first_imgBBC News posted an article updating the story of Homo florensiensis, the so-called “Hobbit Man” miniature-human fossil (see 10/27/2004).  Opponents of the “missing link” interpretation are becoming more ardent in their claim that the fossils represent diseased modern humans with a condition known as microcephaly.  The discoverers are not convinced.Wait for this story to play out before jumping to conclusions.  If like most early man claims, it will be debunked in time.  Never be swayed by initial claims.  Wait for “the rest of the story.”(Visited 9 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

first_imgThe winning car in the South African SolarChallenge, put together by a team fromTokai University, Japan, heading towardsthe Hex River mountains outside CapeTown.(Image: Zellous Racing) Each car in the race was sandwichedbetween two support cars to protect thesmall and fragile vehicles from other roadusers.(Image: Shane Barrett) The race covered 4 175km of tough SouthAfrican territory.(Image: South African Solar Challenge)Jennifer SternOn Tuesday 7 October a fleet of odd-looking vehicles rolled into Pretoria after an epic two-week, 4 175km round-trip across South Africa’s heartland and back along its coastline. This was the end of the inaugural South African Solar Challenge, the longest and toughest solar-powered race in the world, and the first sanctioned by the Federation International de l’Automobile (International Automobile Federation, or FIA).Setting off from Pretoria in Gauteng province on 28 September, the race covered the 530km to Kimberley in the Northern Cape by that evening. The next day they headed to Beaufort West, and the next to the coastal city of Cape Town, where the cars were on display in Canal Walk shopping centre on 1 October.The route back to Pretoria took the long way, east along South Africa’s coastline via Plettenberg Bay, East London, Port Shepstone, Durban and Ermelo.The South African Solar Challenge is similar to those run in the US and Australia for years, but with the distinction that it is sanctioned by FIA, the body that administers all motor sport including Formula 1 racing.The Australian and US races predate FIA’s interest in alternative-fuel racing, so they have their systems well established. Because the South African Solar Challenge is a brand new event, FIA was on board from the beginning. It’s probably only a matter of time until the other big solar races fall into line with FIA requirements, or the association alters its requirements to accommodate the established races.Energy efficiencyWhile the race is probably the most exciting, and certainly the most visually interesting, part of the event, it is in fact a small aspect of it. What it’s really all about is designing and building the cars. These are not production vehicles – every one is designed and built by the team that races it, and most teams are attached to universities or alternative energy technology companies.Efficiency is more important than speed, as solar cars are effectively electric cars, constrained by battery technology. Batteries have 50 times less energy density than petrol.  A litre of petrol weighs a bit less than a kilogram, and that will take the average car about 10km. One kilogram of fully charged battery, however, will take a car of about the same weight no more than a couple of hundred metres. In order to race an electric car 4 000km, you need to regularly recharge the batteries, hence the solar panels. So the race is not judged on speed, but on distance covered.Each car is accompanied by a trailer and, if they run out of power, they can opt to get back on the trailer and get credit for the mileage they’ve done, or they can stop and wait for the batteries to recharge.The more experienced drivers plan their energy consumption in such a way that they never run out of power, by driving slower, planning their stops and understanding the energy losses in the total system. If the weather is particularly bad or the road conditions unsafe, the organisers can call for all vehicles to be trailered.All the vehicles, regardless of class, have to have effective brakes and regulation lights. But they aren’t actually roadworthy, so each car is sandwiched between two escort cars to protect them from careless fellow road users, and protect other road users from them.In a previous solar race elsewhere, one of the cars had brake failure, but – fortunately – only crumpled its nose against its escort vehicle. What would be more disastrous is for an 18-wheeler to drive over one. They’re hard to see – being close to the ground, streamlined and almost invisible as the top surface is covered in dark, reflective solar panels. The top of some cars wouldn’t even reach the wheel nuts of a big truck.Challenge, Adventure and TechnologyThe