first_imgAndhra Bank has posted 35% growth in net profit during the quarter ended September.The net profit was ₹144 crore, a jump of 35% quarter-on-quarter.The core operating profit of the bank during Q2 stood at ₹710 crore compared to ₹622 crore during corresponding quarter of previous year.The bank said its total income grew by 16% year-on-year. It stood at ₹4,424 crore compared to ₹3,818 crore during Q2 of 2013-14. This comprised interest income of ₹4,146 crore and and non-interest income of ₹278 crore.Total business of the bank stood at ₹260,012 crore, an increase of 13% year-on-year.The deposits grew from ₹129,343 crore to ₹145,084 crore, an year-on-year increase of 12.2%.The gross bank credit during the quarter stood at ₹114,928 crore, a growth of 14% over corresponding quarter last year.last_img read more

first_imgDonald TrumpDonald Trump hurtled through his first week in power, punching out at critics, dishing up “alternative facts,” polarizing public opinion and making good on an electoral promise to shake up Washington.One week into the Trump era and there is a serious case of political whiplash in America’s capital.Just a week ago, an outsider who never before held elected office rode into town. Seven days later, norms and doctrine that have guided the United States for decades are being re-examined.Trump’s down-to-the-studs gut job began with a feisty inaugural address: a call to arms that tested old distinctions between left and right.”Today, we are not merely transferring power from one administration to another or from one party to another,” he said.”We are transferring power from Washington, DC, and giving it back to you, the people.”The establishment “elites” in big cities, in politics and the media were no longer the technocrats in charge of the world’s only superpower, they were the enemy.The new president also put the rest of the world on notice.For the last 75 years, America had been what Barack Obama described as the “indispensable nation” — the glue that bound the global order.The era of Trump would be the era of “America first,” he said, of naked self-interest and zero-sum diplomacy. Old alliances would be reassessed, new alliances would be explored.Before his inauguration, many asked if the presidency would change Donald Trump, or whether Donald Trump would change the presidency.Barely 20 minutes into his four-year term, anyone who was listening had their answer.Rolling thunderBefore arriving to the Oval Office, Trump’s strategists had decided to use the first few weeks to unleash a daily wave of executive orders.The aim was to unbalance opponents, define Trump as a man of action and slake his supporters’ thirst for change.For much of middle America, globalization, automation and the Great Recession had been apocalyptic.Politics had passed them over and worse, they felt steamrollered by “coastal elites” in America’s “culture wars” over abortion, gay rights, immigration, global warming and religion.Trump had won the election by promising to be their champion, and he was going to — as Ronald Reagan said — “dance with the one that brung ya.”For the most part, the CEO-in-chief put forward actions that could have come from any Republican in the country: defunding abortion, preening the military and approving oil pipelines.But it was coated with a thick veneer of nationalist and populist rhetoric, and accompanying policies championed by top aide Steve Bannon.Trump ripped up a trans-Pacific trade deal designed to counterbalance China’s regional economic power, imposed a ban on refugees from Syria and migrants from seven other Muslim countries.He ordered planning to begin to build a wall on Mexico’s southern border and picked a very public fight with Mexico’s president Enrique Pena Nieto, who cancelled a trip to Washington.The United States, a nation founded by migrants, was now willing to shut its doors.Not since Obama’s election or perhaps the Iraq War has America’s image around the world changed so dramatically and so quickly.But Trump supporters saw an outsider sticking up for them and sticking it to the elites.”Get used to it,” said Trump aide Kellyanne Conway, boasting that Trump had delivered a “shock to the system.””And he’s just getting started,” she said.Rocky startBut it was not all positive for Trump. The White House is far from purring. Key positions have yet to be filled and the decision making process is haphazard.Trump aides were forced to publicly row back suggestions of a 20 percent border tax on Mexican goods and defend a chaotic rollout of the refugee and migrant ban.Throughout the week, Trump engaged in intemperate outbursts about the size of his inaugural crowd, alleged election fraud and perceived media persecution.Privately, in call after call, he complained to top aides about press coverage. The impression was of a man focused on his image more than running the country.Trump also seemed like a man for whom becoming US president was not adulation enough.Spokesman Sean Spicer — between tirades and missteps — offered a window onto the soul of the White House.”There’s this constant theme to undercut the enormous support he has,” Spicer said.”It’s unbelievably frustrating when you’re continually told it’s not big enough; it’s not good enough. You can’t win.”According to a Quinnipiac poll, Trump’s approval rating at the end of his first week stood at 36 per cent.But critics saw a more sinister motive for the outbursts, particularly Trump’s unsubstantiated claim that three million people voted illegally in the election.Brian Klaas, an expert on global democracy at the London School of Economics, sees Trump “casting aspersions (without evidence) on electoral integrity is a key way to restrict voting rights and erode confidence in elections.””Attacking the media and blurring the lines of truth with state narratives not grounded in fact is important to sowing public doubt,” he said.Mindy Finn, who ran as an independent vice presidential candidate, summed up Trump’s strategy as “sow chaos, deepen division and consolidate power.”For his harshest critics, the question is now whether Donald Trump breaks the presidency, or whether the presidency breaks Donald Trump.last_img read more

