first_imgAirtel Africa Plc (AIRTEL.ng) listed on the Nigerian Stock Exchange under the Technology sector has released it’s 2019 prospectus For more information about Airtel Africa Plc (AIRTEL.ng) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the Airtel Africa Plc (AIRTEL.ng) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: Airtel Africa Plc (AIRTEL.ng)  2019 prospectus Company ProfileAirtel Africa is a leading provider of telecommunications and mobile money services, with a presence in 14 countries in Africa, primarily in East Africa and Central and West Africa. Airtel Africa offers an integrated suite of telecommunications solutions to its subscribers, including mobile voice and data services as well as mobile money services both nationally and internationally. The Group aims to continue providing a simple and intuitive customer experience through streamlined customer journeys. Airtel Africa Plc is listed on the Nigeria Stock Exchangelast_img read more

first_img Youth Minister Lorton, VA By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Jun 22, 2013 Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Video Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Rector Columbus, GA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Submit a Press Release Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Shreveport, LA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Director of Music Morristown, NJ Bishop Stacy Sauls speaks to [email protected] on domestic mission Press Release Service Rector Pittsburgh, PA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York [2] 210. Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Featured Events Tags Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS [1] 210. Rector Tampa, FL Rector Collierville, TN The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit an Event Listing Rector Belleville, IL Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 [Episcopal News Service – Burlingame, California] Bishop Stacy Sauls, the Episcopal Church’s chief operating officer, addresses the Episcopal Asiamerica Ministries @ 40 gathering, June 21 on the topic of “Domestic Mission: Focus on the Poor.”The full text follows.The Shoe Shine ManIt’s funny where you run into Jesus if you’re paying attention.  I met him once in the Cincinnati Airport, which when I was Bishop of Lexington, we preferred to call the Northern Kentucky Airport. On this particular day, Jesus was shining shoes, and mine happened to need shining.  Isn’t that just like Jesus?  On the night before he died, he washed the disciples’ feet.“You live near here?” he asked.“In Lexington.”“Just down the street,” he noted.“That’s right,” I said.  “Have you always lived here?” I asked him this time.“All my life.”‘We’ve lived in Lexington five years,” I contributed to the conversation, “and we really like coming to Cincinnati.  There’s a lot here and it isn’t so big that it’s unmanageable.”“Yes, Cincinnati’s a nice town.”Then, Jesus abruptly changed the subject.  I think my attempt at small talk must have been annoying to the Lord, and God knows, a distraction from what I needed to be dealing with.  He then continued, “I’m one of eight.  My wife is one of 11.”  Strangely, I was not disturbed by that bit of information I’d never heard about Jesus before.“Wow,” I responded, reflecting for a moment on the complications that go with having two children and thinking about how his parents, Mary and Joseph, and his wife’s parents, names unknown, did it.“Yes, Cincinnati’s got a lot of nice memories, happy times, brothers and sisters, and all of them have children and grandchildren.”“Y’all get together a lot?” I inquired, my introvert’s mind sort of spinning at the thought of it.“All the time. All the time.  That what it’s all about.”  That was good to know, I thought, because I spend a lot of time wondering what’s it all about.  He went on.  “Anybody who doesn’t get that just doesn’t have their head straight.  If you can’t get along with your brothers and sisters, well then, you can’t get along with me.  Some tells me they haven’t spoken to their brother in six years or they don’t get along with their sister, I say, ‘Get away from me.’  If you can’t get along with your own brothers and sisters, well then, you can’t get along with me.”I got down from the chair, paid for the shoe shine, and tipped Jesus $2.  That was a lot, I figured, since most people only tip Jesus $1 on Sunday mornings.  And I said, “Thank you, Jesus, for speaking to me this morning and reminding me of what I need to know.”  I didn’t say that part out loud.  I knew Jesus could hear me.“If you can’t get along with your brothers and sisters, well then, you can’t get along with me.”  You can’t get along with me, the shoe shine man, and you can’t get along with me, Jesus, either.  I think I remember having heard something like that before.“Those who say, ‘I love God,’ and hate their brothers and sisters, are liars; for those who do not love a brother or sister whom they have seen, cannot love God whom they have not seen.  The commandment we have from him is this:  those who love God must love their brother and sister also” (1 Jn. 4:20-21).  It was John who said that, not Jesus, but I think John probably heard it from Jesus, maybe while Jesus was shining his shoes.Now before the festival of the Passover, Jesus knew that his hour had come to depart from this world and go to the Father. Having loved his own who were in the world, he loved them to the end.  