first_imgBRIDGETOWN, Barbados, (CMC): Back-to-back defeats to England last weekend have left West Indies facing a second straight series whitewash, a fate they will earnestly attempt to avoid when they contest the final One-Day International at Kensington Oval here today. The Caribbean side slumped to a 45-run loss in the opening game at the Vivian Richards Cricket Stadium last Thursday and two days later, lost by four wickets in the second encounter at the same venue. But even though the three-match series has already been decided, captain Jason Holder urged his side to stay focused on securing a victory especially with West Indies urgently needing to bolster their ranking in order to earn automatic qualification for the 2019 Cricket World Cup. “A win here obviously would be very valuable. Pakistan is ahead of us [in the one-day rankings] as well so we just need to pick up points there,” Holder told reporters here Wednesday. “We haven’t worked it out mathematically but we know the importance of every game especially playing a side that is higher ranked than us. We’ve got England now, Pakistan afterward, then we have India later down in the year and then we also have one-dayers in England. “Those are all teams that are ranked higher than us. “The magnitude of the situation is for us to win these games against higher ranked sides, and I think once we do that, we’ll definitely qualify for the World Cup.” In both previous games, West Indies found themselves with chances to turn the results their way, but lacked the killer instinct. Chasing 297 in the opener, they were 190 for four in the 39th over but threw away their last six wickets for 61 runs, to surrender meekly. Then, in last Sunday’s encounter, England plunged to 124 for six at the half-way stage in pursuit of 226 but West Indies proved sloppy in the field, and Joe Root (90 not out) and Chris Woakes (68 not out) capitalised, engineering an unbroken stand of 102 for the seventh wicket to frustrate the hosts. Holder said despite the two disappointing performances, the Windies had remained upbeat and were optimistic about turning their fortunes around. “We’ve also let ourselves down in the field in terms of dropping catches and being a bit sloppy in the field so that’s obviously an area we have paid some attention to, and I think once we hold those half chances, games can be a lot different for us.” Last October, West Indies were swept by Pakistan in a similar three-match series in United Arab Emirates. The following month, they struggled in Zimbabwe during the Tri-Nations Series involving the hosts and Sri Lanka, missing out on the final after winning just one of four games. Killer instinctlast_img read more

first_imgLIPO Director General, Roosevelt Gould Kicks off development of National IP PlanThe Liberia Industrial Property Office (LIPO) has begun a 12-day stakeholders’ field trip intended to develop a national intellectual property strategic plan to be integrated into the government’s national development agenda.The field trip comes at a time when investors, inventors and artists in the creative sector (film, music, innovation, etc ), are taking steps to ensure that government pays more attention to this lucrative creative industry.Since the country enacted the Intellectual Property Law, no government – past or present, has fully given recognition to the creative sector as an engine of growth due to what they describe as ‘lack of a road map for the sector.’Accordingly, the 12-day LIPO field trip is expected to change things as part of its trajectory will be the development of a national strategic intellectual property (IP) plan that will encourage and facilitate useful creations, critical developments and management and protection of IP at the national level, as well as giving more subsidies to creative industry societies.LIPO director general Roosevelt Gould, who took over the agency less than five months ago,  initiated this crucial activity that will soon see artists benefiting more from their career paths.  Artists have described the plan that is being developed as “a crosscutting document which outlines links with diverse policy areas to ensure effective coordination with other activities.”He added that a national IP strategy strengthens a country’s ability to generate economic growth, both in terms of GDP and human capital.“With the coming of this strategy, everything ranging from literary to artistic works and genetic and biological assets will be protected and the individuals behind them will fully reap their benefits. Without a national IP strategy, it is difficult to unlock these assets in a planned, efficient, and sustainable manner.“The goal of this national IP strategy is the creation, ownership, and management of artists and inventors’ rights to increase economic growth. The world is now being controlled by IP, and if other countries are benefiting from this, it is about time Liberia starts to benefit as well.“We have artists and inventors who are supposed to be millionaires by now, but this is not happening because we lack a national IP strategy. We have a good IP law but in the absence of a national IP strategy – which is a key policy tool to promote public interest in the arts and innovation and for the environment to thrive, then the law remains inactive,” he said.Gould noted that since 2009, LIPO has been undergoing numerous reforms and working hard to make sure that its performance equals and surpasses its mandate.Director Gould added that the 12-day field trip will be managed by two expert consultants sent by the World Intellectual Property Organization to work alongside the agency’s staff to develop the country’s strategic IP plan through stakeholder engagement.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more