say that the Europeans have better PR. I really don’t think they are that much different. The ECB has said it will do whatever it takes to defend the euro – that means printing more euros. The public statements about austerity have been effective enough that they haven’t had to do much printing in the last six months, but Europe looks no better off to me now than it did six months ago. France is weakening greatly, and that’s one of the pillars of strength being relied upon to help carry the others. The ECB is kind of a paper tiger. It’s supposed to be able to print up money and rely on the strong countries to back them up. But can anyone take the idea of France bailing out Italy and Spain seriously? It’s just another house of cards. Most people don’t realize that not only is there the ECB, but each country has its own central bank. While in theory the central bank of each country is not allowed to print euros, a loophole that is not understood is that the TARGET2 money transfer system causes them to enlarge their balance sheets. This is the same thing as printing money. This is particularly true of the German Bundesbank, which is owed money by the ECB, which is owed money by Spain and other importing countries. The system is unsustainable, and I think the process of collapse is starting, though it may take a while to gather momentum. I admit that I’m surprised by the current relative strength of the euro. I think that it will weaken from here. I see enough problems in the world’s financial system and our own to say that while the dollar may not look particularly weak in foreign exchange, all of these paper currencies are tragically flawed. At some point people will wake up to their lack of intrinsic value and not care whether it’s pesos or dollars you’re offering them – they won’t take anything backed by nothing. L: Gee, Bud, you’re as gloomy as Doug! Bud: [Laughs] It’s not a contest! It’s just what the data are telling me: Europe is in recession. Next up is Japan, which is trying to bail itself out for the 43rd time in the last 20 years by printing money. I think the US will be the third domino to fall – I think we’re heading for stagflation by the end of this year. L: We should also probably warn people against speculating in real estate, because even though those assets are real, real estate is going to get slaughtered if interest rates rise. Bud: Good point. But the fact remains that the size of this bubble is bigger than the other two that have popped already. The debt market is on the order of $53 trillion across all sorts of debt. The stock market is only $15 trillion. The home real-estate market is $20 trillion. So when the debt market crashes, it’ll be two or three times worse than the previous bubbles bursting. The resulting wealth transfer will be much larger than most economists can even understand – most don’t really focus on debt. It’s critical that the measuring stick they’re using, the dollar, is made of rubber. They are going to be caught off guard, and many people are going to be wiped out. L: Okay, so how do we position ourselves to invest? Bud: I don’t know if I would pick an inverse interest rate ETF or futures market short position yet. The fundamental thing is not to keep your cash in a bank account that is essentially paying you a zero interest rate. I look to invest in safe-haven assets like the precious metals, essential needs like energy, and real estate – particular things like productive agricultural real estate. I might even add stocks in general to the list… L: Doug disagrees on that last one. Bud: Mainstream economists are saying that the worst is over and that the blue chips will head higher. I’m saying the worst is not over, and with inflation on the way, higher nominal stock prices will not translate to big returns in real terms. They might do better than your .01% CD, but the gains will not be attractive in terms of increased purchasing power. I didn’t recommend stocks because I think they’re going to be big winners, but simply as a way to avoid losing money on bank deposits. I’d rather own gold, personally. But the important thing to understand is that as paper money is being made worthless, we need to protect ourselves. L: Okay, I get it. I think I need a beer… or better yet, a hug from my children – that always makes me feel better. But I do appreciate your candid assessment. It helps to explain some of the things Doug’s guru-vision has been telling us. Thanks. I think. Bud: You’re welcome. Thanks for giving me a chance to give my warning. I just hope people will listen. Bud Conrad is the author of Profiting from the World’s Economic Crisis. He also shares his economic and investment insights in The Casey Report, a monthly advisory that focuses on profit opportunities in emerging trends. For more information on the topics discussed, listen to Bud’s recent interview with Jim Puplava of Financial Sense.last_img read more

first_img Recommended Links Communists, Trotskyites, Maoists We remember discussing the radicals’ strategy back in 1969. This is where the nostalgia comes in… Last night, we stayed at a tiny hotel in Paris, near where we first got to know the city 43 years ago. We had gone for a semester abroad, after discovering that the tuition at the University of Paris was only $80. That meant that even with airfare, it was cheaper to go to the Sorbonne than to the University of Maryland. The semester turned into a lifelong relationship, marked by equal periods of affection and disgust. We didn’t speak French at the time, but we had had four years of it in high school. That seemed like plenty. (Although it later proved comically insufficient.) But we were adventurous back then. And penniless. So, we got ourselves to Paris… and hung out at the bars around St.