The devil had already put it into the heart of Judas son of Simon Iscariot to betray him. And during supper Jesus, knowing that the Father had given all things into his hands, and that he had come from God and was going to God, got up from the table, took off his outer robe, and tied a towel around himself.  Then he poured water into a basin and began to wash the disciples’ feet and to wipe them with the towel that was tied around him.  He came to Simon Peter, who said to him, “Lord, are you going to wash my feet?”  Jesus answered, “You do not know now what I am doing, but later you will understand.”  Peter said to him, “You will never wash my feet.”  Jesus answered, “Unless I wash you, you have no share with me.” Simon Peter said to him, “Lord, not my feet only but also my hands and my head!”  Jesus said to him, “One who has bathed does not need to wash, except for the feet, but is entirely clean. And you are clean, though not all of you.”  For he knew who was to betray him; for this reason he said, “Not all of you are clean.”  After he had washed their feet, had put on his robe, and had returned to the table, he said to them, “Do you know what I have done to you?  You call me Teacher and Lord—and you are right, for that is what I am.  So if I, your Lord and Teacher, have washed your feet, you also ought to wash one another’s feet.  For I have set you an example, that you also should do as I have done to you.  Very truly, I tell you, servants are not greater than their master, nor are messengers greater than the one who sent them.  If you know these things, you are blessed if you do them.”  [Jn. 13:1-17]We tend to see this passage as extolling the virtues of servanthood.  That’s an interesting word, servanthood.  It’s not really a word at all.  It’s a church word.  Sometimes we invent church words to shield ourselves from harsh realities.  Jesus wasn’t saying anything about some church-invented abstraction called servanthood.  He was saying, be a servant. That’s the stark reality.  Actually, of course, it’s starker than that.  He was saying be a slave.  Servant is another church word, a euphemism.  In other words, be poor.  Be very poor.  The poorest of the poor.  It’s even more startling than “be among the poor.”  He’s saying to be the poor yourself.  He is saying to be a shoe shine man.  Perhaps it is my prejudice, but I assume most shoe shine men are not rolling in excess cash.  Maybe I’m wrong about that, but it did not escape my attention that the shoe shine man at the airport that day, which is to say Jesus, was a black man, and that most of the shoe shine men I’ve encountered in my life were black men, the exception being in New York, where Jesus as I experience him in the shining of shoes tends to be a Hispanic woman.  No wonder we created a churchy euphemism to deal with it.Just one chapter before this event on the night before his own death as the story reaches its climax, just before he entered Jerusalem, Jesus stopped in Bethany at the home of Lazarus, Mary, and Martha.  As usual, Martha did the serving.  Lazarus sat at the table.  The new element in the story is this.Mary took a pound of costly perfume made of pure nard, anointed Jesus’ feet, and wiped them with her hair. The house was filled with the fragrance of the perfume.  But Judas Iscariot, one of his disciples (the one who was about to betray him), said, “Why was this perfume not sold for three hundred denarii and the money given to the poor?”  (He said this not because he cared about the poor, but because he was a thief; he kept the common purse and used to steal what was put into it.)  Jesus said, “Leave her alone. She bought it so that she might keep it for the day of my burial.  You always have the poor with you, but you do not always have me.” [Jn. 12:3-8]This is perhaps one of the strangest things Jesus ever said.  It is very interesting to me for several reasons.  One of them is that this passage about the poor has parallels in two of the synoptic gospels, Matthew and Mark (interestingly, there is no parallel to this saying about the poor in Luke). There aren’t a lot of overlaps between John and the synoptic gospels—only the really, really important things.  This is one of them.What does Jesus mean by this teaching that seems strange to my ears, what appears to be an upholding of religious devotion over devotion to the poor, so counter is it to the way I understand Matthew 25, in which I think Jesus is saying that it is in people who are poor we meet Jesus himself?  This saying about always having the poor with you just doesn’t much sound like Jesus to me.Both Matthew and Mark tell the story a little differently, but they, like John, also place it just before the story of the passion heads toward its climax, even closer to the end of the story than John places it, in fact. Mark tells the story this way.While he was at Bethany in the house of Simon the leper, as he sat at the table, a woman came with an alabaster jar of very costly ointment of nard, and she broke open the jar and poured the ointment on his head.  But some were there who said to one another in anger, “Why was the ointment wasted in this way?  For this ointment could have been sold for more than three hundred denarii, and the money given to the poor.” And they scolded her.  But Jesus said, “Let her alone; why do you trouble her?  She has performed a good service for me.  