race has three categories: Challenge, Adventure and the rather anomalous but exciting Technology Class, or Green Fleet. This last is open to either production vehicles using alternative fuels, or one-off designs. But the first South African Solar Challenge had only one entry in this class – a hybrid motorcycle from Malaysia.Winstone Jordaan, the event organiser, said that he hoped that in the next event, scheduled for 2010, commercial vehicle manufacturers would use the race to showcase their alternative-fuel models. By then there should be many more alternatively powered cars on the road, so this class could become seriously competitive.The Challenge Class is the most demanding, as the cars need to be a bit more “normal”. They must have a sit-up seat, not a reclining one, and generally be something that most people could actually imagine driving. Of the two leading vehicles in the race, that belonging to Team Sunna and designed, built and driven by Divwatt was the only one to qualify for this class.The Japanese entry, designed by engineering students from Tokai University, is by far the fastest and most efficient car in the fleet. Competing in the Adventure Class, it was the overall winner and an inspiration to the other competitors.At 11 years old the vehicle is a solar-race veteran, and the Japanese team exude an air of professionalism that shows they have been doing this for some time. While most of the other drivers are students, alternative technology buffs or engineers, the Japanese team has a string of five professional race drivers – all capable of doing repairs on the vehicle – as well as a small battalion of engineers.The spirit of the raceWhile it is an actual race, the spirit of the event is not particularly competitive. There were only six teams and, by the time they had reached Cape Town, only two cars had managed to run under their own steam – or sunshine. Most were plagued by technical or logistical problems.The two Indian teams were struggling to get their cars through customs into the country in time. In the spirit of the event they were hoping to drive a leg or two, even if they had no chance of winning. Two of the three South African teams had technical problems they were hoping to sort out so that they could, at least, do some of the race.Hermann Oelsner, the owner of Silver Fox, relates how Georg Brasseur, the FIA technical representative, stayed up until early in the morning trying to help him sort out his technical hitch after his car blew up its controller at the start. A few sparks, a fizz and then a sinking feeling as, after an exhausting resuscitation attempt, the phrase dreaded by every car owner was said: “We need this one small part …” This particular part had to come from Germany.It hadn’t arrived by Wednesday 1 October and Oelsner decided to take his car back home to Darling, where he runs South Africa’s first privately owned wind farm, which supplies electricity to the City of Cape Town. Even though the vehicle had done no actual mileage, he said, he had learned a lot on the race and will come fully prepared in 2010 – probably with a huge box of spare parts in the support vehicle.Being the first time the event was run, all involved have used it as a learning experience – the organisers and the competitors.“It’s a huge learning curve,” Jordaan said. “We’ve had no sponsorship so we haven’t managed to do much in the way of publicity or marketing, but we’re hoping to rectify that in 2010.”The organisers had hoped for more international competitors, he said, but the top teams stayed away because there was little in the way of exposure or kudos. They’d had a few nibbles but, Jordaan thinks, perhaps the course put them off.Tough goingIt’s not only the longest solar-powered race in the world, it’s the toughest. It’s mostly downhill from Pretoria to Cape Town, but the Hex River Mountains outside Cape Town pose a challenging barrier, with some nasty climbs. Getting out of Cape Town via the coast means negotiating Sir Lowry’s Pass and Houwhoek Pass, both high, steep and twisted.There are a few bumps and grinds further along the coast, such as the notorious Kei Cuttings in the Eastern Cape.  And it’s all uphill from the coast back up to Gauteng.  