-Germain-des-Prés. It was a very different city in the 1960s. It was a world leader in fashion, technology, movies, food, and philosophy. But Paris had a problem back then, too. Communists, Trotskyites, Maoists, anarchists, syndicalists, and students – in 1968, they rebelled, ripped up the streets to build barricades out of the paving stones (the streets were covered with asphalt soon after), and engaged with the police in pitched battles. By the time we arrived a year later, skirmishes between gendarmes and radical groups were still going on. The organized rebels would race around a corner, throw rocks and Molotov cocktails at police who formed up into protected phalanxes with their clear plastic shields. Then the cops would suddenly charge the insurgents, swinging their billy clubs at anyone they could reach. Trained and practiced, the terrorists would retreat quickly. This left the police with nobody to rough up except innocent onlookers. That is how your editor nearly got hospitalized. Walking down the street, he was mistaken for a radical… knocked to the ground and worked over by three policemen, who eagerly went about their work with happy cudgels. Revolutionary Strategy Sitting in a café with a bandaged face, we discussed the revolutionaries’ strategy with a young French intellectual of Trotskyite tendencies. Even almost a half-century later, we recalled the conversation when we passed the café (still in business) where it took place. “Oh… sorry to see you got beaten up,” he said. “But it’s just collateral damage. We’re making headway. “The police don’t like it when we attack them. It’s a point of pride, more than anything else. So, they overreact. But the more they show on TV people like you getting beaten up by the cops, the more the working class comes over to our side. We’re going to win.” The revolutionaries did not win. They did not topple the Fifth Republic. But they eventually got much of what they wanted – free schooling… free drugs and medical attention… a high-cost, zombified, crony economy… a bureaucratized, tightly regulated society… even a 35-hour workweek. And now look at it. “Yes, it’s a mess…” repeated the voice behind us. Regards, Bill Bonner’s Analyst Issues Urgent Buy for This Wednesday This stock is in the same position as two other well-known stocks right before they jumped 121%… and 205%. Bill Bonner is investing $250,000 in it through his family trust later this week… but if you click here, you could get in on it before him. – Major Shift in World’s Largest Financial Market (40x Larger Than the Stock Market) Could it send gold to $11,000/oz.? Four of the world’s smartest billionaires might think so. They’re all “backing up the trucks” on gold. Learn more here.center_img Bill Editor’s note: The rising tide of global terror is only strengthening the “Deep State’s” grip on you and your life. And in his latest warning, Bill explains exactly how this shadowy group of unelected elites is corrupting our financial system… and pushing the U.S. economy closer and closer to an imminent breakdown. But he also offers some individual financial solutions you can put in place on your own to help you and your children live in a safe, prosperous, and free country. Watch here now. — Editor’s note: Agora founder Bill Bonner was just in Paris…While he was there, he was reminded of the time he spent there in the 1960s… Back when he was knocked to the ground and nearly hospitalized by three policemen… VIENNA – Real money must reflect the realities of the real economy. If it becomes detached from economic reality, like a clock that no longer tells the right time, it becomes a hazard to everyone. Appointments are missed. Trains crash. You show up at the airport and find the plane left two hours ago! Air France is on strike. Our flight – with Austrian Airlines – left an hour late as a result. “This is a mess,” we said to nobody in particular, as we waited for a plane this morning. “Welcome to France,” said a voice behind us. Murdered by Barbarians Puzzling out the secrets of money and interest rates was interrupted by the news… and nostalgia. The gruesome details: An 86-year-old French priest was forced to kneel in his church. Then his throat was cut. “Murdered by Barbarians,” screamed a headline in the French newspaper Le Figaro. “We must be pitiless,” said former president Nicolas Sarkozy. “It’s war.” He may have picked up a few lines from Saint Bernard, rehearsed nearly 1,000 years ago. In the Burgundian town of Vézelay, on March 31, 1146, St. Bernard of Clairvaux delivered his famous oration on responding to the Muslim threat: Will you allow the infidels to contemplate in peace the ravages they have committed on Christian people? […] Fly then to arms; let a holy rage animate you in the fight, and let the Christian world resound with these words of the prophet: “Cursed be he who does not stain his sword with blood!” In France – as in the U.S. – saintly politicians compete to see who can most convincingly promise to “get tough.” Of course, getting tough is just what the so-called Islamic State (known in France by its Arabic acronym, Daesh) wants. The strategy is ancient. More than 2,000 years ago, radical Jewish groups conducted a war of terror against their Roman masters, hoping to provoke a crackdown by the authorities… leading to the radicalization of the masses. Did it work? Depends on how you look at it. The Jews got their crackdown. Vespasian and Titus put down their insurrection, leveled Jerusalem, destroyed The Temple and, according to Josephus, killed 1.1 million Jews.last_img read more