For you always have the poor with you, and you can show kindness to them whenever you wish; but you will not always have me.  She has done what she could; she has anointed my body beforehand for its burial.  Truly I tell you, wherever the good news is proclaimed in the whole world, what she has done will be told in remembrance of her.”  [Mk. 14:3-9]Judas also fits into the story, just as in Luke.  It’s the next verse.  “Then Judas Iscariot, who was one of the twelve, went to the chief priests in order to betray him.”  It is the same in Matthew.  Judas comes off badly in all Matthew, Mark, and John, but there is a key difference.  In Mark and Matthew it is the reason for the betrayal.  Maybe, as John suggests, it has something to do with being thwarted in his embezzlement scheme by this unexpected appropriation of funds to buy oil.  Or maybe, as I think Mark and Matthew are trying to tell us, it is something deeper.  Could it be that the sacramental teaching going on here is too difficult for all but the most committed, the most faithful?  Is it just too upsetting to the way things are?  Is it not just Judas who is embezzling from the poor?  Could it be the rest of us, too?  So what is the sacramental teaching?Mark and Matthew are perhaps a little easier to read because of their choice of contexts, the home of Simon the leper rather than the home of Lazarus, Martha, and Mary.  The context, as Jim Wallis helpfully points out in his book, God’s Politics, is one of extreme marginalization.[1]  When Jesus said, “You always have the poor with you, and you can show kindness to them whenever you wish,” he was not suggesting we had an excuse to do nothing about the plight of the poor, which is how wealthier Christians, such as us, tend to hear it or have been taught to hear it or maybe have to hear it or we’d run screaming out of the door.  He was saying that it went without saying that his followers would always be in proximity to the poor.  He was not saying you will always have the poor, so don’t worry about it.  He was saying you will always be in proximity to the poor precisely because you are my disciples.  Wallis paraphrases Jesus this way:  “You know who we spend our time with, who we share meals with, who listens to our message, who we focus our attention on. You’ve been watching me, and you know what my priorities are.  You know who comes first in the kingdom of God.  So, you will always be near the poor, you’ll always be with them, and you will always have the opportunity to share with them.”[2]  I also owe Wallis for the insight that Jesus is referring back to Deuteronomy 15:11 and its necessary implication:  “Since there will never cease to be some in need on the earth, I therefore command you, ‘Open your hand to the poor and needy neighbor in your land.’”But back to John.  There the relevant context is not that the story takes place in the home of Simon the leper but that it is placed in such close proximity to the washing of feet.  The other clue is that it is Judas who objects to what is going on.  John adds his own explanation of why—“he said this not because he cared about the poor, but because he was a thief; he kept the common purse and used to steal what was put into it.”  Maybe.  But I don’t think it’s that simple.Here is what I think this is all about.  Given that Jesus would assume that his disciples, of all people, would always be in proximity to the poor and that it certainly doesn’t sound like Jesus to be saying that the poor are of no concern to us, could it be that what Jesus is trying to say, when you think ahead in the story to the washing of feet, is that he and the poor are one?  The point is not the poor as an abstraction.  It is the poor as an incarnate reality, and in particular one poor person at a time whether that be the shoe shine man or the single mother feeding her children from food stamps or the hospice patient rescued by the Sisters of Charity from the streets of Calcutta or an Appalachian child in danger of being trapped in an endless cycle of poverty because she cannot read just as her parents and grandparents could not?  Could it be that Jesus is saying that the point is not the poor as if the poor were an abstraction and the point is not poverty as if poverty were nothing more than a social issue?  Could it be that Jesus was saying, is saying, to stop wasting time on the poor as an unidentified mass of humanity or on poverty as a subject rich white people talk about over cocktails, to stop dealing with poor people, who have a tendency to be anonymous, and start dealing with people who are poor, who do not?  Could it be that Jesus was saying, is saying, to start being with the poor, indeed to start being the poor?  And I think the reason for that is that it is in poor people that we meet Jesus.It is like a very wise woman Jim Wallis wrote about named Mary Glover.  He describes her as an old Pentecostal woman in his neighborhood, a self-appointed missionary in a poor community, and a regular volunteer at the community food pantry.  She herself was poor and needed a bag of groceries from the pantry each week herself.  It was Mary’s job to pray on most Saturday mornings before the doors of the pantry were opened.  I want to share her prayer with you.  “Thank you, Lord, for waking us up this morning!  Thank you, Lord, that our walls were not our grave and our bed was not our cooling board!  Thank you, Lord!”  