So not having much to gain and everything to lose if the terrain proved too taxing, the really competitive teams stayed home.The event was held as a stage race, with all the teams leaving together and spending each night in the same place. The organisers therefore had to make a call to put the vehicles on the trailers if it looked like they were not going to make the daily target.Ideally the teams should have all set off and kept going, spending the night wherever they ended up at sunset. But the logistics of this were too complicated with the resources the inaugural race had at hand.An advantage of this was that all the cars were in one place, so locals could come and have a good look. There was a surprisingly good turnout at Canal Walk in Cape Town, with fascinated onlookers asking the team members all kinds of questions – a good advertisement for alternative energy.Once the race is more established, and there are more resources, it will be run as a straightforward race, with each team heading off on their own with the leaders quite possibly finishing days ahead of their competitors.By the afternoon of Friday 4 October the race was almost in East London, a coastal city in the Eastern Cape. With glorious sunshine to push them on, the Japanese team were ahead of the organisers, who were flirting with speed limits to catch up to them.“Oh well,” Jordaan said, “it won’t be a total disaster if they get there before me, but it would be a bit embarrassing.”It was later discovered that the Japanese team followed some incorrect road signs and went via Grahamstown instead of Port Alfred. This was a far more complex climb, with worse road conditions, but they completed it like champions.Sunday 5 October saw the shortest stage – 128km from Port Shepstone to the Gateway shopping mall north of Durban. Not a single sunbeam broke through the clouds and there was heavy rain for most of the distance, but the Tokai University team drove the whole way on battery power, averaging a speed of about 45km an hour – much less than they can do with sunshine. It was good to have one car, at least, drive up to Gateway and through the parking lot with its trailer following empty.The Indians got their vehicles through customs on Sunday and, after a long night of scrutiny, the Netaji Subhas Institute of Technology car was passed for racing. The other Indian team Delhi College of Engineering was held back because the wiring was a not up to standard, and might pose a danger in the case of an accident.So on Monday four cars headed off towards Ermelo and then, on Tuesday 7 October, continued to Pretoria. That was where the Japanese car – to nobody’s surprise – passed the finish line first and, more importantly, registered by far the longest mileage.Related articlesSappi and Volvo greening SA Electrifying SA’s motor industry A power plant in your home Wind power on SA’s national grid Motorwind-powered energy Rallying around cleaner energy Useful linksSouth African Solar Challenge Federation International de l’Automobile American Solar Challenge World Solar Challenge Divwatt Iritron The Innovation Hublast_img read more

first_imgThe Victoria Falls – “the smoke thatthunders” – on the Zambezi River, on theborder of Zimbabwe and Zambia. The flag of Zimbabwe, showing thecountry’s ubiquitous bird motif.(Images: Wikipedia) RELATED ARTICLES• Return to Zimbabwe• A holiday – in Zimbabwe?• To Zim, with love, Jenny• Zim schooling gets $70m boost• The Tour de Kruger – a wild rideMEDIA CONTACTS• Zimbabwe Tourism+263 4 752570 / 758730-34info@ztazim.co.zwChris ThurmanAs we passed through the entrance to the Victoria Falls, it was there to greet us again: the ubiquitous, mysterious bird that appears on Zimbabwe’s national flag and coat of arms, as well as in countless sculptures and statuettes across the country.There was some disagreement among our group as to the bird’s provenance. Two Zimbabweans were at loggerheads. One insisted that it was a purely mythical creature, based on soapstone renderings found at the ruins of the Dzimba dza mabwe, or Great Zimbabwe. The other felt that it depicted a real bird species – but couldn’t remember which one. So the South Africans offered some (admittedly unhelpful) suggestions: a fisheagle? A francolin? A griffin-like composite of different species?Conversation was abruptly ended by our first, breathtaking view of the falls. It was towards the end of a rainy summer, with the mighty Zambezi River at its fullest and most powerful and the sheer volume of water producing the famous “smoke that thunders”, such a thick mist that the lower half of the dizzying 100-metre drop was obscured.Purists prefer the dry winter months, when the sense of vertigo is greater, but during a summer visit you not only see and hear the falls, you feel them too. It’s a curious but invigorating sensation – standing in the rain under a clear blue sky. And the rainbows are spectacular.We forgot all about the puzzle of Zimbabwe’s avian emblem as we admired the vistas across the world’s biggest waterfall. In the days that followed, our minds were occupied by other concerns. A three-iron or a driver off the first tee at the Elephant Hills golf course? A vertical bungee jump off the bridge that connects Zimbabwe and Zambia, or an equally terrifying gorge-swing? A helicopter flip or a walk with lions?And, the most difficult decision of all, which is the