first_imgHammersmith’s George Groves and former world champion Glen Johnson speak ahead of their Commonwealth super-middleweight title clash at the ExCel London. (Video courtesy of iFilm London)See also:O’Meara to fight for Commonwealth titleGroves believes he can stop JohnsonJohnson speaks ahead of his fight with George GrovesDuo weigh in ahead of title showdownsGroves discusses Johnson and a potential clash with FrochWatch Groves and Johnson square-up at their weigh-inGroves and DeGale in new war of 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 Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

first_imgChelsea defended superbly in the first half at the Eithad Stadium, denying Manchester City a notable effort on goal despite the champions having most of the possession.Diego Costa, back in the visitors’ starting line-up after a hamstring problem, has been well contained by Vincent Kompany and the two sides have so far cancelled each other out, with the pace of the game slowing after a high-tempo start.Costa did get a sight of goal just before the break but Fernandinho was alert to the danger and denied the Spain striker as he looked to pounce on Branislav Ivanovic’s header down.Blues boss Jose Mourinho recalled Cesar Azpilicueta at left-back, with Filipe Luis dropping back to the bench having started against Schalke in midweek.Chelsea legend Frank Lampard is on the bench for City. Chelsea: Courtois; Ivanovic, Cahill, Terry, Azpilicueta; Ramires, Matic; Willian, Fabregas, Hazard; Costa. Subs: Cech, Luis, Oscar, Drogba, Mikel, Schürrle, Remy.Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

first_imgThe winning car in the South African SolarChallenge, put together by a team fromTokai University, Japan, heading towardsthe Hex River mountains outside CapeTown.(Image: Zellous Racing) Each car in the race was sandwichedbetween two support cars to protect thesmall and fragile vehicles from other roadusers.(Image: Shane Barrett) The race covered 4 175km of tough SouthAfrican territory.(Image: South African Solar Challenge)Jennifer SternOn Tuesday 7 October a fleet of odd-looking vehicles rolled into Pretoria after an epic two-week, 4 175km round-trip across South Africa’s heartland and back along its coastline. This was the end of the inaugural South African Solar Challenge, the longest and toughest solar-powered race in the world, and the first sanctioned by the Federation International de l’Automobile (International Automobile Federation, or FIA).Setting off from Pretoria in Gauteng province on 28 September, the race covered the 530km to Kimberley in the Northern Cape by that evening. The next day they headed to Beaufort West, and the next to the coastal city of Cape Town, where the cars were on display in Canal Walk shopping centre on 1 October.The route back to Pretoria took the long way, east along South Africa’s coastline via Plettenberg Bay, East London, Port Shepstone, Durban and Ermelo.The South African Solar Challenge is similar to those run in the US and Australia for years, but with the distinction that it is sanctioned by FIA, the body that administers all motor sport including Formula 1 racing.The Australian and US races predate FIA’s interest in alternative-fuel racing, so they have their systems well established. Because the South African Solar Challenge is a brand new event, FIA was on board from the beginning. It’s probably only a matter of time until the other big solar races fall into line with FIA requirements, or the association alters its requirements to accommodate the established races.Energy efficiencyWhile the race is probably the most exciting, and certainly the most visually interesting, part of the event, it is in fact a small aspect of it. What it’s really all about is designing and building the cars. These are not production vehicles – every one is designed and built by the team that races it, and most teams are attached to universities or alternative energy technology companies.Efficiency is more important than speed, as solar cars are effectively electric cars, constrained by battery technology. Batteries have 50 times less energy density than petrol.  A litre of petrol weighs a bit less than a kilogram, and that will take the average car about 10km. One kilogram of fully charged battery, however, will take a car of about the same weight no more than a couple of hundred metres. In order to race an electric car 4 000km, you need to regularly recharge the batteries, hence the solar panels. So the race is not judged on speed, but on distance covered.Each car is accompanied by a trailer and, if they run out of power, they can opt to get back on the trailer and get credit for the mileage they’ve done, or they can stop and wait for the batteries to recharge.The more experienced drivers plan their energy consumption in such a way that they never run out of power, by driving slower, planning their stops and understanding the energy losses in the total system. If the weather is particularly bad or the road conditions unsafe, the organisers can call for all vehicles to be trailered.All the vehicles, regardless of class, have to have effective brakes and regulation lights. But they aren’t actually