And she always ended with these words as the doors were about to be opened to a long line of people waiting in the rain, the cold, and the heat for a bag of groceries.  “Lord, we know that you’ll be coming through this line today, so Lord, help us to treat you well.”  It makes me wonder if this Mary might not turn out to be the previously anonymous woman with the oil, or at least a close relative.  There is not an ounce of ministering to in it.  (By the way, I am of the opinion that when people start talking about “ministering to,” it is time to head for the hills.)  It is all sacrament—an outward and visible sign of an inward and spiritual grace to see the Lord as he presents himself to us, in the poor, and offers an invitation not to minister to but live with.“You always have the poor—as an issue, as an abstraction, as an anonymous intellectual thing, as a problem—with you.  But you do not always have me, a person who is poor.”  Could it be that Jesus is saying to stop worrying about how to sell the expensive ointment to raise money for the poor and start pouring the ointment on people who are poor?  There is nothing about this worth very much, after all, if we do not have Jesus with us.  And if you, or the people you serve, think that is somehow antithetical to the poor, that is deeply disturbing and quite a loss and the sacramental equivalent of teaching them that the Eucharist doesn’t really matter.Here’s the deal.  It is 100% sacramental.  It is about being with Jesus.  Jesus said we would experience that grace in the bread and wine.  And he said we would experience it in the poor.  And, if so, I suspect the reason for that is not that Jesus doesn’t recognize the importance of dealing with the systems that cause poverty.  I suspect the reason is that Jesus knows that there is never going to be an effective dealing with those systems until they are being dealt with by people who have been converted by being with Jesus.  Dealing with the poor as an abstraction is a nice, altruistic thing.  Solidarity with the poor as if they were Jesus, because they are, is a much more radical thing, a thing that will turn our whole word completely upside down, a thing that, if we take it seriously, might even get us into the kingdom of God.On the night before he died, Jesus created a sacrament.  For the communities that gathered around Matthew, Mark, and Luke, the sacrament is in the breaking of bread and the sharing of the cup, what we know as the Eucharist.  They were not unaware of the importance of meeting Jesus in the poor, but that came for them earlier in the story, and the climax of the story  to be remembered in the anamnesis sense in the meal Jesus shared with them.For the community that gathered around the Gospel of John, the sacrament through which they experienced the real presence was in the washing of feet.  Like their brothers and sisters, they were not unaware of the importance of the Eucharistic meal, but that had come earlier in the story for them and the climactic action by which they remembered and entered into the passion of Christ was in becoming as a slave, becoming poor.  The two are, of course, related.  In fact, they are the same thing, Eucharist and solidarity with the poor.This is one thing Roman Catholics have all over us.  They call the primary sacrament the Mass.  Sometimes we do, too, but not that often.  I wish we would more.Roman Catholics name their primary sacrament the Mass, which is derived from the Latin for dismissal.  They make a very important point that the focus may be on the Body of Christ broken in the bread and the Blood of Christ poured out in the wine.  But the only context in which that makes any sense at all is only in the dismissal, the moment of “Go forth in the name of Christ,” or “Go in peace to love and sere the Lord.”  In other words, get out of here and, having been fed with Christ’s broken body and shed blood, go break yourselves and shed a little blood of your own and serve those who are poor, and meet me there among them because that’s where I, Jesus, will be.  Or if you dare, become poor and follow me.  They, the Eucharist and the sacrament of the poor, are two outward and visible signs of the same inward and spiritual grace, which is Jesus, only Jesus.Thank you.The Rt. Rev. Stacy F. SaulsChief Operating OfficerThe Episcopal Church Rector Knoxville, TN Curate Diocese of Nebraska Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Martinsville, VA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Ethnic Ministries, Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Featured Jobs & Calls Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Submit a Job Listing Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Bath, NC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Washington, DC Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Albany, NY Rector Hopkinsville, KYlast_img read more

