first_img Starting XV:15.Rob Miller14.Mark Cueto13.Johnny Leota12.Sam Tuitupou (C)11. Joaquin Tuculet10.Nick Macleod9.Dwayne Peel1.Alasdair Dickinson2.Marc Jones3.Henry Thomas4.Fraser McKenzie5.Kearnan Myall6.James Gaskell7.David Seymour8.Andy PowellReplacements:16.Tommy Taylor17.Vadim Cobilas18.Tony Buckley19.Richie Vernon20.Onosa’i Auva’a21.Cillian Willis22.Tasesa Lavea23.Luther Burrell STOCKPORT, ENGLAND – OCTOBER 08: Sam Tuitupou of Sale Sharks in action during the AVIVA Premiership match between Sale Sharks and Gloucester at Edgeley Park on October 8, 2011 in Stockport, England. (Photo by Matthew Lewis/Getty Images) LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img Sam Tuitupou will captain the side against the ChiefsSale Sharks welcome back Dwayne Peel and Joaquin Tuculet for tomorrow’s Aviva Premiership Round 9 game against Exeter Chiefs at Edgeley Park, kick off 7.45 p.m.Also included in the matchday squad is former Auckland Blues flanker Onosa’i Auva’a,  who is set for his Sharks’ debut if he comes off the bench.Sharks’ Executive Director of Sport Steve Diamond said, “In terms of our development, this match is the most pivotal game of the season. Exeter are a good side.  They are very workmanlike, keep the ball well and they wait for you to make a mistake. If we can achieve parity at our lineout and scrum, we can get some joy out of the game.”last_img read more

first_imgGOLD COAST, AUSTRALIA – NOVEMBER 26: Wales pose for a team photo after winning the Plate final between Wales and Samoa on day two of the Gold Coast Sevens World Series at Skilled Park on November 26, 2011 in Gold Coast, Australia. (Photo by Mark Nolan/Getty Images) Wales Sevens SquadTom HabberfieldHarry RobinsonMathew PatchelAlex WalkerTom PrydieOwen B WilliamsIfan EvansRhys ShellardWill PriceRichie PughRichard SmithOwen P Williams Wales won the Gold Coast Plate final Wales will be looking to build on their success from last weekend’s efforts in Australia when they kick off proceedings in the Emirates Airline Dubai Rugby Sevens tomorrow.Paul John’s men made the quarter finals of the Cup competition before being knocked out by eventual champions Fiji in the opening event of the HSBC Sevens World Series on the Gold Coast Sevens.Wales bounced back to claim the Plate final, to secure 13 valuable points to find themselves in fifth place on the current series standings. The Wales squad know they are in for a tough time this weekend, as head coach Paul John explains.“Dubai has all been about trying to get the boys fully recovered and ready for Friday’s group games,” he explained. “We’ve had a different preparation because we are playing our first game at 9.20am (local time) therefore we have to get up really early to get a substantial breakfast so the boys can refuel. Our first games last week were 1pm! “We play Scotland first and they were really tough last week. We had to work really hard before beating them. Then we’ve got Canada second. They won the Pan Am Games last month so that will be tough as well as they are a very good team.“Our final game will be against Australia who reached the semi finals of the main draw last week so once again we find ourselves in an extremely competitive group. The boys trained really well this morning and are now looking forward to starting the competition.” LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

first_imgConsistently personified: Mike Brown is having a standout Six Nations tournament at full-back for EnglandBy Charlie MorganBefore this weekend there were (theoretically speaking) five sides still in the Championship hunt. Wales left the running after being comprehensively downed at Twickenham, while Ireland brushed off a hard-working Italy and France somehow sneaked past Scotland. Now just three teams can still taste glory. But which individuals stood out? Here’s our Six Nations team of Round 4.15. Mike Brown (England)Brown is enjoying a patch as purple as England’s garish warm-up jackets – the Harlequin has not endured anything close to an off-day this season. Wales paid dearly for a brainless deep kicking game and were powerless to prevent England’s full-back from carrying 154 running metres and beating seven defenders with some typically  incisive counter-attacks. Player of the tournament accolades surely await.14. Andrew Trimble (Ireland)Trimble took his try well on the opposite wing after capitalising on some sorcery from Brian O’Driscoll, but the less showy stuff – carries close to the ruck and from restarts – was just as important in overturning Italy. That provincial team-mate Tommy Bowe is not required in Paris speaks volumes for Trimble’s electric Six Nations.Handful: Trimble is excelling in Tommy Bowe’s boots13. Brian O’Driscoll (Ireland)Talisman, role-model, icon – as he struggled to hold back the tears at full-time and insisted someone else deserved the man-of-the-match award, O’Driscoll personified those words. Earlier, a dazzlingly dextrous display had reminded Dublin that he has also been a wonderful entertainer. One we will all miss dreadfully.12. Billy Twelvetrees (England)Soaking up Jamie Roberts’ physicality is a seriously tough task, and Twelvetrees showed mighty effort to reduce the impact of his illustrious, in-form adversary. Intelligence in attack – epitomised by the delicious grubber for Luther Burrell’s try – complemented customary guts throughout an increasingly assured performance.11. Yoann Huget (France)There’s no escaping the fact that France were once abysmal. That said, they still sneaked an unlikely victory and unthinkably remain in the running to clinch the Championship crown. Huget’s intuitive interception – Scotland were home and dry had he misjudged it – hauled Les Bleus back from the brink. The in-form wing may have come unstuck for Stuart Hogg’s early try, but he wholly redeemed himself.10. Johnny Sexton (Ireland)Sexton was the best fly-half on show a fortnight ago despite being slightly below par during the loss to England. The Italians weren’t so lucky and got hit by a 17-point haul including two tries. When the Racing Metro waltzes to the gainline with runners carving dangerous lines all around him, it is a wonderful sight.Flying machine: Huget has been a constant threat9. Greig Laidlaw (Scotland)There was another moment of superb opportunism from Danny Care, but Laidlaw impressed as well. Aided by Scott Johnson’s selection up front (who’d have thought that picking your best players actually works?), the scrum-half had a decent platform. He made sharper decisions and guided Scotland painfuly close to a gritty win. 8. Ben Morgan (England)Billy Vunipola’s ankle injury left a hefty 19st sized-hole in England’s plans for the Wales revenge mission, but Morgan stepped up admirably. Hugely improved fitness levels allowed him to combine 13 tackles with 15 carries – big numbers – and there was also some deft distribution that linked England’s attacks well. An afternoon that proved the Gloucester man’s worth to Stuart Lancaster. 