superior local beer – Zambezi or Bohlingers?But let’s not be too trivial: there are serious questions to address when it comes to travelling in Zimbabwe. The ethics of tourism in a country with such profound social, political and economic problems have been a worry to potential visitors. Is it right to stay in luxury accommodation and enjoy the delights on offer at Vic Falls when millions of Zimbabweans are starving and oppressed?Even before the 2009 formation of the unity government, however, locals gave an unequivocal response: yes. Tourist revenue, limited though it was – especially as more and more travellers preferred to see the Falls from the Zambian side – provided a lifeline for many Zimbabweans during the worst years. Thousands are employed in the service industry at Vic Falls, with families in Harare, Bulawayo and elsewhere dependent on their income. And despite government tariffs and “unofficial” charges, the portion of each tourist dollar that went to President Robert Mugabe’s coffers was comparatively small.A measure of stability has been achieved since “unity”, although petty rivalries and megalomaniacal egos continue to obfuscate rather than facilitate the rebuilding of the country. At least new appointees from both the Zanu-PF and Movement for Democratic Change political parties seem more sympathetic to the difficulties faced by businesspeople at Vic Falls – partly because, in a dollarised economy, the foreign currency generated by tourism is vital. But at the same time, a new problem has arisen: the global recession, and with it a slump in the number of people in the US, Europe and Asia who can afford to travel.Still, they’re a resolute bunch at Vic Falls. They managed to find fuel and food, mostly from frequent trips to neighbouring Zambia and Botswana, when the Zimbabwe crisis was at its worst. In the 2008 and 2009 cholera outbreak they managed to keep the disease at bay.And now they’re looking to make the Victoria Falls a regional hub for both southern African and international travellers. The map doesn’t lie: the national parks of Chobe (Botswana) and Hwange (Zimbabwe) are within a two-hour drive from the falls. It’s quicker to fly from Johannesburg to Victoria Falls than it is to Cape Town. And, with airport upgrades in the offing and the possibility of airlines like Qatar and Emirates – and perhaps even some of the cheaper South African carriers – establishing routes to Vic Falls, the prospects are good.The ambitious Santonga Bio-Park project, a combination of wildlife and educational theme park, is due to open in 2010. The popular Victoria Falls Marathon and the Zambezi Rafting Challenge returned in August 2009. If this all sounds a little exhausting, fear not; Vic Falls remains a decidedly laid-back corner of the world. There’s plenty to keep adrenalin junkies busy, but equally popular activities are sundowners on the patio of the venerable Victoria Falls Hotel or lazy sunset river cruises.Indeed, it was while drifting on the Zambezi on the final evening of our visit that we solved the mystery of Zimbabwe’s emblem. The bird is, someone suggested – and despite the ongoing social, political and economic problems by which the country is beset, at that moment it was hard to disagree – a phoenix rising from the ashes. Chris Thurman was hosted by African Sun Limited, Shearwater Adventures and the www.gotovictoriafalls.com campaign.last_img read more

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest The small business sector in Ohio is vital to many stakeholders. The Center for Innovative Food Technology (CIFT) and the Ohio Farm Bureau Federation sponsored the Ohio Signature Food Contest which showcases many new, innovative products ready to take that next step — actual product development.CIFT President & CEO, Rebecca Singer announced the winners selected in recognition of their product concepts: Sarah Steinbrunner and Taylor Crooks of Sandusky, Ohio with their Bean Nut Butter: A delicious non-GMO and vegan nut butter that is free of the top eight allergens. Uniquely incorporates garbanzo beans which are high in protein and fiber, but lack high calorie and fat content association with regular nuts. Tina Smith and Nate Bissell of Jefferson, Ohio with their Sweet and Spicy Maple BBQ Sauce: A unique, all-natural barbecue sauce made with a kick of hot peppers but offering a special ingredient – the sweetness of pure Ohio maple syrup. Following a review of written applications and presentations by food entrepreneurs and chefs to a panel of judges, the highest scoring concepts were selected based on the viability of the product, commercialization potential, business strategy, and overall appeal to the marketplace.As a result of the award, technical assistance from CIFT will be provided to the startup businesses ranging from business planning, product/process development, shelf stability testing, labeling review, regulatory assistance, and batch product preparations for sampling. Later, production will take place at the Northwest Ohio Cooperative Kitchen (NOCK) in Bowling Green, Ohio. The NOCK is a commercially-licensed kitchen that educates and provides technical assistance to new and growing food businesses.last_img read more