first_img Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Albany, NY Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA 25 de julio de 2018Estimados amigos en Cristo:Hace unos meses, en el transcurso de mi examen médico anual, fui diagnosticado con cáncer de la próstata. Después de un sinnúmero de exámenes, consultas y conversaciones con mi esposa e hijas he decidido seguir un ciclo de tratamiento que incluye una intervención quirúrgica. El próximo 31 de julio me someteré a una cirugía para extirpar la próstata.Me complace decirles que el pronóstico es alentador y bastante positivo. He hablado con otras personas que han pasado por esto quienes me han dado ánimo y consejos útiles. Estaré internado en el hospital por lo menos durante un día y luego estaré en casa durante el proceso de recuperación.Me han dicho que puedo contar con un período razonable de ausencia de cuatro a seis semanas. Planeo reanudar mis obligaciones a principios de septiembre y no espero ningún cambio importante en mi calendario de compromisos.Me siento muy bendecido por tener una familia maravillosa, un equipo médico de primera, un gran equipo de trabajo, colegas y amigos queridos, y una vocación a la que he entregado mi vida, pero sobre todo un Dios bueno, grandioso y amoroso en cuyas manos estamos siempre. Por tanto, hagan una oración. Y sepan que espero con ansias poder regresar a mi puesto en septiembre.Que Dios los bendiga y que guarden la fe.+ MichaelReverendísimo Michael B. CurryObispo Presidente y PrimadoIglesia EpiscopalLa oficina del Obispo Presidente publicará más información a medida que esté disponible. Press Release Service Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Martinsville, VA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Belleville, IL AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Carta del Obispo Primado con motivo de su próxima cirugía Acogemos sus plegarias Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Collierville, TN Rector Bath, NC Submit an Event Listing Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Featured Jobs & Calls Submit a Job Listing Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Knoxville, TN Posted Jul 30, 2018 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Associate Rector Columbus, GA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Featured Events An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Smithfield, NC Submit a Press Release Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Washington, DC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Tampa, FL Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Pittsburgh, PA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Director of Music Morristown, NJ The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL last_img read more

first_img 7 stories that shaped Apopka’s news week:On CRA’s 25th Anniversary it’s time to build, not talk about South Apopka’s futureBreaking News: New Errol hearings put on holdFlorida Hospital Apopka CEO Tim Cook adds new hospital to his portfolioUpdating Breaking News: Missing elderly Apopka man foundApopka police officers complete nationally recognized supervisory training663 vote-by-mail ballots received for Apopka electionsNelson leads the way in huge fundraising and spending period Please enter your name here TAGSWeek in Review Previous articleThe best news of the weekNext articleIt’s a new day for comments in The Apopka Voice Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. Support conservation and fish with NEW Florida specialty license plate Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply Free webinar for job seekers on best interview answers, hosted by Goodwill June 11 The Anatomy of Fear You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here Please enter your comment!last_img read more

first_imgChipIn is a US-based service, soft-launched in May 2006, that allows people and their friends to collect money or chip in to a collection for a charity or other project. Currently it does not charge for its services, whether you are an organiser, participant, or recipient.ChipIn’s creators say that it “makes collecting money from your social network easy by automating the time-consuming process of soliciting and collecting monetary contributions.”The service is not aimed solely at charities and nonprofit organisations. Indeed, most of the uses that the site suggests for its service are personal and individual, such as a birthday or wedding present, sharing rent, splitting bills, office parties, and group travel. Advertisement Howard Lake | 19 July 2006 | News ChipIn offers free way to collect money online from social networks About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.  15 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThiscenter_img AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis To set up a ChipIn appeal you need to plan to ask at least three people via email, and set a target of between $10 and $3,000. You need to select a closing date: appeals can not just run and run.You can choose whether you want to make your ChipIn private or public, and the site now offers tools that enable users to add links to their ChipIn on their website or blog.Participants can contribute to a ChipIn using PayPal or any major credit card, and they are not required to register or provide any personal information to contribute.ChipIn does not collect any funds until the event is successful, at which point it sends participants a “Thank You” email. If the event total is not reached in time you can choose to collect whatever money has been pledged or cancel the event/appeal and not charge the contributors.As such this is not a rival to the established online donation services offered by Justgiving, Bmycharity and Charities Aid Foundation. Given it’s US origins there is for example no facility to add a Gift Aid declaration for donations to registered charities.However, it could prove a useful tool for organisations keen to exploit the possibilities of social network giving. More importantly though it could help fundraisers think