1. Ryan Grant (Scotland)         When a loosehead prop packs 12 carries into an afternoon and is part of a scrum in the ascendancy, he has more than earned his corn. Grant grew more prominent as Scotland looked to have sewn things up things up in the second half and really didn’t deserve to be on the losing side.2. Leonardo Ghiraldini (Italy)This tenacious Treviso hooker may have struggled slightly at set-piece against one of the best lineouts in the world, but he gave another lion-hearted showing elsewhere. Ghiraldini recorded an immense 18 tackles in 70 minutes and was effective with a handful on trundles on the rare occasions Italy were in possession.3. David Wilson (England)Mike Ross was solid for Ireland opposite dangerous Albert de Marchi and looks intent on holding off Martin Moore, a highly-rated contender for his starting slot. Wilson was outstanding though. Outmanoevred at the first scrum, he subsequently mauled Gethin Jenkins, sending the Lions loosehead to the sin bin and allowing dead-eye Owen Farrell to boot nine points for England. Throw in a superb midfield break, an out-the-back offload and a team-high tally of 38 ruck attendances and Dan Cole has a genuine contender.4. Richie Gray (Scotland)Gray may have seemed flat of late, but he saved his Test best for France – the blond giant dismantled the French lineout alongside engine room buddy Jim Hamilton and caused chaos elsewhere. Showed fine awareness and skill to step in a scrum-half prior to Hogg’s score, too.Big shift: Ryan Grant put in 12 tackles5. Courtney Lawes (England)There was a suggestion that Wales may have been lacking vital experience at half-back and Stuart Lancaster’s enforcer rammed that home, charging down Rhys Webb once and lurking, menacingly in Rhys Priestland’s peripheral. Lawes loped around the park to devastating effect, marrying subtle handling with raw athleticism. His tussle with New Zealand’s Sam Whitelock in June will be special.6. Tom Wood (England)A terrifically spiky shift from one of the tournament’s most underrated players. Another Englishman to thrive on deflating opponents’ reputations, Wood made the much-vaunted Wales back-row look one-paced and topped the game’s tackle-count with 16.7. Alexandre Lapandry (France)With the French front row experiencing difficulties, Philipe Saint-André’s number seven needed to scrap doggedly in the Murrayfield mud. Lapandry managed exactly that and was mighty industrious as part of an unfamiliar back row, tackling relentlessly and proving to be a severe nuisance on the deck. DUBLIN, IRELAND – MARCH 08: Andrew Trimble of Ireland is tackled by Leonardo Sarto of Italy during the RBS Six Nations match between Ireland and Italy at Aviva Stadium on March 8, 2014 in Dublin, Ireland. (Photo by Ben Hoskins/Getty Images) LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

first_imgWhat’s hot and what’s not from the final round two game of the 2016 Six Nations Three up: Jonathan Joseph scored an 18-minute hat-trick in the second half. Photo: Getty Images Man of the Match: Ben Youngs (England)For the latest Rugby World subscription offers, click here. 134 – The number of tackles made by England compared to 79 by Italy.7 – The number of line breaks made by England compared to one by Italy.65 – The number of metres made by Jonathan Joseph, more than any other player. Michele Campagnaro made 54 metres, the most of any Italian player.17 – The number of carries made by Billy Vunipola, more than any other. Sergio Parisse made 15 for Itaky.Italy: L McLean; L Sarto, M Campagnaro, G Garcia (A Pratichetti 33), M Bellini; C Canna (E Padovani 61), E Gori (G Palazzani 75); A Lovotti (M Zanusso 63), O Gega (D Giazzon ht), L Cittadini (M Castrogiovanni 59), G Biagi, M Fuser (V Bernabo 15), F Minto, A Zanni (A Steyn 31), S Parisse (capt).Pens: Canna 3.England: M Brown (A Goode 70); A Watson, J Joseph, O Farrell (A Goode 16-22), J Nowell; G Ford, B Youngs (D Care 55); M Vunipola (J Marler 48), D Hartley (capt, J George 70), D Cole (P Hill 70), C Lawes (J Launchbury 48), G Kruis, C Robshaw (J Clifford 63), J Haskell (M Itoje 55), B Vunipola.Tries: Ford, Joseph 3, Farrell. Cons: Farrell 3. Pens: Farrell 2, Ford.Referee: Glen Jackson (New Zealand) LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS TAGS: Highlight Jonathan Joseph scored a second-half hat-trick as England overcame Italy in Rome and moved into top spot in the Six Nations table, ahead of France on points difference. Eddie Jones’s team ran in five tries in all, George Ford and Owen Farrell also crossing. Their first-half performance was disjointed and underwhelming, but they managed to break clear of a determined Italian side in the last 30 minutes. The turning point came when Joseph scored under the posts after intercepting a poor Leonardo Sarto pass in the 53rd minute as Italy tried to attack from their own half. From then on, England were in control.WHAT’S HOT…All-round skills – Last week it was Mako Vunipola, a prop, with the neat pop pass that set up Jack Nowell’s crucial try. This time it was brother Billy with the soft offload that allowed Owen Farrell to send George Ford in the corner for England’s first try. Jamie George provided another neat offload for Farrell to score under the posts.Corner stop: George Ford touches down the first of England’s five tries. Photo: Getty ImagesThen we had wing Anthony Watson ripping the ball off Gonzalo Garcia in the tackle as well as having an influence at the breakdown. It just goes to show that in the professional game, both forwards and backs need to be able to develop these sort of skills.Italian spirit – Italy players are known for getting emotional when singing their anthem and it was certainly the case here, Sergio Parisse looking particularly fired up. Yet their passion was allied with a new control to their game. Carlo Canna and Edoardo Gori dictated play from half-back with centres Michele Campagnaro and Gonzalo Garcia (while he was on the field at least) finding holes in England’s defence. They were keen to attack close to the gain-line and put pressure on their visitors, reaping the benefits of England’s ill-discipline. Whether Eddie Jones’s pre-match rhetoric provided Italy with extra inspiration, it’s hard to know, but they certainly played with more organisation and ambition than we have witnessed in recent years, though the interception try dented their confidence for the final half-hour.Centre of attention: Michele Campagnaro was the standout performer for Italy. Photo: Getty ImagesBench pressure – England were able to make changes by choice in contrast to Italy’s injury-enforced ones, and their replacements certainly made a difference. The arrival of Maro Itoje, Jack Clifford and Joe Launchbury saw England get more quick ball at the breakdown, Danny Care brought a spark from scrum-half, his clever grubber kick resulting in Joseph’s second try, while Joe Marler delivered aggression at the scrum and tackle area. The selection meetings ahead of the Ireland game should be interesting!WHAT’S NOT…Ill-discipline – England’s penalty count must be Eddie Jones’s biggest concern after two rounds of the Six Nations – 13 here and 12 at Murrayfield. They allowed Italy to get a foothold in the game and on the scoreboard by conceding avoidable penalties – not rolling away after the tackle, hitting high, coming in at the side and so on. They need to tighten up discipline-wise going into the last three rounds, where they will face the championship’s better teams, or they are likely to be on the end of a defeat.Inconsistent: Chris Robshaw wins a lineout but England struggled in that area. Photo: Getty ImagesEngland’s lineout – The second biggest worry for England’s coaches will be the lineout. They lacked accuracy at the set-piece, perhaps overcomplicating matters when the simple call would have been more effective, and lost four on their own throw – a statistic that will not please Steve Borthwick. What can be achieved was evident in the build-up to Jonathan Joseph’s second try, a strong driving maul giving Danny Care the position to kick through for his centre to dab down. Unfortunately from England’s perspective, this sort of platform was not a common occurrence.Italian injuries – Italy lost three players to injury within the first 32 minutes, with Alessandro Zanni and Gonzalo Garcia particular blows. Flanker Zanni brings huge physicality and work-rate while centre Garcia was carrying strongly and picking good lines before his departure. Their experience and nous was missed in the second period.Happy day: England fans enjoy the atmosphere in Rome. Photo: Getty ImagesSTATISTICSlast_img read more