first_img SharePrint Related11 stunning EarthCaches and how to find themJune 17, 2015In “Geocaching Info”Discover EarthCaching and 11 Stunning LocationsAugust 5, 2014In “Community”7 Continents, 7 EarthCachesOctober 3, 2017In “Community” Is this really Earth? Photo: “Grand prismatic spring” by Jim Peaco, National Park ServiceGeocache Name:Rainbow’s End: Grand Prismatic Spring (GC1JY47)Difficulty/Terrain Rating:2/1Why this is the Geocache of the Week:If you’re still searching for an EarthCache to find in order to earn your Nature Lover souvenir for the Seven Souvenirs of August, consider visiting a place that doesn’t even look like it belongs on Earth. EarthCaches bring geocachers to geologic formations and require them to answer questions about that formation in order to make the find. The Grand Prismatic Spring (or as the CO of this EarthCache points out: “GPS” for short) is the largest hot spring in the United States and third-largest in the world. However, what really draws the crowds are the amazing colors throughout the formation, caused by bacteria and mineral-rich water.What the geocache owner, Frumious Jane, has to say:“The Grand Prismatic Spring is my favorite place on the planet.  The longer I sit there on the boardwalk, the further away my troubles seem. We get so used to seeing streets, houses, power lines, and cars in our daily lives that these things become our Normal. Geocaching offers us caching options in pretty much every environment on the planet, and I’m a big sucker for the strange and glorious spots. I love being reminded that I live on a planet filled with rare and beautiful geologic features. The Grand Prismatic Spring offers a fascinating variant on the deadly beauty of volcanoes: the magma is underground, but we can see its effects on the steaming groundwater in the beautiful pools that dot Yellowstone National Park. Walking right up to something as resplendent as the Grand Prismatic Spring, knowing I’m standing atop a subterranean volcano all the while, gave me such a thrill that all I wanted to do was share it. We civilized folks just don’t get to experience surreal moments very often, and I wanted to let others know there was something worth pulling off the road for, something amazing to experience and think about. I’ve been a geocacher for over nine years, and I’ve made tons of fun and exciting memories with friends and strangers who hunt for Tupperware in the woods with me. Geocaching can bring out the best and most generous in us, and my life has been changed for the better by all those I’ve met and cached with over the years. I’ve raised my kids to enjoy the hunt and to follow the arrow toward adventure. I’ve had so much fun geocaching that I was inspired to write novels in a second genre: mystery. Under my pen name Morgan C. Talbot, I’ve written the world’s only geocaching mystery series, combining my love of stories with my favorite hobby. The Caching Out series was picked up for publication two years ago, and I’ve gotten the same exceptional, positive feedback for my books as I have for my EarthCaches. My writing career has continued to grow and gain its own souvenirs, and I have the inspiration of the geocaching community to thank for their early encouragement. No matter how far I roam in this world, geocaching will always be close to my heart, and loaded into my Garmin.”What geocachers are saying:“What an amazing view from the road with all the colored mist rising! Spent a good two hours here. Such vivid color!” – Mommabre“The Grand Prismatic Spring is truly one of the most amazing things in the natural world. When we planned our trip to Yellowstone this was one of the things I knew we definitely had to show the kids, and it was an absolutely perfect day to see it.” – bergmannfamily“Grand Prismatic has always been one of my favorite stops in Yellowstone — the colors are always fantastic. Thanks for giving us a reason to come out to visit again.” – NepoKamaPhotos:An overhead view of this amazing place. Photo by geocacher AUBURN SONRAYGeocacher Bangers&Mash enthusiastically makes the find.The end of the rainbow. Photo by geocacher Eispiraten DD. Every time I read a new log telling me how awestruck the cachers were when they looked out over the spring for the first time, or how they’d never have pulled into the parking lot except for the EarthCache symbol on the map, I get all warm and fuzzy. Our lives are collections of experiences great and small. I’m both thrilled and humbled that so many people who share my hobby have also shared my enjoyment of this place I adore so much, taking home from their travels a little piece of joy and fun, and maybe a little snippet of knowledge, too.center_img What incredible natural formations have you seen while EarthCaching? Tell us or post photos in the comments. Continue to explore some of the most engaging geocaches around the globe. Check out all the Geocaches of the Week on the Geocaching blog.If you would like to nominate a Geocache of the Week, just fill out this form. Thanks!Share with your Friends:Morelast_img read more