first_imgBy Micha Green, AFRO Washington, D.C. Editor, mgreen@afro.comHundreds of Howard University students are participating in a sit-in for the fifth straight day after last week’s report that approximately $1 million in financial aid funds had been misappropriated, causing a national scandal, Black Twitter uproar, and the Internet’s gift- memes of the alleged student embezzler, Tyrone Hankerson Jr.Led by the student group, HU Resist, the student activists have occupied the Mordecai Wyatt Johnson Administration Building and presented the administration with a list of demands.  The list of demands include, an end to “unsubstantiated tuition hikes”, actively fighting “rape culture” on campus, more housing accommodations for students looking to live in gentrifying D.C. neighborhoods, the “immediate resignation” of Wayne A.I. Frederick, the school’s president, and the Executive Committee of the Board of Trustees.Howard University students hold a press conference about the protest in the Administration building. (Photo by Edgar Brookins for the AFRO)The students are using Twitter as a mobilizing force and are regularly updating their page in order to ask for support, such as financial, food, and sleeping bags, and keep followers abreast of their work and progress.After protesting through the weekend and Easter holiday, the group’s April 2 tweet, asked for help with food supplies.“Thank you to everyone that has provided support and food.  We are in need of hot food for lunch.  We need vegan/ vegetarian options as well.  Please dm [direct message] us if you’re willing to help.”Even in their requests for support, the student group is even giving back to the community.“Yesterday we continued our Food Pantry and donated some of our excess food to homeless members of the community. We managed to feed about 500 people,” the organization wrote.According to The Root, Veritas1867, the person who originally posted the now deleted Medium article that anonymously leaked the financial aid scandal and named Hankerson as one of the main culprits, said that the student protestors are “just getting started”.“The alumni and the board want to make this about numbers but this is really about people, and about how they’ve been abused,” Veritas told The Root on Sunday.Veritas, who prefers the pronoun “they” called Howard’s president “a bully who intimidates people. He’s done that to faculty he’s done that to students for years. And he has gotten away with it. The reason this thing has gone on for so long is that people were afraid of him, but this time we’re not afraid.”Vertias said, “Chase,” the student informant who provided what they called proof of the financial aid scandal, is experiencing intimidation from Howard’s community after his name was leaked through various social media sources.“They want to humiliate him and silence him,” says Veritas. “And sadly, it’s working. He’s in a whole other state, he doesn’t want to talk to press. He’s not at ease,” they said.Veritas said they and HU Resist are now standing in solidarity with Chase and other struggling students.““It’s time for new leadership. Alumni and the administration think this is about financial aid but the truth is that [Frederick] has created a culture at the university where people don’t hold people accountable,” Veritas said.The students met with the administration on Sunday and at least one of their demands, extending the housing application deadline to May 1, was met.“We have no plans to leave until our demands are met,” they said.last_img read more

first_img Free Webinar | Sept 5: Tips and Tools for Making Progress Toward Important Goals Attend this free webinar and learn how you can maximize efficiency while getting the most critical things done right. Brought to you by Business on Main Yes, viruses, worms, phishing and other horrible-sounding threats make for a dangerous world out there for your computer network. But there’s comfort in the fact that 84 percent of network attacks are considered preventable with simple security measures.Yet to be convinced that you need to take protective measures? Then consider the following:It takes 20 minutes for an unprotected computer to get infected after it’s been hooked up to the internet.Forty percent of passwords can be cracked within one hour.In 2007, 127 million personal records were either lost or stolen.Now that I’ve made you aware that something must be done, it’s good to know that protecting your computers doesn’t need to be expensive or complicated. In fact, just like in the physical world, it mostly requires some basic common sense. Below are the four critical tools for locking your computer network up tight.Antivirus software. In my opinion, antivirus software should be mandatory, like car insurance–you can’t get a computer without it. Yes, antivirus software has historically been a royal pain in the processor. It was costly, it updated itself all the time and it would slow your computer to a crawl. But I see antivirus protection as being like flossing: It sucks, but think what you may lose without it. Besides, there are some free (yes, free) antivirus programs that are top-notch, such as AVG (which also has a pay version). And the performance drags have drastically improved in the last year or two, especially with products like Symantec’s Norton Internet Security . Get something on every system in your company and keep it up to date. It’s basic hygiene.Firewall. For both individual PCs and networks, firewalls are must-haves. These are simple programs that, based on a certain set of rules, examine the traffic coming in and out of your computer or network and block any unauthorized access. It’s like having a lock and peephole on your front door. Many internet security software packages, such as Symantec’s, have firewalls built in. Check Point Software Technologies , probably the most recognized brand in the firewall business, also markets a free version of its basic firewall software called ZoneAlarm .Get a VPN. If you or your employees ever access the company servers remotely, you need a virtual private network (VPN). A VPN simply creates an encrypted tunnel between your PC and the network, so that anything you send between the two is protected. It sounds more complicated than it is. And there are free versions of this as well, including Alonweb and PacketiX VPN . Some of these free versions hit you with advertising, but that’s nothing you can’t handle.Passwords, passwords, passwords. I’m not just talking about passwords to log on to the network or a website. Those are obvious. But did you know that your hard drive can (and should) be password-protected? Did you know that you can require your employees to enter a password before they download anything onto their system? And did you know that those passwords must all be different; change regularly; include letters, numbers and symbols; and in general be really difficult to guess? It’s called password strength, and for more on how to make a weak password stronger, see this handy reference guide .How well you protect your network will depend on how well your employees adhere to the guidelines. And sometimes just educating them on good, safe computing habits (like not clicking on links in e-mails from unknown sources or downloading anything from an untrusted site) is not enough. So a little security technology can go a long way toward helping you sleep at night. And most of it won’t cost you a thing, which will also help you sleep. 4 min read July 16, 2010 Register Now »last_img read more