through the essential elements of setting up an online appeal. In addition, as social network sites such as MySpace, Bebo and SecondLife gain popularity and user numbers, such a non-charity specific method of giving could prove popular and therefore another channel for charities.ChipIn is not unique. Its features are similar to those of dropcash and fundable.org, for example, although the latter currently charges 8.9%. The UK’s .net magazine featured ChipIn recently and gave it a 59% chance of survival. Gift Hub described it as “Grassroots giving through technology. Nice idea”.At the very least it qualifies as one of the small but growing number of fundraising or giving-related “Web 2.0” services that UK Fundraising has been following and reporting on.To find out how easy it is to set up a ChipIn we’ve created one for UK Fundraising: Tagged with: Digitallast_img read more

first_img About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.  147 total views,  2 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis21  146 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis21 Feline welfare charity Cats Protection is to run a new mass participation event in 2017. It has appointed GOOD Agency to help devise and launch the event.GOOD Agency has been tasked with creating an event that will attract a new cat loving audience as well as current Cats Protection supporters.Andy Powell, Associate Creative Director at GOOD Agency said:“As an agency filled with cat lovers, we’re purring with delight at this win. We have great experience working in the crowded events marketplace and can’t wait to create the cream of the crop for Cats Protection.”GOOD Agency won the business after a competitive pitch against London and Brighton-based agencies.Cats Protection helps around 200,000 cats each year through its national network of over 250 volunteer-run branches and 32 centres. Howard Lake | 30 August 2016 | News Advertisement Cats Protection to create mass participation event in 2017 Tagged with: Consulting & Agencies Eventslast_img read more

first_imgHome Indiana Agriculture News September WASDE Report Shows Lower U.S Corn, Soybean Production Facebook Twitter By NAFB News Service – Sep 13, 2020 Previous articlePork Market Surges as Exports do the SameNext articleFarm Bureau Launches Election Toolkit for Voters NAFB News Service The September World Ag Supply and Demand Estimates from USDA show U.S. corn production is down two percent from the August forecast. Soybean production dropped six percent from the previous month.Corn production is forecast at 14.9 billion bushels, still nine percent higher than 2019. Yields will be a record 178.5 bushels per acre, down 3.3 bushels from August. Corn ending stocks will drop by 253 million bushels from last month, while the season-average price jumps 40 cents to $3.50 a bushel.Soybean production is forecast at 4.3 billion bushels, down 112 million on a lower yield forecast at 51.9 bushels per acre. Ending stocks are projected at 460 million bushels, down 150 million from August. The season-average soybean price is projected at $9.25 a bushel, up 90 cents from last month.The wheat supply and demand outlook is unchanged this month, but there are offsetting by-class changes for wheat exports. The season-average farm price remains at $4.50 a bushel. September WASDE Report Shows Lower U.S Corn, Soybean Production Facebook Twitter SHARE SHARElast_img read more

first_imgFacebook Facebook Linkedin Sickle cell support group raises awareness, gives back to local doctors Twitter print Butterflies Exhibit from TCU Student Media on Vimeo.Spring is in full bloom and so are the butterflies.The Fort Worth Botanic Garden is hosting a spring series, Butterflies in the Garden: A Mayan Experience. Guests can see more than 50 species of butterflies at the on-site conservatory until April 3.“Right away when people walk into the conservatory, they’re getting a tropical experience,” said Larinda Smith, volunteer coordinator for the garden.Smith said this year’s event is different than events in the past.“We are allowing gentle touching of the butterflies,” Smith said. “It’s been a great experience for everyone so far because people are getting a one-on-one interaction with the butterflies.”Janice Schwartz, a visitor to the garden, said she took her two children to the exhibit. She said her children spent the first part of the day in programs that discussed the lifestyles and different types of butterflies.Map of several butterfly origins within the exhibit.“After learning about the butterflies, it was great to be able to see and touch them at the end of the day,” Schwartz said. “It seems the kids have a new appreciation for the butterflies because they were able to engage with them.”Smith said the hands-on approach at the exhibit provides a learning experience to both adults and children in the community.Erdie Allsup, executive director of the Fort Worth Botanical Society, said all the proceeds from Butterflies in the Garden fund different local projects.Four organizations were involved in the planning of the exhibit: The Fort Worth Garden Club, the Fort Worth Botanic Garden, the Botanical Research Institute of Texas and the Fort Worth Botanical Society.“In previous years, we’ve budgeted between $100,000 and $150,000,” Allsup said. “This year, the costs remain about the same, but we’re hoping to generate around $300,000.”Allsup said the four organizations divide the money generated from the event to fund individual projects.