first_imgBy Jay Morse & Heidi Radunovich, PhDUniversity of Kentucky [Military Family Programs, 2015 Kentucky Military Family Camps]Wilderness and adventure therapy programs are typically used with adolescents dealing with a range of mental health problems as well as behavioral issues.  Faculty from the University of Kentucky, partnered with Perdue University, adapted an existing curriculum (Blue to You; altered and titled Campfire Curriculum) for use with military families, and used existing wilderness and adventure therapy models to design a program aimed at helping teenage children and their service member parents reconnect.In wilderness and adventure therapy programs, action-oriented activities are used to elicit emotion and provide immediate feedback.   Programming is specifically designed to encourage self-disclosure.  In this  camp model, family activities were developed to reconnect military parents and their teenage children through team-building exercises, cooperative problem-solving, utilization of creative coping strategies, communication, and teamwork.  Activity facilitators used were from outside the military and held at least a Bachelor’s level degree in areas related to outdoor and experiential education.  Mental health professionals with a marriage and family therapy background facilitated group discussions each evening at the end of the day’s activities.A total of 25 military parents and 3 spouses of military parents participated in the study.  Ages of parents ranged from 34 to 52 years, and they were predominately married males.  The total time in service ranged from 2.5 years to 26.0 years.  The total time deployed ranged from 0 to 96 months.Surveys were distributed on the last day of the camp and included 3 open-ended questions/statements related to skills and knowledge gained during the camp experience, and potential application of the camp experience at home.  Conventional content analysis techniques were used to analyze the surveys. In the analysis, 4 topics became apparent: (1) The role of communication; (2) Quality time together; (3) Working as a team; and, (4) Parenting.Over 80% of the participants noted that their communication had improved.  Participants noted that the time gathered as a group provided members an opportunity to share ideas on how to communicate with family members.  Participants also commented that by removing themselves from an environment with daily responsibilities, they were able to spend more time developing these important relationships.  Less prevalent themes emerged around team building and how the family functioned better working as a team, as well as how to work with their teenagers.  Some participants commented on how they learned about sharing feelings with their children rather than giving orders.  Experiencing the difference between family relationships and military command relationships is apparent when the themes of teams and parenting are considered in the context of military families, and has implications for clinical practice. Military members are accustomed to a role of leadership in combat – a situation that requires clear objectives, roles and responsibilities.  Teenage children, as they evolve into adults may appreciate a more collaborative role or a role of shared responsibilities as they develop.  In practice, it is important to consider the service member’s leadership style in the family, whether working with families that are reintegrating following deployment or not. Furthermore, the curriculum utilized in this study appears to have had a positive impact on family communication and bonding, and wilderness adventure camps may serve as a helpful adjunct to reintegration efforts.References[1] Ashurst, K., Smith, L., Little, C., Frey, L., Werner-Wilson, T., Stephenson, L., & Werner-Wilson, R. (2014). Perceived outcomes of military-extension adventure camps for military personnel and their teenage children. American Journal of Family Therapy, 42(2), 175-189. doi:10.1080/01926187.2013.799975This post was written by Jay Morse & Heidi Radunovich, PhD, members of the MFLN Family Development (FD) team which aims to support the development of professionals working with military families. Find out more about the Military Families Learning Network FD concentration on our website, on Facebook, on Twitter, YouTube, and on LinkedIn.last_img read more

