first_imgCommunity Capital of Vermont Receives $1,000 fromChittenden Bank For Micro Business ProgramBarre, Vermont Earlier this year Community Capital of Vermont acquired the Vermont Job Start Loan Fund, and as a result Community Capital has become the “go-to” place for micro business loan needs. Established 13 years ago, Community Capital of Vermont grants financing to start-up and expanding businesses that do not qualify for a traditional bank loan. In addition, they also provide post loan business management assistance.”We are pleased to provide Community Capital with a donation of $1,000 for their Micro Business Program. Chittenden Bank has been supporting businesses throughout Vermont for over 100 years, and we are proud to continue this tradition,” said Kathy Schirling, Senior Vice President at Chittenden Bank. “The funds donated by Chittenden Bank will be used to immediately provide micro businesses with direct one-on-one specialized assistance to help them stay in business and grow during these difficult economic times,” explained Emily Kaminsky, Director of Community Capital.Community Capital of Vermont helps Vermonters who have limited financial resources and income achieve economic self-sufficiency by encouraging self-employment. This current fund raising effort was established to help expand the Micro Business Loan fund program statewide, and provide all the necessary services to its participants. Thereby promoting growth and success for entrepreneurs starting up small businesses, and businesses owned by low to moderate-income individuals.About Community Capital of VermontCommunity Capital is located in Barre, Vermont and provides lending services and post loan assistance to micro businesses across the state not eligible for a traditional bank loan. For more information please visit www.communitycapitalvt.org(link is external) or call 802-479-0167.About Chittenden BankChittenden Bank has proudly served businesses and individuals statewide for more than 100 years. With assets greater than $3.3 billion and 47 offices located throughout the state, Chittenden is dedicated to meeting the financial needs of Vermonters at every stage of life. Chittenden Bank is a subsidiary of People’s United Bank headquartered in Bridgeport, Connecticut with assets of over $21 billion. For more information please visit www.chittenden.com(link is external) or call the Customer Service Center at 800-545-2236.last_img read more

first_imgChanges in South Korea undercut rationale for new Australian coal mine FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Newcastle Herald:For nearly a decade a South Korean Government-owned company has bought up land in the beautiful Bylong valley between Denman and Mudgee to establish a coal mine.KEPCO, which is 51 per cent owned by the government, identified Bylong as the place to mine high quality coal to export to South Korea and keep its coal-fired power stations delivering electricity to the domestic market.When it first scoped the project the world’s governments were not responding to increasingly alarming reports about the impacts of climate change, and the Hunter was riding a coal mining boom. A lot has changed since then. The Paris Agreement has committed the Australian Government to keeping global carbon emissions below 2 degrees Celsius. The mining boom has ended. Financial institutions and major corporations are turning their backs on coal for good and the cost of renewable energy is pricing coal out of electricity generation.Of more significance to the Bylong project is the election of a progressive South Korean Government in 2017 which pledged to address the twin issues of serious air pollution and carbon emissions by shifting away from coal-fired power generation and towards renewables. In the past few weeks the government has made the strongest signals yet about ramping up the reforms by adding new taxes on imported thermal coal and releasing a draft energy policy that significantly increases the shift to renewables.While KEPCO has argued the government moves do not impact the Bylong mine, it is hard to be optimistic about any new coal venture with a 25-year time frame.A new Australian Government report has warned of rough times ahead for coal, which rode out 2018 on an unexpected rally as China increased imports. While some analysts, including the Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis, warned that would be short-lived, coal backers welcomed a new dawn.More: Coal shifts in South Korea and China could mean big changes for the regionlast_img read more