first_img TAGS: Japan Making sparks fly: Gifu is famed for its swords LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS The Adventurer If you’re interested in taking a peek into everyday Japanese life, go on a cycle tour with the Satoyama Experience (satoyama-experience.com), where you can ride through rice paddies and farming villages in the countryside with an English-speaking tour guide.To bask in Japan’s majestic nature, head to Hida Osaka Falls, where you can hike around a treasure trove of waterfalls and streams that flow through the forest.Natural beauty: Hida Osaka Falls is a great place to hikeYou can also hike up Mount Kinka to get views of Gifu City and the Nagara River – and you’ll be rewarded with the sight of Gifu Castle at the top.The Party Animal The World Cup coincides with the Takayama Festival on 9-10 October. Every year more than 200,000 people from across Japan and the rest of the world come to celebrate.The festival – safeguarded by UNESCO Intangible Cultural Heritage – is one of Japan’s three most beautiful festivals and showcases a high level of craftsmanship with exquisite festival floats parading through the streets of Takayama.For more travel information…http://travel.kankou-gifu.jp/en/ Experience authentic Japan in this prefecture in central Honshu Advertising FeatureJapan 2019 Travel Guide: GifuHave an unforgettable experience and learn about the country’s traditional culture in the middle of the Japanese Alps…The Culture Vulture Ancient Japan continues to thrive in Gifu today. Located in the heart of Japan, the Gifu Prefecture flourished as a centre for trade and travel – and to see what life was like 300 years ago you can visit Shirakawa-go. The UNESCO World Heritage Site is a traditional Japanese village located in Takayama where you will find farmhouses with steep, thatched roofs.Gifu has long been known for its high-quality Japanese swords and at swordsmith studios like Asano Kajiya (asanokajiya.com/en) you can make your own kitchen knife utilising techniques that have been passed down for 700 years.Arts and crafts: You can do a workshop in traditional Japanese papermaking in GifuAt the Terada Washi Studio (govoyagin.com/pages/gifu) you can do a workshop in traditional Japanese papermaking. Other hands-on activities include pottery and indigo-dyeing.The Foodie Make sure you sample Hida beef, a title given to only the best-quality Japanese Black cattle bred in the Hida region of the prefecture. The meat is known for its rich flavour.A speciality in northern Gifu is hoba-yaki, which is succulent Hida beef grilled with fresh vegetables and a savoury miso paste on a large Japanese magnolia leaf.Local favourite: Hoba-yaki is a speciality in northern GifuThere are also 50 sake breweries in the prefecture, using water from the area’s many rivers, so be sure to check them out. How to get thereTake the bullet train from Tokyo to Nagoya (one hour, 40 minutes) and from there it’s a 20-minute train to Gifu. It’s a two-hour train from Gifu to Takayama. The nearest airports are Toyama, Komatsu and Central Japan.last_img read more

first_img By USPG staffPosted Jan 31, 2012 Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Belleville, IL Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Submit a Job Listing The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Pittsburgh, PA January 31, 2012 at 5:27 pm Darn right Jesus would support the 99% (or even 95%). Jesus’ theology was radical, anti-establishmentarian and he would not want to see such disparity in people’s situations as there are in Western societies. Rector Washington, DC Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York February 2, 2012 at 5:27 pm That’s right Christopher. Jesus’ kingdom is not of this world that means he doesn’t care what the kings of this world do…. Wait that doesn’t sound right. Tags Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Martinsville, VA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Bath, NC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Submit a Press Release Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Occupy Movement Press Release Service Rector Collierville, TN Rector Knoxville, TN Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Featured Events Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Christina McCann says: In London, Occupy movement says Jesus would join them Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA center_img Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Michael Cadaret says: The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Curate Diocese of Nebraska An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET January 31, 2012 at 6:20 pm So that whole “My kingdom is not of this world” business goes right into the garbage can then? The infinitely-malleable Episcopal Jesus, who was created in the Episcopal Church’s own image and likeness and who believes whatever Epicopalians need him to believe, never ceases to fascinate. Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Tampa, FL Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Albany, NY Rector Smithfield, NC Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Director of Music Morristown, NJ Comments are closed. Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Shreveport, LA Submit an Event Listing Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Anglican Communion, TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Christopher Johnson says: [USPG] Residents of the Occupy London camp outside St. Paul’s Cathedral are challenging church and society to consider their stance on global economics.Speaking to the U.K.-based USPG mission agency, residents of the campsite – now passed its 100th day – were clear in their belief that Christians should stand on the side of the marginalized and the poor, and against the drive for profit at any cost.Resident Tammy Samede said: “Jesus himself was a protester. He fought for economic and social justice. He threw the money lenders out of the temple because they were taking advantage of the poor.”Samede expressed her gratitude for Christian support for Occupy London – including plans for a Prayer Circle to be formed around the camp on the day when eviction orders are finally issued (expected at the end of January).Campaigner George Barda said: “We are part of a global movement. If enough people are inspired, we have a chance of tackling global injustice issues. We have a system in which profit is put above development and the environment. Anything to do with values is way down the pecking order, so we are desperately trying to pick up the pieces caused by the institutionalized drive to maximize profit.