first_imgJeff Horn. INQUIRER PHOTO/ROY LUARCABRISBANE, Australia—If trainer Glenn Rushton’s grand description of  Jeff Horn turns out to be true, then Manny Pacquiao is in for a brutal tussle on July 2.A punishing 10-week training camp, according to Rushton, has turned Horn into a fighting machine. Somebody with “hands like steel, body like granite,” and with “the strength of an ox.”ADVERTISEMENT With both Pacquiao and Horn wielding a heavy hand, said there’s a good chance of a stoppage late in the fight.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Rushton said he’s hoping that Pacquiao will bring his A-game into the “Battle of Brisbane” at the 52,500-seat Suncorp Stadium because Horn will definitely be at his best form ever.After studying hundreds of tapes of Pacquiao’s previous fights, especially against the likes of Ricky Hatton, Oscar dela Hoya and Juan Manuel Marquez, Rushton has meticulously crafted a secret 10-point plan against Pacquiao.Rushton said if Horn will be able to follow the plan to the letter, and be on his toes every second of the 12-round bout, the former school teacher will be able to hurdle Pacquiao and shock the world.Rushton liked Pacquiao-Horn to a collision between an unstoppable force (Pacquiao) and an immovable object (Horn).And with Horn in terrific shape, Horn promises a much better fight than Pacquiao versus Jessie Vargas, Pacquiao against Timothy Bradley and Pacquiao against Juan Manuel Marquez.ADVERTISEMENT Cayetano to unmask people behind ‘smear campaign’ vs him, SEA Games LATEST STORIES Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss PLAY LIST 02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games Horn to take leaf out of Marquez book vs Pacquiao WATCH: Firefighters rescue baby seal found in parking garage Heart Evangelista admits she’s pregnant… with chicken MOST READcenter_img What ‘missteps’? Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Rushton, a self-made millionaire and mixed martial arts expert, also said during Horn’s media workout at the gym inside his mansion, that he hasn’t seen anybody really hurt Horn in the ring.Not even during his amateur days where Horn represented Australia in both the World Championships and the 2012 Olympics.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutAnd not in the pro ranks, where Horn holds a 16-0-1 record with 11 knockouts.In addition, Rushton swears that Horn has the will and the heart to give trouble to anybody, including Pacquiao. Ethel Booba on hotel’s clarification that ‘kikiam’ is ‘chicken sausage’: ‘Kung di pa pansinin, baka isipin nila ok lang’ 1 dead in Cavite blast, fire World’s 50 Best Restaurants launches new drinking and dining guide Lacson: SEA Games fund put in foundation like ‘Napoles case’ View commentslast_img read more

first_imgThe Axis Bank board has approved CEO Shikha Sharma’s request to re-appoint her for a six month period from June 1 to December 31.ReutersAxis Bank, India’s third-largest private-sector lender, said it has accepted Chief Executive Officer Shikha Sharma’s request to step down by December 31, more than two years before her term ends.The lender’s board had decided to re-appoint Sharma for a period of 3 years effective June 1, however, she requested to revise her term from June 1 up to December 31, the bank said in a statement on Monday.The board has accepted her request and it is subject to approval from the Reserve Bank of India (RBI). The private-sector lender did not state the reason behind Sharma’s early departure.So what exactly drove her to make this decision?The decision to reconsider her term rose after the RBI declined to sign off on the board’s proposal as it was unhappy with a surge in bad loans and some systemic lapses in the bank under her watch, the Economic Times had reported April 2, citing people familiar with the development, who didn’t wish to be identified.Axis Bank did not immediately respond to a request seeking comment.The RBI is delaying year-end bonuses to the heads of the top private banks citing the lenders’ performance issues, Bloomberg reported last week.Axis Bank’s board had approved a bonus of Rs 13.5 million for Shikha Sharma, the report said citing people familiar with the matter.The lender has seen a jump in bad loans by more than 300 percent in the past three years. The bank reported gross bad loans worth Rs 25,001 crore at the end of December 2017 compared to Rs 20,466 crore at the end of December 2016.On Monday, Axis Bank shares closed 3.8 percent higher on the Bombay Stock Exchange before the news.last_img read more