“This year, we created a contest for the local schools where children could create and send in their own logo design,” Allsup said. “Our logo for Butterflies in the Garden comes directly from a student in the local school system.”The exhibit is open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Sunday. Entry is $10 for adults and $6 for children ages 3-12. Visitors 65 and older get in for $8. Community to host fundraiser Monday to support injured Fort Worth officer Grains to grocery: One bread maker brings together farmers and artisans at locally-sourced store Previous articleCavins-Tull: TCU Alert workedNext articleTCU coasts to easy NIT victory over UT Rio Grande Valley Claire Girman RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR The109: Community hosts fundraiser to support injured Fort Worth officer Claire Girmanhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/claire-girman/ Open Streets event closes roadway in order to open for people Claire Girmanhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/claire-girman/center_img + posts Fort Worth set to elect first new mayor in 10 years Saturday Claire Girman is a journalism major from Chapel Hill, North Carolina. She’s fueled by college sports rage, literature and French press coffee. Claire Girmanhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/claire-girman/ Linkedin Claire Girmanhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/claire-girman/ Twitter Claire Girman Abortion access threatened as restrictive bills make their way through Texas Legislature ReddIt ReddItlast_img read more

first_img Top of the News 0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it First Heatwave Expected Next Week Image credit: Machine Project at the Gamble House, a PAC commissioned project for the 2014 AxS Festival.Joining the Board of Trustees are Richard Haluschak, Dana Sadava, Denise Therieau, Joyce Wedseltoft, and Susan Woolley. “PAC has an ambitious agenda for 2017 and we are thrilled to welcome 5 new Trustees to the Board,” states Board President Nancy Hytone Leb. “We’re honored to have such a talented, diverse group of individuals and quite confident that our growing Board can provide the necessary leadership and support to assist PAC in achieving its goals for 2017 and beyond.”Richard Haluschak is the Senior Vice President, Chief Financial Officer for ArtCenter College of Design, where he has been instrumental in establishing and implementing institutional strategic and financial planning, and works closely with the College’s educational leadership to develop strategic plans for educational initiatives. Mr. Haluschak has been involved with all ArtCenter capital projects, including the development of the South Campus and plans for student housing. Mr. Haluschak serves on several other governing boards including Pasadena Federal Credit Union and SOPHIE Trust.Southern California native Dana Sadava is the Founder and Artistic Director of the Pasadena Opera. Ms. Sadava made her conducting debut at Opera San Jose with Lucia di Lammermoor and Barber of Seville. She recently conducted the world premiere of Steve Lewis’ Noon at Dusk at the University of California, San Diego and served on the faculty of the Napa Music Festival. She has been a conductor and vocal coach at Wexford Festival Opera, Banff Opera as Theatre, Pensacola Opera, Indianapolis Opera, Comic Opera Guild, and the Bay Area Summer Opera Theatre Institute. Her work has been profiled on NPR (“State of the Arts”), Pasadena Magazine, Pasadena Star News, San Jose Mercury News, and others.Denise Therieau is a partner with the real estate firm, Deasy/Penner & Partners, a local firm that focuses on selling architectural, historic and luxury properties. She has been selling real estate in the Pasadena area for the last 12 years. Prior to this, she worked as a fundraiser at the San Diego Museum of Art, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum of Art, Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles and in the School of Architecture at USC. Denise lives in San Gabriel with her two young children.Joyce Wedesltoft brings her 40+ year career in Information Technology project management, business systems strategies, solutions and implementations to the organization. Joyce has held leadership positions in various non-profits including President of her homeowners’ association board, President of the Instrumental Music Club at Pasadena High school, Trustee for the Pasadena Day Nursery, and various committee work at her church. She has been a proud advocate for public education in Pasadena.Susan Woolley has practiced law for almost thirty years. Susan has served as an expert and consultant to the U.S. Department of Justice Civil Rights Division and Fortune 500 Companies. The Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors appointed her to the County Equity Oversight Panel which reviews and evaluates workplace investigations conducted countywide. Susan graduated from the Stanford Law School and clerked at the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of California. Susan is an adjunct professor at Loyola Law School, where she teaches Fact Investigation. She served on the Boards of the Association of Workplace Investigators, the Asthma and Allergy Foundation, and several parent-teacher organizations.About Pasadena Arts CouncilPasadena Arts Council is a non-governmental, not-for-profit