“This is about establishing a global framework that will tackle poverty and injustice. I support the idea of compassionate revolution. This was Jesus’ message. He talked about turning the world upside down. We need to take power from the top and redistribute it to the majority on a compassionate basis.”Matthew Varnham, a resident who also acts as the campsite’s legal liaison, said: “We’re not saying we have the answer. This is all about encouraging people to have a discussion about what we want our society to look like and what we want our world to look like.“The Occupy movement represents an opportunity to really engage with issues in a way that hasn’t been available before. The momentum is here – we should make the most of it.”USPG Chief Executive Janette O’Neill explained that USPG is actively working with international church partners to tackle injustice and the poverty gap. “Whatever your view of Occupy, they are bringing important issues to the attention of society and the church,” she said. “In all of this, we pray that Christ’s message will be uppermost, urging us all to choose compassion and justice over greed.” Comments (3) Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Hopkinsville, KY Associate Rector Columbus, GA Advocacy Peace & Justice, Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJlast_img read more

first_img Youth Minister Lorton, VA By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Jun 22, 2013 Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Video Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Rector Columbus, GA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Submit a Press Release Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Shreveport, LA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Director of Music Morristown, NJ Bishop Stacy Sauls speaks to [email protected] on domestic mission Press Release Service Rector Pittsburgh, PA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York [2] 210. Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Featured Events Tags Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS [1] 210. Rector Tampa, FL Rector Collierville, TN The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit an Event Listing Rector Belleville, IL Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 [Episcopal News Service – Burlingame, California] Bishop Stacy Sauls, the Episcopal Church’s chief operating officer, addresses the Episcopal Asiamerica Ministries @ 40 gathering, June 21 on the topic of “Domestic Mission: Focus on the Poor.”The full text follows.The Shoe Shine ManIt’s funny where you run into Jesus if you’re paying attention.  I met him once in the Cincinnati Airport, which when I was Bishop of Lexington, we preferred to call the Northern Kentucky Airport. On this particular day, Jesus was shining shoes, and mine happened to need shining.  Isn’t that just like Jesus?  On the night before he died, he washed the disciples’ feet.“You live near here?” he asked.“In Lexington.”“Just down the street,” he noted.“That’s right,” I said.  “Have you always lived here?” I asked him this time.“All my life.”‘We’ve lived in Lexington five years,” I contributed to the conversation, “and we really like coming to Cincinnati.  There’s a lot here and it isn’t so big that it’s unmanageable.”“Yes, Cincinnati’s a nice town.”Then, Jesus abruptly changed the subject.  I think my attempt at small talk must have been annoying to the Lord, and God knows, a distraction from what I needed to be dealing with.  He then continued, “I’m one of eight.  My wife is one of 11.”  Strangely, I was not disturbed by that bit of information I’d never heard about Jesus before.“Wow,” I responded, reflecting for a moment on the complications that go with having two children and thinking about how his parents, Mary and Joseph, and his wife’s parents, names unknown, did it.“Yes, Cincinnati’s got a lot of nice memories, happy times, brothers and sisters, and all of them have children and grandchildren.”“Y’all get together a lot?” I inquired, my introvert’s mind sort of spinning at the thought of it.“All the time. All the time.  That what it’s all about.”  That was good to know, I thought, because I spend a lot of time wondering what’s it all about.  He went on.  “Anybody who doesn’t get that just doesn’t have their head straight.  If you can’t get along with your brothers and sisters, well then, you can’t get along with me.  Some tells me they haven’t spoken to their brother in six years or they don’t get along with their sister, I say, ‘Get away from me.’  If you can’t get along with your own brothers and sisters, well then, you can’t get along with me.”I got down from the chair, paid for the shoe shine, and tipped Jesus $2.  That was a lot, I figured, since most people only tip Jesus $1 on Sunday mornings.  And I said, “Thank you, Jesus, for speaking to me this morning and reminding me of what I need to know.”  I didn’t say that part out loud.  I knew Jesus could hear me.“If you can’t get along with your brothers and sisters, well then, you can’t get along with me.”  You can’t get along with me, the shoe shine man, and you can’t get along with me, Jesus, either.  I think I remember having heard something like that before.“Those who say, ‘I love God,’ and hate their brothers and sisters, are liars; for those who do not love a brother or sister whom they have seen, cannot love God whom they have not seen.  The commandment we have from him is this:  those who love God must love their brother and sister also” (1 Jn. 4:20-21).  It was John who said that, not Jesus, but I think John probably heard it from Jesus, maybe while Jesus was shining his shoes.Now before the festival of the Passover, Jesus knew that his hour had come to depart from this world and go to the Father. Having loved his own who were in the world, he loved them to the end.  The devil had already put it into the heart of Judas son of Simon Iscariot to betray him. And during supper Jesus, knowing that the Father had given all things into his hands, and that he had come from God and was going to God, got up from the table, took off his outer robe, and tied a towel around himself.  Then he poured water into a basin and began to wash the disciples’ feet and to wipe them with the towel that was tied around him.  He came to Simon Peter, who said to him, “Lord, are you going to wash my feet?”  Jesus answered, “You do not know now what I am doing, but later you will understand.”  Peter said to him, “You will never wash my feet.”  Jesus answered, “Unless I wash you, you have no share with me.” Simon Peter said to him, “Lord, not my feet only but also my hands and my head!”  Jesus said to him, “One who has bathed does not need to wash, except for the feet, but is entirely clean. And you are clean, though not all of you.”  For he knew who was to betray him; for this reason he said, “Not all of you are clean.”  