first_imgSecretary of the Senate, Nanbolor SingbehWhile awaiting the Commercial Court’s judgment to establish if J. Nanborlor Singbeh, secretary of the Liberian Senate, misappropriated over a million dollars in equipment and materials belonging to a Czech Republic-based company, MHM Eko-Liberia, another lawsuit has been filed against Singbeh.The latest lawsuit filed before the Magisterial Court in Kakata, Margibi County, was brought by Mrs. Gartee Lorwoe, the widow of the late James Lorwoe, in which she claimed that Singbeh owed her and her five children US$20,000, equivalent to four years unpaid rental fees for fifty acres of undeveloped forest land that contained two large deposits of rocks around the Leiyea Mountain, situated at Seeke Town, District#4, Margibi County.Singbeh, according to the suit, entered into the agreement for a period of five years with an annual rental fee of US$5,000. In addition, the company was to pay Lorwoe a fee of US$1.00 for every ton of rocks sold.Singbeh is expected to appear before the court on Monday, March 11, 2019, at the precise hour of 2:00 p.m.MHM Eko Liberia and James Lorwoe entered into the five-year lease agreement that commenced on July 1, 2013 and was expected to have expired on June 30, 2018.Singbeh is the president and chairman of the board of directors of MHM Eko-Liberia, a company established in 2013 to engage in the production of crushed rocks.He also holds 30 percent of a total of 100 shares, while two Czech Republic nationals, Pavel Miloschewsky and Martin Miloschewsky, hold 35 percent each.Singbeh, then the chairman of the company, was the liaison between the family and the company.But, Mrs. Lorwoe, in her suit against Singbeh, claimed that before the death of her husband, Singbeh, on November 11, 2013 paid US$5,000 for the first year as lease of their forest land in the county.Few days after the payment of US$5,000 for the first year, James Lorwoe got sick and later was pronounced dead.It was when the Probate Court, in Margibi County issued Mrs. Gartee Lorwoe a letter of administration, giving her the legal power to administer the Intestate Estate of the Late James Lorwoe.A copy of the lease agreement, obtained by the Daily Observer, claimed that in the case of a sublease, the MHM Eko-Liberia shall be required to pay the Lorwoe 25% of the difference between the rent covered by the said lease agreement and the sub-lease agreement with a third party.MHM Eko-Liberia, shall also be solely responsible to pay all taxes levied assessed against the property as provided by law during the period covered by the agreement and any other extension.After the first payment of US$5,000, since the death of Mr. Lorwoe and up to present, the suit claimed, Singbeh has persistently refused to pay the lease rental for the period of four years in the amount of US$20,000, despite the expiration of the lease agreement.Mrs. Lorwoe claims that, not being able to pay her US$20,000, Singbeh has been taking away equipment and materials belonging to the company, ofor which she has asked the court to place a stay order against Singbeh pending the outcome of her suit.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

first_img“We have great expectations from the United States,” Babacan said at a news conference following his meeting with Rice. “We are at the point where words have been exhausted and where there is need for action.” Ankara has said Turkey wants to hear specifics about what the United States is prepared to do to counter the rebel Kurdistan Workers’ Party, or PKK, or Turkey will launch an attack. Rebel attacks against Turkish positions over the last month have left 47 dead, including 35 soldiers, according to government and media reports. Many Turks are furious with the United States for its perceived failure to pressure Iraq into cracking down on the PKK, which operates from bases in the semiautonomous Kurdish region of northern Iraq. Street protesters have urged the government to send forces across the border even if it means deepening the rift with the U.S., their NATO ally. Turkey’s military chief has said the country will wait until after Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan meets with President George W. Bush next week in Washington to make a final decision about an assault. Washington worries a Turkish incursion would bring instability to what has been the calmest part of Iraq, and could set a precedent for other countries, like Iran, that also have conflicts with Kurdish rebels. Babacan returned from a trip to Iran last week, lobbying for support for the Turkish side and underscoring that Turkey will act as it sees fit, regardless of U.S. pressure. ANKARA, Turkey – Faced with the prospect of another front opening in the already difficult Iraq war, the United States struggled Friday to persuade Turkey not to send its army across the Iraqi border to attack guerrillas who use the remote terrain to launch strikes inside Turkey. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice urged calm and cooperation in a string of meetings with top Turkish leaders fed up with rebel attacks and insistent that Turkey will do what it must to stop them. She made a similar argument later Friday in a separate meeting with Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki, whose government has said it will not stand for any cross-border assault. Turkish Foreign Minister Ali Babacan sounded impatient, and he offered no public promise of the restraint Washington seeks. “We all need to redouble our efforts, and the United States is committed to redoubling our efforts,” Rice said. She said the United States is working to broaden its sharing of intelligence and has begun discussing longer-term solutions that would involve Turkey, Iraq and the United States. In a sign of potential cooperation, the Kurdish region’s Minister of Culture Falkadin Kakei told The Associated Press in Baghdad that Turkey’s ruling Justice and Development Party has agreed to meet a delegation of Iraqi Kurds to discuss the crisis.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more