organization that provides resources, programs and services to artists and arts organizations. The agency offers an independent voice for promoting a vibrant cultural community by facilitating, empowering and advocating for the arts.For over a decade PAC has supported artists through its acclaimed EMERGE program, offering mentorship and administrative services to hundreds of artists and independent arts organizations. PAC produces the AxS Festival, a citywide celebration of art and science featuring exhibitions, performances, educational activities and a Conversation Series which honors and reflects on the allied importance of both the arts and the sciences to the dynamic tenor of our time. PAC recently launched the AxS Incubator residency program, and over the next year will present challenging new projects by artists working at several of Pasadena’s renown scientific research institutions, including Caltech, NASA/JPL, and the Huntington.Please e-mail [email protected] or call (626) 793-8171 for more information. Community News Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadena More Cool Stuff Subscribe Community News Pasadena Arts Council Announces the Appointment of Five New Members to its Board of Trustees From STAFF REPORTS Published on Monday, December 12, 2016 | 11:52 amcenter_img EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. 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first_img The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago  Print This Post Subscribe in Daily Dose, Featured, Government, News Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Sign up for DS News Daily CFPB Ocwen 2017-04-20 Seth Welborn Ocwen Responds to Suit from CFPB, 21 States April 20, 2017 5,529 Views Tagged with: CFPB Ocwen Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Related Articles Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Home / Daily Dose / Ocwen Responds to Suit from CFPB, 21 States The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Share Save According to a complaint made by the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) and 21 states, Ocwen Financial Corporation “engaged in significant and systemic misconduct at nearly every stage of the mortgage servicing process.” The lawsuit claims that Ocwen serviced loans using error-filled data, illegally foreclosed on at least 1,000 homeowners, failed to credit borrower payments, mismanaged escrow accounts, failed to cancel borrowers’ private mortgage insurance in a timely manner, deceptively signed up and charged borrowers for add-ons, failed to adequately investigate borrower complaints, failed to provide accurate information to new servicers when rights were sold, and failed to assist heirs with foreclosure prevention. Additionally, the complaint alleged that Ocwen did not properly remediate borrowers for harm caused. “Ocwen has repeatedly made mistakes and taken shortcuts at every stage of the mortgage servicing process, costing some consumers money and others their homes,” CFPB Director Richard Cordray said. “Borrowers have no say over who services their mortgage, so the Bureau will remain vigilant to ensure they get fair treatment.”Ocwen responded to the suit, calling the CFPB’s actions “politically motivated and a reaction to the change of administration and recent scrutiny of the CFPB’s activities.” Additionally, Ocwen released the following statement: “The substantive allegations in today’s suit are inaccurate and unfounded. Indeed, the Company is unaware of the CFPB conducting any detailed review of Ocwen’s loan servicing files.  The CFPB suit is primarily based on the CFPB’s flawed review of data and its self-serving conclusion about isolated instances where Ocwen self-identified ways we can do better.” In a separate statement, Ocwen noted that it “will not sign unfair and unjust consent orders that make impractical demands that no other market participant could rationally accept, and which would harm consumers.””Under these circumstances, Ocwen has a responsibility to its customers, shareholders, and employees to vigorously defend the Company against unfounded claims while continuing to work with State Regulators to resolve any valid concerns,” said the statement.In a separate suit, the state of Florida alleged Ocwen committed errors that caused “significant harm to borrowers.” Twenty other states also followed suit in taking legal action against the lender.In response to these filings, an Ocwen spokesperson said “We have just received various orders from state mortgage regulators, and are in the process of reviewing them in detail. We will respond promptly to all of the matters raised after a full review.”Ocwen is one of the country’s largest non-bank mortgage lenders, with a portfolio of nearly 1.4 million loans and a balance of $209 billion. Aly J. Yale is a freelance writer and editor based in Fort Worth, Texas. She has worked for various newspapers, magazines, and publications across the nation, including The Dallas Morning News and Addison Magazine. She has also worked with both the Five Star Institute and REO Red Book, as well as various other mortgage industry clients on content strategy, blogging, marketing, and more. Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago About Author: Aly J. Yale Previous: Greenspan: Dodd-Frank Stifling Stock Market Next: Paper Proposes Plan for GSE Reform Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days agolast_img read more