After he had washed their feet, had put on his robe, and had returned to the table, he said to them, “Do you know what I have done to you?  You call me Teacher and Lord—and you are right, for that is what I am.  So if I, your Lord and Teacher, have washed your feet, you also ought to wash one another’s feet.  For I have set you an example, that you also should do as I have done to you.  Very truly, I tell you, servants are not greater than their master, nor are messengers greater than the one who sent them.  If you know these things, you are blessed if you do them.”  [Jn. 13:1-17]We tend to see this passage as extolling the virtues of servanthood.  That’s an interesting word, servanthood.  It’s not really a word at all.  It’s a church word.  Sometimes we invent church words to shield ourselves from harsh realities.  Jesus wasn’t saying anything about some church-invented abstraction called servanthood.  He was saying, be a servant. That’s the stark reality.  Actually, of course, it’s starker than that.  He was saying be a slave.  Servant is another church word, a euphemism.  In other words, be poor.  Be very poor.  The poorest of the poor.  It’s even more startling than “be among the poor.”  He’s saying to be the poor yourself.  He is saying to be a shoe shine man.  Perhaps it is my prejudice, but I assume most shoe shine men are not rolling in excess cash.  Maybe I’m wrong about that, but it did not escape my attention that the shoe shine man at the airport that day, which is to say Jesus, was a black man, and that most of the shoe shine men I’ve encountered in my life were black men, the exception being in New York, where Jesus as I experience him in the shining of shoes tends to be a Hispanic woman.  No wonder we created a churchy euphemism to deal with it.Just one chapter before this event on the night before his own death as the story reaches its climax, just before he entered Jerusalem, Jesus stopped in Bethany at the home of Lazarus, Mary, and Martha.  As usual, Martha did the serving.  Lazarus sat at the table.  The new element in the story is this.Mary took a pound of costly perfume made of pure nard, anointed Jesus’ feet, and wiped them with her hair. The house was filled with the fragrance of the perfume.  But Judas Iscariot, one of his disciples (the one who was about to betray him), said, “Why was this perfume not sold for three hundred denarii and the money given to the poor?”  (He said this not because he cared about the poor, but because he was a thief; he kept the common purse and used to steal what was put into it.)  Jesus said, “Leave her alone. She bought it so that she might keep it for the day of my burial.  You always have the poor with you, but you do not always have me.” [Jn. 12:3-8]This is perhaps one of the strangest things Jesus ever said.  It is very interesting to me for several reasons.  One of them is that this passage about the poor has parallels in two of the synoptic gospels, Matthew and Mark (interestingly, there is no parallel to this saying about the poor in Luke). There aren’t a lot of overlaps between John and the synoptic gospels—only the really, really important things.  This is one of them.What does Jesus mean by this teaching that seems strange to my ears, what appears to be an upholding of religious devotion over devotion to the poor, so counter is it to the way I understand Matthew 25, in which I think Jesus is saying that it is in people who are poor we meet Jesus himself?  This saying about always having the poor with you just doesn’t much sound like Jesus to me.Both Matthew and Mark tell the story a little differently, but they, like John, also place it just before the story of the passion heads toward its climax, even closer to the end of the story than John places it, in fact. Mark tells the story this way.While he was at Bethany in the house of Simon the leper, as he sat at the table, a woman came with an alabaster jar of very costly ointment of nard, and she broke open the jar and poured the ointment on his head.  But some were there who said to one another in anger, “Why was the ointment wasted in this way?  For this ointment could have been sold for more than three hundred denarii, and the money given to the poor.” And they scolded her.  But Jesus said, “Let her alone; why do you trouble her?  She has performed a good service for me.  For you always have the poor with you, and you can show kindness to them whenever you wish; but you will not always have me.  She has done what she could; she has anointed my body beforehand for its burial.  Truly I tell you, wherever the good news is proclaimed in the whole world, what she has done will be told in remembrance of her.”  [Mk. 14:3-9]Judas also fits into the story, just as in Luke.  It’s the next verse.  “Then Judas Iscariot, who was one of the twelve, went to the chief priests in order to betray him.”  It is the same in Matthew.  Judas comes off badly in all Matthew, Mark, and John, but there is a key difference.  In Mark and Matthew it is the reason for the betrayal.  Maybe, as John suggests, it has something to do with being thwarted in his embezzlement scheme by this unexpected appropriation of funds to buy oil.  Or maybe, as I think Mark and Matthew are trying to tell us, it is something deeper.  Could it be that the sacramental teaching going on here is too difficult for all but the most committed, the most faithful?  Is it just too upsetting to the way things are?  Is it not just Judas who is embezzling from the poor?  Could it be the rest of us, too?  So what is the sacramental teaching?Mark and Matthew are perhaps a little easier to read because of their choice of contexts, the home of Simon the leper rather than the home of Lazarus, Martha, and Mary.  The context, as Jim Wallis helpfully points out in his book, God’s Politics, is one of extreme marginalization.[1]  When Jesus said, “You always have the poor with you, and you can show kindness to them whenever you wish,” he was not suggesting we had an excuse to do nothing about the plight of the poor, which is how wealthier Christians, such as us, tend to hear it or have been taught to hear it or maybe have to hear it or we’d run screaming out of the door.  He was saying that it went without saying that his followers would always be in proximity to the poor.  He was not saying you will always have the poor, so don’t worry about it.  He was saying you will always be in proximity to the poor precisely because you are my disciples.  Wallis paraphrases Jesus this way:  “You know who we spend our time with, who we share meals with, who listens to our message, who we focus our attention on. You’ve been watching me, and you know what my priorities are.  You know who comes first in the kingdom of God.  So, you will always be near the poor, you’ll always be with them, and you will always have the opportunity to share with them.”[2]  I also owe Wallis for the insight that Jesus is referring back to Deuteronomy 15:11 and its necessary implication:  “Since there will never cease to be some in need on the earth, I therefore command you, ‘Open your hand to the poor and needy neighbor in your land.’”But back to John.  There the relevant context is not that the story takes place in the home of Simon the leper but that it is placed in such close proximity to the washing of feet.  