roadworthy, so each car is sandwiched between two escort cars to protect them from careless fellow road users, and protect other road users from them.In a previous solar race elsewhere, one of the cars had brake failure, but – fortunately – only crumpled its nose against its escort vehicle. What would be more disastrous is for an 18-wheeler to drive over one. They’re hard to see – being close to the ground, streamlined and almost invisible as the top surface is covered in dark, reflective solar panels. The top of some cars wouldn’t even reach the wheel nuts of a big truck.Challenge, Adventure and TechnologyThe race has three categories: Challenge, Adventure and the rather anomalous but exciting Technology Class, or Green Fleet. This last is open to either production vehicles using alternative fuels, or one-off designs. But the first South African Solar Challenge had only one entry in this class – a hybrid motorcycle from Malaysia.Winstone Jordaan, the event organiser, said that he hoped that in the next event, scheduled for 2010, commercial vehicle manufacturers would use the race to showcase their alternative-fuel models. By then there should be many more alternatively powered cars on the road, so this class could become seriously competitive.The Challenge Class is the most demanding, as the cars need to be a bit more “normal”. They must have a sit-up seat, not a reclining one, and generally be something that most people could actually imagine driving. Of the two leading vehicles in the race, that belonging to Team Sunna and designed, built and driven by Divwatt was the only one to qualify for this class.The Japanese entry, designed by engineering students from Tokai University, is by far the fastest and most efficient car in the fleet. Competing in the Adventure Class, it was the overall winner and an inspiration to the other competitors.At 11 years old the vehicle is a solar-race veteran, and the Japanese team exude an air of professionalism that shows they have been doing this for some time. While most of the other drivers are students, alternative technology buffs or engineers, the Japanese team has a string of five professional race drivers – all capable of doing repairs on the vehicle – as well as a small battalion of engineers.The spirit of the raceWhile it is an actual race, the spirit of the event is not particularly competitive. There were only six teams and, by the time they had reached Cape Town, only two cars had managed to run under their own steam – or sunshine. Most were plagued by technical or logistical problems.The two Indian teams were struggling to get their cars through customs into the country in time. In the spirit of the event they were hoping to drive a leg or two, even if they had no chance of winning. Two of the three South African teams had technical problems they were hoping to sort out so that they could, at least, do some of the race.Hermann Oelsner, the owner of Silver Fox, relates how Georg Brasseur, the FIA technical representative, stayed up until early in the morning trying to help him sort out his technical hitch after his car blew up its controller at the start. A few sparks, a fizz and then a sinking feeling as, after an exhausting resuscitation attempt, the phrase dreaded by every car owner was said: “We need this one small part …” This particular part had to come from Germany.It hadn’t arrived by Wednesday 1 October and Oelsner decided to take his car back home to Darling, where he runs South Africa’s first privately owned wind farm, which supplies electricity to the City of Cape Town. Even though the vehicle had done no actual mileage, he said, he had learned a lot on the race and will come fully prepared in 2010 – probably with a huge box of spare parts in the support vehicle.Being the first time the event was run, all involved have used it as a learning experience – the organisers and the competitors.“It’s a huge learning curve,” Jordaan said. “We’ve had no sponsorship so we haven’t managed to do much in the way of publicity or marketing, but we’re hoping to rectify that in 2010.”The organisers had hoped for more international competitors, he said, but the top teams stayed away because there was little in the way of exposure or kudos. They’d had a few nibbles but, Jordaan thinks, perhaps the course put them off.Tough goingIt’s not only the longest solar-powered race in the world, it’s the toughest. It’s mostly downhill from Pretoria to Cape Town, but the Hex River Mountains outside Cape Town pose a challenging barrier, with some nasty climbs. Getting out of Cape Town via the coast means negotiating Sir Lowry’s Pass and Houwhoek Pass, both high, steep and twisted.There are a few bumps and grinds further along the coast, such as the notorious Kei Cuttings in the Eastern Cape.  And it’s all uphill from the coast back up to Gauteng.  