first_imgA former nurse at Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville, Tenn., was arrested and charged with reckless homicide and abuse in February for making a medical mistake that resulted in an elderly patient’s death. Criminal charges for a medical error are unusual, patient safety experts say. Some are voicing concern that the move sets a precedent that may actually make hospitals less safe by making people hesitant to report errors. The nurse, RaDonda Vaught, pleaded not guilty. Her next hearing is scheduled for April 11. She told NPR in an emailed statement from her lawyer that Vanderbilt terminated her employment after the incident.The district attorney’s decision to charge Vaught comes after both the Tennessee Department of Health and the federal Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services investigated the incident. The state health department investigation, which concluded in October 2018, did not revoke Vaught’s nursing license.The CMS report emphasizes the hospital’s responsibility in the mistake. “The hospital failed to ensure all patients received care in a safe setting,” the report says. Vanderbilt University Medical Center officials would not comment on the case. The report details how Vaught mistakenly took the wrong medicine out of a dispensing cabinet. She was trying to give the patient, Charlene Murphey, a dose of an anti-anxiety medication, midazolam (brand name Versed), before an imaging scan during a December 2017 hospital stay, the report states. Vaught instead gave Murphey vecuronium, a paralytic drug used during anesthesia that had the same first two letters, according to the report. Murphey died in an intensive care unit the following day.The Nashville District Attorney’s office told the Tennessean it made the decision to bring criminal charges against Vaught specifically because she administered the fatal medication after overriding the safety mechanism in the dispensing machine.Medical errors are common. Some researchers estimate they’re the third leading cause of death in the United States. And many in the patient safety community say they don’t understand what prompted the DA’s office to prosecute this case in particular. DA spokesman Stephen Hayslip told NPR in an email that “the actions of this office will become more evident as the evidence is presented to the court.” He declined to comment further.Nurses around the country have come to Vaught’s defense, speaking out on social media and on opinion pages. The American Nurses Association issued a statement criticizing the charges, saying that “the criminalization of medical errors could have a chilling effect” on health care workers’ willingness to report errors. The phenomenon of criminally charging health care providers after a patient is harmed is rare, “but it grows less unusual every year,” says Stephen Hurley, a Wisconsin lawyer who has defended nurses in similar cases and advised hospitals on the topic.Most high-profile cases tend to involve death, a significant injury or a patient well-known in the community, he says. And prosecutors tend to focus on nurses, he says, rather than physicians or hospital administrators, though he’s not sure why.Suen Ross, the ANA’s director of nursing practice and workplace environment, thinks that it’s unusual for health care providers to be charged with a crime after a medical mistake that didn’t involve malicious intent or intoxication. She calls Vaught’s case “unprecedented” because neither of these factors are cited in the CMS report.Ross says it’s important for health care workers to feel free to report errors without fear of retribution. All health care mistakes — even small ones — should be analyzed to understand the underlying issues that caused them, Ross says. A non-punitive approach encourages transparency, she says, and “that prevents future mistakes or errors from happening.” This approach to preventing errors is well-accepted in the medical and nursing communities, which makes a criminal case like Vaught’s all the more surprising, says Kirstin Manges, a nurse and researcher at the University of Pennsylvania who studies patient safety.”That could have happened to me, or it could have happened to my friend,” Manges says. “Nurses aren’t superheroes. We’re people.”Manges says that most medical errors occur because of systemic problems. Human error is inevitable, she says, and hospitals should account for that by instituting safety checks and protocols.Problems tend to happen in busy, unpredictable circumstances, Manges says. When nurses are fatigued or have many tasks occupying their attention, that’s when safety checks are most important, she adds.”We work in environments that are fast-paced,” she says. “We may not always work in ideal situations.”The safety checks Manges describes can take many forms and are designed under the assumption that doctors and nurses will have occasional slip-ups. For example, many hospitals require a nurse to scan a bar code from the pharmacy and on the patient’s identifying bracelet before giving a medication, or to use preprogrammed intravenous pumps that prevent medications from being administered too quickly. Even the medication override function that Vaught used, Manges says, can have an important function: Nurses need to be able to quickly access medications in an emergency situation when they can’t wait for verification from a pharmacist.And when health care workers do make mistakes, Ross argues hospitals usually shouldn’t punish staff. Disciplinary action is warranted, she says, only when there’s evidence that staff acted irresponsibly.When the Institute of Medicine — now known as the Health and Medicine Division of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine — put out a major 1999 report titled To Err Is Human, Manges says, it became the norm to focus less on punishment and more on learning from mistakes.But Vaught’s case has the potential to change that, she fears.”It shifts that conversation from ‘to err is human’ to ‘to err is criminal,’ ” Manges says. Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.last_img read more