The other clue is that it is Judas who objects to what is going on.  John adds his own explanation of why—“he said this not because he cared about the poor, but because he was a thief; he kept the common purse and used to steal what was put into it.”  Maybe.  But I don’t think it’s that simple.Here is what I think this is all about.  Given that Jesus would assume that his disciples, of all people, would always be in proximity to the poor and that it certainly doesn’t sound like Jesus to be saying that the poor are of no concern to us, could it be that what Jesus is trying to say, when you think ahead in the story to the washing of feet, is that he and the poor are one?  The point is not the poor as an abstraction.  It is the poor as an incarnate reality, and in particular one poor person at a time whether that be the shoe shine man or the single mother feeding her children from food stamps or the hospice patient rescued by the Sisters of Charity from the streets of Calcutta or an Appalachian child in danger of being trapped in an endless cycle of poverty because she cannot read just as her parents and grandparents could not?  Could it be that Jesus is saying that the point is not the poor as if the poor were an abstraction and the point is not poverty as if poverty were nothing more than a social issue?  Could it be that Jesus was saying, is saying, to stop wasting time on the poor as an unidentified mass of humanity or on poverty as a subject rich white people talk about over cocktails, to stop dealing with poor people, who have a tendency to be anonymous, and start dealing with people who are poor, who do not?  Could it be that Jesus was saying, is saying, to start being with the poor, indeed to start being the poor?  And I think the reason for that is that it is in poor people that we meet Jesus.It is like a very wise woman Jim Wallis wrote about named Mary Glover.  He describes her as an old Pentecostal woman in his neighborhood, a self-appointed missionary in a poor community, and a regular volunteer at the community food pantry.  She herself was poor and needed a bag of groceries from the pantry each week herself.  It was Mary’s job to pray on most Saturday mornings before the doors of the pantry were opened.  I want to share her prayer with you.  “Thank you, Lord, for waking us up this morning!  Thank you, Lord, that our walls were not our grave and our bed was not our cooling board!  Thank you, Lord!”  And she always ended with these words as the doors were about to be opened to a long line of people waiting in the rain, the cold, and the heat for a bag of groceries.  “Lord, we know that you’ll be coming through this line today, so Lord, help us to treat you well.”  It makes me wonder if this Mary might not turn out to be the previously anonymous woman with the oil, or at least a close relative.  There is not an ounce of ministering to in it.  (By the way, I am of the opinion that when people start talking about “ministering to,” it is time to head for the hills.)  It is all sacrament—an outward and visible sign of an inward and spiritual grace to see the Lord as he presents himself to us, in the poor, and offers an invitation not to minister to but live with.“You always have the poor—as an issue, as an abstraction, as an anonymous intellectual thing, as a problem—with you.  But you do not always have me, a person who is poor.”  Could it be that Jesus is saying to stop worrying about how to sell the expensive ointment to raise money for the poor and start pouring the ointment on people who are poor?  There is nothing about this worth very much, after all, if we do not have Jesus with us.  And if you, or the people you serve, think that is somehow antithetical to the poor, that is deeply disturbing and quite a loss and the sacramental equivalent of teaching them that the Eucharist doesn’t really matter.Here’s the deal.  It is 100% sacramental.  It is about being with Jesus.  Jesus said we would experience that grace in the bread and wine.  And he said we would experience it in the poor.  And, if so, I suspect the reason for that is not that Jesus doesn’t recognize the importance of dealing with the systems that cause poverty.  I suspect the reason is that Jesus knows that there is never going to be an effective dealing with those systems until they are being dealt with by people who have been converted by being with Jesus.  Dealing with the poor as an abstraction is a nice, altruistic thing.  Solidarity with the poor as if they were Jesus, because they are, is a much more radical thing, a thing that will turn our whole word completely upside down, a thing that, if we take it seriously, might even get us into the kingdom of God.On the night before he died, Jesus created a sacrament.  For the communities that gathered around Matthew, Mark, and Luke, the sacrament is in the breaking of bread and the sharing of the cup, what we know as the Eucharist.  They were not unaware of the importance of meeting Jesus in the poor, but that came for them earlier in the story, and the climax of the story  to be remembered in the anamnesis sense in the meal Jesus shared with them.For the community that gathered around the Gospel of John, the sacrament through which they experienced the real presence was in the washing of feet.  Like their brothers and sisters, they were not unaware of the importance of the Eucharistic meal, but that had come earlier in the story for them and the climactic action by which they remembered and entered into the passion of Christ was in becoming as a slave, becoming poor.  The two are, of course, related.  In fact, they are the same thing, Eucharist and solidarity with the poor.This is one thing Roman Catholics have all over us.  They call the primary sacrament the Mass.  Sometimes we do, too, but not that often.  I wish we would more.Roman Catholics name their primary sacrament the Mass, which is derived from the Latin for dismissal.  They make a very important point that the focus may be on the Body of Christ broken in the bread and the Blood of Christ poured out in the wine.  But the only context in which that makes any sense at all is only in the dismissal, the moment of “Go forth in the name of Christ,” or “Go in peace to love and sere the Lord.”  In other words, get out of here and, having been fed with Christ’s broken body and shed blood, go break yourselves and shed a little blood of your own and serve those who are poor, and meet me there among them because that’s where I, Jesus, will be.  Or if you dare, become poor and follow me.  They, the Eucharist and the sacrament of the poor, are two outward and visible signs of the same inward and spiritual grace, which is Jesus, only Jesus.Thank you.The Rt. Rev. Stacy F. SaulsChief Operating OfficerThe Episcopal Church Rector Knoxville, TN Curate Diocese of Nebraska Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Martinsville, VA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Ethnic Ministries, Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Featured Jobs & Calls Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Submit a Job Listing Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Bath, NC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Washington, DC Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Albany, NY Rector Hopkinsville, KYlast_img read more