So not having much to gain and everything to lose if the terrain proved too taxing, the really competitive teams stayed home.The event was held as a stage race, with all the teams leaving together and spending each night in the same place. The organisers therefore had to make a call to put the vehicles on the trailers if it looked like they were not going to make the daily target.Ideally the teams should have all set off and kept going, spending the night wherever they ended up at sunset. But the logistics of this were too complicated with the resources the inaugural race had at hand.An advantage of this was that all the cars were in one place, so locals could come and have a good look. There was a surprisingly good turnout at Canal Walk in Cape Town, with fascinated onlookers asking the team members all kinds of questions – a good advertisement for alternative energy.Once the race is more established, and there are more resources, it will be run as a straightforward race, with each team heading off on their own with the leaders quite possibly finishing days ahead of their competitors.By the afternoon of Friday 4 October the race was almost in East London, a coastal city in the Eastern Cape. With glorious sunshine to push them on, the Japanese team were ahead of the organisers, who were flirting with speed limits to catch up to them.“Oh well,” Jordaan said, “it won’t be a total disaster if they get there before me, but it would be a bit embarrassing.”It was later discovered that the Japanese team followed some incorrect road signs and went via Grahamstown instead of Port Alfred. This was a far more complex climb, with worse road conditions, but they completed it like champions.Sunday 5 October saw the shortest stage – 128km from Port Shepstone to the Gateway shopping mall north of Durban. Not a single sunbeam broke through the clouds and there was heavy rain for most of the distance, but the Tokai University team drove the whole way on battery power, averaging a speed of about 45km an hour – much less than they can do with sunshine. It was good to have one car, at least, drive up to Gateway and through the parking lot with its trailer following empty.The Indians got their vehicles through customs on Sunday and, after a long night of scrutiny, the Netaji Subhas Institute of Technology car was passed for racing. The other Indian team Delhi College of Engineering was held back because the wiring was a not up to standard, and might pose a danger in the case of an accident.So on Monday four cars headed off towards Ermelo and then, on Tuesday 7 October, continued to Pretoria. That was where the Japanese car – to nobody’s surprise – passed the finish line first and, more importantly, registered by far the longest mileage.Related articlesSappi and Volvo greening SA Electrifying SA’s motor industry A power plant in your home Wind power on SA’s national grid Motorwind-powered energy Rallying around cleaner energy Useful linksSouth African Solar Challenge Federation International de l’Automobile American Solar Challenge World Solar Challenge Divwatt Iritron The Innovation Hublast_img read more

first_img1-Timea Babos (Hun) bt 5-Chanel Simmonds (RSA) 6-7(3) 6-4 6-1 See-sawThe see-saw effect continued in the second until Simmonds secured a break in the fourth game to serve at 3-1. Babos soon broke back to draw level at 3-3, before surviving a mammoth 10th game. It lasted nearly 15 minutes, during which she saved eight break points, and more importantly grabbed the momentum heading into the deciding set. 13 May 2013 There was some consolation for Simmonds, who teamed up with Poland’s Magda Linette to win the doubles title, defeating the British pair of Jade Windley and Samantha Murray 6-1, 6-3 in the final. After giving the crowd so much hope early on, Simmonds wilted away in the deciding set, clearly frustrated at not being able to wrap up the match, with her opponent in rampant mood. “At the start of the second, I was just telling my coach that somehow I will manage to win, even if I have to hold my racket in my left hand, so I’m really happy to have won the title.” SAinfo reporter She was especially proud of her efforts during the quarter and semi-finals in which she defeated second-seed Julia Glushko of Israel and Ukrainian Nadiya Kichenok, the fourth-seed. The contest lasted just over three hours, with Babos eventually prevailing 6-7 (3-7) 6-4, 6-1. Simmonds, although disappointed at finishing runner-up, had plenty of positives to take away from the tournament. The powerful Babos – ranked 67 places higher than Simmonds – hardly had it her own way in a match that featured countless breaks of serve in blustery conditions. “I came here to get into the main draw of Wimbledon and being in the semi- finals, I had already done that, so I didn’t just want to stop there, so with this result I’ll be back in the top-100,” she said.center_img Doubles Final “I’m a little disappointed after today, but I’m just so glad to have reached the final of a 50 000 [dollar event], even though I lost,” she said. Making it to the final should see Simmonds climb at least 30 places up from her current position of 181st in the world rankings. The big-serving Hungarian needed only 20 minutes to finally put the South African’s hopes to bed en-route to her 10th ITF singles title. “When I won the game at 5-4, I thought okay, I’m back on track and can win this match, so I was trying to focus on the good things, win more points and finally win the match,” said the 20-year-old. Women’s Singles Final 1 – Chanel Simmonds (RSA/ Magda Linette (Pol) bt Jade Windley/ Samantha Murray (GBR) 6-1, 6-3 Winning the toss and electing to serve, Babos was the first to break and quickly raced to a 3-0 lead before serving for the first set at 5-3. Simmonds, plucky as always, fought back to level the match at 5-5 and despite allowing Babos back to force a tie-break, kept her nose in front throughout. “It was a really tough match and Chanel did a really great job. She made me more and more uncomfortable throughout the first set and at the beginning of the second, so I really had to fight back,” said the world number 114. South Africa’s Chanel Simmonds narrowly missed out on winning the Soweto Open, going down to top-seed Timea Babos in three sets in the final, played at the Arthur Ashe Tennis Centre on Saturday. Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

first_imgThe regional office of the Uttar Pradesh Pollution Control Board has recommended ₹90,23,437.50 in fine on the National Highways Authority of India for violating the rules for dust abatement on construction sites. UPPCB Regional Officer Utsav Sharma told The Hindu that the NHAI had not adopted the dust abatement measures notified by the Ministry of Environment, Forests and Climate Change. “The fine has been calculated on the basis of the guidelines issued by the Central Pollution Control Board for penalising defaulters,” he said. The NHAI, which was penalised last year too, is into expansion of National Highway-9 in Ghaziabad in Gautam Buddh Nagar, and Hapur. “Our teams have been maintaining vigil to identify sources contributing to Particulate Matter 10 and Particulate Matter 2.5 in the region,” Mr. Sharma said. Mr. Sharma said the present Air Quality Index of the region was in the poor category, and with unfavourable weather conditions forecast, things were not expected to improve in the near future. The UPPCB has asked that under-construction materials, handled on-site, be covered and dust-breaking screens be erected wherever necessary. “None of these measures is being adopted on the project site,” he said. It also recommended a fine of ₹50 lakh on two factories in Ghaziabad district for burning plastic in boilers.last_img read more

first_imgPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hosting UST, which had its three-game winning streak snapped, dropped to a 5-3 record for the fourth spot.Like two heavy-handed sluggers in the 12th, Ateneo and UST continued to trade blows well into the latter stages of the fifth set.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSPalace wants Cayetano’s PHISGOC Foundation probed over corruption chargesSPORTSSingapore latest to raise issue on SEA Games food, logisticsThe two teams exchanged leads several times until Ateneo took advantage of Eya Laure’s service error at the 10-10 score line and took it up a notch for the 13-10 advantage after Kat Tolentino’s ace.Cherry Rondina salvaged a point for UST, 13-11, but it was her own doing that doomed UST when her final attempt hit the antenna giving Ateneo the victory. Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. LATEST STORIES Eya Laure was UST’s second fiddle with 21 points.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next SEA Games hosting troubles anger Duterte “UST really came prepared that’s all I can say but my players really fought well and the resiliency was there,” said Ateneo head coach Oliver Almadro. “I really admire the players because of the trust they gave me and I just told them to never give up and just be patient and have fun.”“I really give this game to UST also, it just so happens that the breaks of the game went into our favor.”The game didn’t just see streaks get extended and broken, it also saw a couple of historic performance from Ateneo’s Maddie Madayag and UST’s Rondina.Maadayag’s 11 blocks that broke the record for most blocks in a game in the Final Four era while Rondina’s 35 points became the single-game scoring record for a Golden Tigress also in the Final Four era.Madayag would finish with 23 points to lead Ateneo while Kat Tolentino added 20.ADVERTISEMENT Wintry storm delivers US travel woes before Thanksgiving Google Philippines names new country director MOST READcenter_img Trump tells impeachment jokes at annual turkey pardon event PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games PLAY LIST 02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games02:11Trump awards medals to Jon Voight, Alison Krauss FILE – Ateneo Lady Eagles. Photo by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netMANILA, Philippines—Ateneo kept the streak alive as it survived University of Santo Tomas in a thriller, 19-25, 22-25, 27-25, 25-22, 15-11, in the UAAP Season 81 women’s volleyball tournament Wednesday at Filoil Flying V Center.Not only did the Lady Eagles improve to 7-1 after their seventh straight win, they also extended their dominance over the Golden Tigresses to 15 games dating back to Season 74.ADVERTISEMENT Colombia protesters vow new strike after talks hit snag View comments Miguel Romero Polo: Bamboo technology like no other Bloomberg: US would benefit from more, not fewer, immigrants Jalen Green posterizes 7-foot-2 Kai Sotto againlast_img read more