first_img Anglican Communion, Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Ecumenical & Interreligious Tags Press Release Service Featured Jobs & Calls The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Tampa, FL Rector Hopkinsville, KY Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Shreveport, LA Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Featured Events Canada Joint Assembly, Youth Minister Lorton, VA Submit a Job Listing Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Associate Rector Columbus, GA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Submit an Event Listing Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL center_img Rector Smithfield, NC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Washington, DC Rector Belleville, IL Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Collierville, TN Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Submit a Press Release Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Bath, NC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Albany, NY Following the passing of the resolution, the Primate invited the delegates to stand and read it aloud. Photo: Art Babych[Anglican Journal] The Anglican-Lutheran Joint Assembly on July 5 passed, by a vote of 98 per cent, a joint declaration focusing on the issues of homelessness in Canada and “responsible resource extraction” involving Canadian companies in Canada and overseas.No one spoke out against the declaration when it was presented for debate on the floor, but a number stood to express support.The Rev. Kenn Ward, an ELCIC pastor, made an emotional plea for the declaration, citing how his friend, Katherine Baiya, a Congolese refugee now living in Winnipeg, asked him once what churches are doing to end rape and other human rights abuses resulting from the mineral wealth in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. “She [Baiya] said, ‘It’s your mining companies who have done this to us.’ ”Ward said the “terror and tragedy” hit home when Baiya shared news that her sister had recently been hacked to death in the Congo, leaving behind five children. “This motion is a small thing, but at least I can take this back to her and say, ‘We’re trying to do something,’ ” said Ward. Ward’s congregation in Sherwood Park, Winnipeg, shares ministry with Baiya’s black Pentecostal congregation, Good Seed.The Rev. Iola Metuq, Anglican diocese of the Arctic, noted how mining companies operating in Nunavut “get billions of dollars from our land,” while indigenous people are left with “pollution, contaminated animals.”The declaration commits the Anglican Church of Canada and the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada to work together in raising public awareness, “to discern where and how we can make a difference, to act where we can, and to advocate for equitable and innovative approaches to the challenges that we share.” The two churches—in full communion since 2011—also vowed to pray “for all affected by these issues and those who bear responsibility in addressing them.”On the issue of “responsible resource extraction,” the declaration commits the churches to support indigenous communities in Canada and abroad “in exercising the right to Free, Prior and Informed Consent” with regard to development projects that affect their traditional territories. It also promises to “advocate for responsible and ethical investment in both Canada and around the world.”The declaration notes that Canadian companies are “major players” in mining, energy production and resource extraction across Canada and overseas. “They generate wealth for our societies, but they also give rise to serious and complex environmental, socio-economic, and human rights issues,” it states.On the issue of homelessness, the declaration commits the two churches to “advocate for renewed federal funding” and for an “integrated national collaborative strategy and greater accountability on the part of provinces and municipalities” in addressing homelessness and substandard housing.“As we look across Canada, we are disturbed by the reality that around 400,000 people are without a healthy place to live and that homelessness has continued to increase despite years of unprecedented economic growth and prosperity in our country,” the declaration states.A number of aboriginal Anglicans stood to express support for the declaration, noting how homelessness and substandard housing are issues that affect a large indigenous population, a number of whom are Indian residential school survivors.Sylvia James, a First Nation Cree who sat at the assembly as a partner with no voting privileges, urged the assembly to support the motion. She spoke about the plight of First Nations people forced to live in motels because their homes have been damaged by floods, or those who continue to live in mouldy homes on reserves, or those who have been transferred to locations that are “in the middle of nowhere.”The declaration notes that many, particularly the working poor, are unable to find affordable housing. “The costs in terms of human suffering are staggering, as are the additional burdens for health care and social services,” it says.While churches help by providing a broad range of services and support for the homeless and the working poor, these are not enough, it adds.The declaration carries a promise by the churches to act by “nurturing and supporting” their own agencies and programs that work with and for the homeless, the under-housed and refugees.On the issue of resource extraction, the declaration expresses concern that recent Canadian legislation (Bills C-38 and C-45) has made changes to environmental legislation and assessment processes “that potentially threaten the ecological integrity of areas under proposed development.”Resource extraction and development projects “often cross the traditional territories of Indigenous peoples without their Free, Prior and Informed Consent, a right enshrined in the UN Declaration of the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, to which Canada is a signatory nation,” adds the declaration. Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Canada: Joint Assembly approves declaration In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 By Marites N. SisonPosted Jul 5, 2013 This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Martinsville, VAlast_img read more

first_img Video Posted Apr 11, 2014 Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Tampa, FL Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Reclaiming the Gospel of Peace 2014, Rector Bath, NC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Collierville, TN In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Pittsburgh, PA Submit an Event Listing Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Press Release Service Curate Diocese of Nebraska The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Submit a Press Release Rector Knoxville, TN Submit a Job Listing Rector Shreveport, LA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Featured Jobs & Calls Video: Lindsay Fry-Geier of New Hope Oklahoma [Episcopal News Service – Oklahoma City, Oklahoma] Lindsay Fry-Geier, executive director of New Hope Oklahoma, a Tulsa-based nonprofit organization that serves children of incarcerated men and women, talks about violence, its effects on community and providing services more than 400 children to break the cycle of generational violence. Rector Washington, DC This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Featured Events Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Director of Music Morristown, NJ Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Gun Violence, Advocacy Peace & Justice, The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Tags AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Smithfield, NC New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Belleville, IL An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Albany, NYlast_img read more

first_imgRIP: Sr. Lucy Shetters of the Community of St. Mary, Southern Province Posted Sep 2, 2014 Featured Events AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Hopkinsville, KY Submit a Press Release Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK The Rev. Mary Jane Francis says: Tags Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs September 2, 2014 at 9:49 pm Sr. Lucy touched all of us women at Sewanee. May her soul and the souls of all the departed rest in peace . Rector Belleville, IL Course Director Jerusalem, Israel September 2, 2014 at 1:41 pm Sr. Lucy and I were in the same seminary class at Sewanee. She was quiet and shy, but I remember her smile when she got tickled about something that was said. She was someone I always looked up to. May light perpetual shine upon her. The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Obituary, In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Comments (3) TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Collierville, TN Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Cathedral Dean Boise, ID People Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME On August 29, 2014, the Rev. Sister Lucy of the Community of St. Mary, Southern Province (aka Lucy Lee Shetters) died in her 80th year of life, the 58th year of her religious profession, and the 34th year of her priestly ordination. Sister was the first woman to be ordained in the Episcopal Diocese of Tennessee and was well known throughout the Diocese. She was a native of Tennessee, born in Sherwood in 1933, and entered the Community of St. Mary in 1954. Bishop Horace W.B. Donegan, then Bishop of New York and Visitor of the Community, presided at her religious profession on September 27, 1956. On Sept. 4, 1958, she was sent as a missionary Sister to Sagada in the Philippines, where she served for seven years. In the mid-sixties, she served briefly in the Community’s schools: St. Mary’s School in Peekskill, NY, and St. Mary’s School in Sewanee, TN. She also served briefly as the Assistant Superior (1966-68) and Novice Mistress (1968 -72) at the Mother House of the order in Peekskill, NY. In the early 1970s she was appointed the Sister-in-Charge of St. Mary’s Convent in Sewanee, where she helped develop the retreat center that later became known as St. Mary’s Sewanee. In 1977, Sr. Lucy entered the School of Theology at the University of the South in order to serve as a priest for the Community and for the congregation that came to its chapel. She was ordained a priest by the Right Rev. Bill Sanders on May 7, 1980. Shortly thereafter, in 1981, Grace Fellowship Church in Garnertown called her as its pastor. She was also sometime chaplain for the Companions of the Holy Cross. She also served, off and on, as Sister-in-Charge of the Southern Province of the Community of St. Mary for a total of 36 years. Under her leadership, the Community embraced liturgical change, negotiated a transfer of the ministry and the ownership of the retreat center to an independent board, built a ! new convent and moved to the Community’s present location, re-established a connection with the Mountain Province, Philippines, and received the remaining Sisters there into the Community of St. Mary, Southern Province, and established a branch house in Los Angeles.Sister Lucy was also asked by the Diocese of Tennessee to extend her priestly ministry beyond the convent chapel. From 1988 – 1993, she served as vicar of St James Episcopal mission and got the grant that enabled the mission to build its present sanctuary and bell tower. From 1994 – 2008, she served as vicar of Epiphany Mission in Sherwood, TN. From 2008 onward, Sr. Lucy continued to serve the congregation at the convent chapel and Grace Fellowship as she was able. Her health, however, worsened considerable in her remaining years. Her death freed her of all pain, reunited her with her Sisters and family who have gone before, and joined her forever with the God who loves her most dearly.Sister is preceded in death by her parents, Henry and Ruby Clark Shetters; her aunt, Linnie McBee; and her siblings: Johnny Shetters, Jerry Shetters, William Shetters, Letty Shetters. Her surviving relatives are Charles Shetters (Rockport, Texas), James Shetters (Aransas Pass, Texas), Roy Shetters (Ingleside, Texas), Bettie Kachele (Albuquerque, New Mexico), Linda Curtis (Decherd, TN) and Betty Sue Rollins (Sewanee, TN) her cousin.Sr. Lucy’s life and ministry will be celebrated at a memorial service on September 20th at All Saints Chapel at 11 o’clock, followed by a reception. This service will include any and all who have been touched by her ministry. Her funeral service and burial will be held later at the convent on September 27th at 11 o’clock. All are invited to that service and the reception as well. Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Submit an Event Listing Comments are closed. Rector Martinsville, VA center_img Submit a Job Listing This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Smithfield, NC Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Tampa, FL Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC The Rev. Dr. Margaret Shepard says: Rector Albany, NY New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Bath, NC Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET September 2, 2014 at 5:26 pm And you, Mary Robert, were the 2nd woman ordained in the diocese… and the first of 4 women ordained from the same congregation… St. David’s, Nashville, TN.I first met Sr. Lucy when a group of women from St. David’s went on retreat to St. Mary’s Convent in 1974. Her ordination was a wonderful occasion for all as she was greatly beloved in the diocese and had spoken up at our diocesan convention in favor of women’s ordination while it was being debated. As a quiet person she was not wont to speak, but told me that she was moved by the Spirit to do so and obeyed that nudging. She was my spiritual director for a number of years after my ordination, and remained a friend over the years. May she rest in peace. She will always live on in my memory. Rector Washington, DC Associate Rector Columbus, GA Featured Jobs & Calls Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Press Release Service The Rev. Mary C. Robert says: Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Shreveport, LA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Director of Music Morristown, NJ last_img read more